Charlus Quotes

Quotes tagged as "charlus" Showing 1-7 of 7
Marcel Proust
“M. de Charlus made no reply and looked as if he had not heard, which was one of his favourite forms of rudeness.”
Marcel Proust, Sodom and Gomorrah

Marcel Proust
“Do you imagine that the poisonous spittle of five hundred little men of your sort, hoisted on to each other's shoulders, could even drool down on to the tips of my august toes?”
Marcel Proust, The Guermantes Way

Marcel Proust
“M. de Charlus persisted in not replying. I thought I could see a smile flicker about his lips: the smile of the man who looks down from a great height on the characters and manners of lesser men.”
Marcel Proust, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower

Marcel Proust
“At that moment, noticing that his embroidered handkerchief was revealing part of its coloured edging, he thrust it back into his pocket with a startled glance, like a prudish but not innocent woman concealing bodily charms which in her excessive modesty she sees as wanton.”
Marcel Proust, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower

Marcel Proust
“...As for all the little people who call themselves Marquis de Cambremerde or de Gotoblazes, there is no difference between them and the humblest rookie in your regiment. Whether you go and do wee-wee at the Countess Cack's or cack at the Baroness Wee-wee's, it's exactly the same, you will have compromised your reputation and have used a shitty rag instead of toilet paper. Which is unsavoury.”
Marcel Proust, Sodom and Gomorrah

Marcel Proust
“He lives at Balbec?” crooned the Baron in a tone so far from interrogatory that it is regrettable that the written language does not possess a sign other than the question mark to end such apparently unquestioning remarks. It is true that such a sign would be of little use except to M. de Charlus.”
Marcel Proust, Sodom and Gomorrah

Marcel Proust
“Mme Verdurin asked him: "Did you have some of my orangeade?" Whereupon M. de Charlus, with a gracious smile, in a crystalline tone which he rarely adopted, and with endless simperings and wrigglings of the hips, replied: "No, I preferred its neighbour, which is strawberry-juice, I think. It's delicious."[...]But on hearing M. de Charlus say, in that shrill voice and with that smile and those gestures, "No, I preferred its neighbour, the strawberry-juice," one could say: "Ah, he likes the stronger sex,"[...]”
Marcel Proust, Sodom and Gomorrah