Good Minds Suggest: Wally Lamb’s Favorite Books for Fellow Film Geeks

Posted by Goodreads on November 7, 2016
Wally Lamb

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Every author dreams of having one of their books selected for Oprah's Book Club. Wally Lamb has earned Oprah's stamp of approval twice with his first two novels, She's Come Undone and I Know This Much Is True. Lamb's other novels include Wishin' and Hopin', The Hour I First Believed, and We Are Water.

Lamb's back this November with I'll Take You There, which follows the life of baby boomer Felix Funicello, whom we were first introduced to in Wishin' and Hopin'. Felix is a film scholar who finds himself confronted by the ghost of a trailblazing female movie director from Hollywood's silent film era. This spirit projects scenes from Felix's life onto the big screen and gives the scholar a new way to examine his relationships with the women in his life.

Here the author offers his own take on books for film lovers:

The Day of the Locust by Nathanael West
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"Nathanael West's masterwork, set during the Great Depression, is populated with a cast of strange and desperate characters in search of the American dream via the fake promises of Hollywood. West's literary exploration of decadence and decay in Tinseltown unnerves and fascinates."


Blonde by Joyce Carol Oates
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"New York Times book reviewer Laura Miller aptly described Joyce Carol Oates's novel as 'fat, messy, and fierce.' In one of her best novels, the prolific Oates fictionally resuscitates Hollywood legend Marilyn Monroe and allows her to speak her inner truths about her challenging childhood, her skyrocketing rise to fame, and her Icarus-like descent."


The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
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"James Ellroy makes the crime novel literary in this tale about a grisly 1940s murder based on an actual case. One-fourth of Ellroy's L.A. Quartet of novels (the others are L.A. Confidential, White Jazz, and The Big Nowhere), this page-turner is noir at its best."


The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies by David Thomson
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"David Thomson is one of the most respected and reliable Hollywood historians. His examination of the film industry, from its humble Hollywood beginnings to today's corporate-controlled superhero flicks, is a comprehensive page-turner and a must for anyone interested in the big picture of the motion picture history."


Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood by Mark Harris
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"Mark Harris is a writer who simultaneously entertains and informs. Here he takes on the collision between the waning studio system and the emerging '60s and '70s counterculture. Against all odds, Fox's big-budget Doctor Doolittle tanks as edgy indies (Bonnie and Clyde, In the Heat of the Night, etc.) trend, making for a chronicle that's fascinating and fun."





Vote for your own favorites on Listopia: I Saw the Movie and Read the Book



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message 1: by Betty (new)

Betty Picture at the Revolution by, Mark Harris is a very good read.


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