Globalisation Quotes

Quotes tagged as "globalisation" (showing 1-30 of 40)
Michael Crichton
“[..]Although personally, I think cyberspace means the end of our species."
Yes? Why is that?"
Because it means the end of innovation," Malcolm said. "This idea that the whole world is wired together is mass death. Every biologist knows that small groups in isolation evolve fastest. You put a thousand birds on an ocean island and they'll evolve very fast. You put ten thousand on a big continent, and their evolution slows down. Now, for our own species, evolution occurs mostly through our behaviour. We innovate new behaviour to adapt. And everybody on earth knows that innovation only occurs in small groups. Put three people on a committee and they may get something done. Ten people, and it gets harder. Thirty people, and nothing happens. Thirty million, it becomes impossible. That's the effect of mass media - it keeps anything from happening. Mass media swamps diversity. It makes every place the same. Bangkok or Tokyo or London: there's a McDonald's on one corner, a Benetton on another, a Gap across the street. Regional differences vanish. All differences vanish. In a mass-media world, there's less of everything except the top ten books, records, movies, ideas. People worry about losing species diversity in the rain forest. But what about intellectual diversity - our most necessary resource? That's disappearing faster than trees. But we haven't figured that out, so now we're planning to put five billion people together in cyberspace. And it'll freeze the entire species. Everything will stop dead in its tracks. Everyone will think the same thing at the same time. Global uniformity. [..]”
Michael Crichton, The Lost World

Christopher Hitchens
“[I]f you think that American imperialism and its globalised, capitalist form is the most dangerous thing in the world, that means you don't think the Islamic Republic of Iran or North Korea or the Taliban is as bad.”
Christopher Hitchens

Jeanette Winterson
“Where you are born--what you are born into, the place, the history of the place, how that history mates with your own-- stamps who you are, whatever the pundits of globalisation have to say.”
Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

“From deep within, our spirits are calling for a new and greater global wholeness, global healing, and global opportunity -- the voice is ours, the time is now, and the resources are what we have.”
Laura Teresa Marquez

“Belonging, after all, is a particular kind of relation, one that arises amidst subjective experiences of mutual connection.”
Naomi Leite, Unorthodox Kin: Portuguese Marranos and the Global Search for Belonging

Karmak Bagisbayev
“People and animals come together in herd-communities with their own kind exclusively to a single end. Each individual strives to preserve their own genes but achieving that alone can become extremely difficult or even impossible. It is easier to find a partner for the realisation of the basic instinct as a member of a herd and so ultimately, the prime principle in play is still the Law of Gene Preservation. It is easier to defend oneself from a more powerful enemy as a member of a herd. A pack of hyenas, for example, can face down a powerful predator like a lion, whereas an individual hyena would have no chance.

In a herd it is easier to hunt and gather large sources of food, which it would be impossible for a lone animal to find. This is the case for lions, wolves and all other herd predators, including mankind.

The unification of human beings into ever larger communities, beginning with tribes and clans in prehistoric times, then nations and states in the Middle Ages, continues today in the process called world globalisation. The reason for globalisation is the same as it was a thousand years ago. It provides the best conditions for preserving one’s own gene.”
Karmak Bagisbayev, The Last Faith: a book by an atheist believer

“Globalisation Means the whole world, not just some of us.”
Auliq Ice

Alexander McCall Smith
“…products of soulless machines and relentless globalization…”
Alexander McCall Smith, The Revolving Door of Life

“Jeremy Corbyns actions have led a significant percentage of his followers to believe that his words serve a higher purpose than the complete religious or social indoctrination of the British people. He deliberately disregards the historical fact that multiculturalism only works when both parties are willing to find a compromise they can live with. When multiculturalism becomes a matter of sacrificing your way of life to accommodate mass migration, it paves the way to genocide.”
Anita B. Sulser, We Are One

Gyan Nagpal
“In a digitally enabled world, all businesses are global.”
Gyan Nagpal, Talent Economics: The Fine Line Between Winning and Losing the Global War for Talent

J.R.R. Tolkien
“The bigger things get the smaller and duller or flatter the globe gets. It is getting to be all one blasted little provincial suburb. When they have introduced American sanitation, morale-pep, feminism, and mass production throughout the Near East, Middle East, Far East, U.S.S.R., the Pampas, el Gran Chaco, the Danubian Basin, Equatorial Africa, Hirther Further and Inner Mumbo-land, Gondhwannaland, Lhasas, and the villages of darkest Berkshire, how happy we shall be . At any rate it out to cut down travel. There will be nowhere to go. So people will (I opine) go all the faster. (leter 53)”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

“This is a study of global interconnection, not only to the degree that the infrastructure and cultural flows of globalisation enable the kinds of imaginings and interactions I explore in the pages that follow, but equally in subjective perceptions of being connected to others, both far back in time and widely around the globe.”
Naomi Leite, Unorthodox Kin: Portuguese Marranos and the Global Search for Belonging

“From an anthropological perspective, identities are neither fixed nor inherent, but are created and reproduced continuously through social practice and in interaction with others.”
Naomi Leite, Unorthodox Kin: Portuguese Marranos and the Global Search for Belonging

“Relatedness - whether imagined or lived out face-to-face - is a social fact, and it is not limited to "kinship" as mapped in the traditional genealogical chart. It is precisely the term's flexibility that makes it so analytically useful.”
Naomi Leite, Unorthodox Kin: Portuguese Marranos and the Global Search for Belonging

“While imagination is a faculty of the individual, imaginaries - "shared, socially transmitted representational assemblages" of people, places, and events - are a collective resource, the sum total of available imagery and ideas circulating in media, advertising, literature, word of mouth, and the like.”
Naomi Leite, Unorthodox Kin: Portuguese Marranos and the Global Search for Belonging

“I define culinary tourism as the intentional, exploratory participation in the foodways of an other - participation including the consumption, preparation, and presentation of a food item, cuisine, meal system, or eating style considered to belong to a culinary system not one’s own.”
Lucy M. Long, Culinary Tourism

“A culinary cosmopolitan perspective resides in a context of tremendous inequality, but it may simultaneously facilitate meaningful cultural exchange, and attempt to link food choices to global risks like climate change.”
Josée Johnston, Foodies: Democracy and Distinction in the Gourmet Foodscape

“I find it fascinating that this bottle is so cosmopolitan, a true multicultural brew, but it is so quiet about it.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“Only from our position of power can we afford to ignore where things really come from, because we know that all things drain, like syrup through a pipeline, from the edges of the world into the centre. What we want will appear, as if by magic, on the shelves of our supermarkets because were have the money to pay for it. We don’t have to know - other people grow it and process it, and buy it and sell it until all we see is the brand, a language we understand without effort. All those strange substances are fuzed together for our convenience, our health, our pleasure.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“How fragile is a world so connected and tied together that a change in food fashion in one place can lead to starvation halfway through the world?”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“Or could it be that there is something about globalisation itself that produces local culture, and promotes the constant formation of new forms of local identity, dress, cuisine, music, dance and language?”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“Globalisation creates a world where causes are remote form effects, and the connections between them are often hidden or obscure.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“The idea that foods and diets will “just mix” when they come into contact is clearly a vast oversimplification.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“People want to think of a food tradition as something that would continue unchanging and timeless, unless some outside force knocked things askew.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“There is no culture where everyone cooks in the same way.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“But instead of being frozen in time, I want to show that “local” and “authentic” food are as much creations of modernity as survivors from before it. Authenticity is therefore a problem, not something we can ever depend on as some kind of naturally occurring category. Tradition is crafted, just as much as modernity is manufactured.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“The inevitable result of any search for authenticity is that you always end up with something completely modern in intent, since the purpose of the performance lies in the present, not the past.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

“The world becomes a pageant of diversity with its differences neatly organised and selected.”
Richard R. Wilk, Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists

Paddy Chayefsky
“You have meddled with the primal forces of nature, Mr. Beale, and I won't have it! Is that clear? You think you've merely stopped a business deal. That is not the case! The Arabs have taken billions of dollars out of this country, and now they must put it back! It is ebb and flow, tidal gravity! It is ecological balance! You are an old man who thinks in terms of nations and peoples. There are no nations. There are no peoples. There are no Russians. There are no Arabs. There are no third worlds. There is no West. There is only one holistic system of systems, one vast and immane, interwoven, interacting, multivariate, multinational dominion of dollars. Petro-dollars, electro-dollars, multi-dollars, reichmarks, rins, rubles, pounds, and shekels. It is the international system of currency which determines the totality of life on this planet. That is the natural order of things today. That is the atomic and subatomic and galactic structure of things today! And YOU have meddled with the primal forces of nature, and YOU... WILL... ATONE! Am I getting through to you, Mr. Beale? You get up on your little twenty-one inch screen and howl about America and democracy. There is no America. There is no democracy. There is only IBM, and ITT, and AT&T, and DuPont, Dow, Union Carbide, and Exxon. Those are the nations of the world today. What do you think the Russians talk about in their councils of state, Karl Marx? They get out their linear programming charts, statistical decision theories, minimax solutions, and compute the price-cost probabilities of their transactions and investments, just like we do. We no longer live in a world of nations and ideologies, Mr. Beale. The world is a college of corporations, inexorably determined by the immutable bylaws of business. The world is a business, Mr. Beale. It has been since man crawled out of the slime. And our children will live, Mr. Beale, to see that... perfect world... in which there's no war or famine, oppression or brutality. One vast and ecumenical holding company, for whom all men will work to serve a common profit, in which all men will hold a share of stock. All necessities provided, all anxieties tranquilized, all boredom amused. And I have chosen you, Mr. Beale, to preach this evangel.”
Paddy Chayefsky, Network [Screenplay]

« previous 1