Goodreads Blog

Goodreads Introduces Kindle Ebook Giveaways Beta Program (U.S. market)

Posted by Greg Seguin on May 03, 2016


Last year, Goodreads helped authors and publishers give away more than 300,000 print books in our popular Giveaways program! Thanks to this success, authors and publishers have been clamoring for the option to run ebook giveaways with Goodreads. Today, we have the news you’ve been waiting for! The beta launch of our new Kindle ebook giveaways program is now underway.

Here’s how it works: The author or publisher of a book – whoever controls the digital distribution rights to the book – can now offer up to 100 copies of the Kindle ebook in a giveaway. The author or publisher chooses how long the giveaway will run, and Goodreads does the rest. At the end of the giveaway, Goodreads randomly chooses winners and automatically sends the Kindle ebooks to their preferred devices and Cloud accounts. Winners receive real Kindle ebooks, complete with all the great features and security that Amazon’s Kindle platform provides.



Kindle ebook giveaways will initially be open to Goodreads members in the U.S. During this beta period, Goodreads is working with several publishers to host Kindle ebook giveaways, but once out of beta, the program will be open to any author or publisher - whoever owns the digital distribution rights for the book - who sells their ebooks on Amazon.

The cost of listing a Kindle book giveaway is $119, which allows you to offer up to 100 Kindle ebooks. Listing a print book giveaway will continue to be free. Why the difference? Both types of giveaways give authors and publishers a powerful way to market their books, reach lots of new readers, and drive buzz. With a Kindle ebook giveaway, we give you the opportunity to offer a large number of free books, reaching even more readers. We also save you on both costs and hassle. No more printing books, hauling them down to the post office, filling out address labels, and paying to ship them off to winners (which can cost hundreds of dollars for a 100-copy giveaway). No more delays in getting your books in winners’ hands. The readers who win your Kindle ebook giveaway will get their Kindle ebook instantly and will be able to start reading right away, which means you can get readers talking about your title faster than ever.

Authors and publishers have come to count on Goodreads print giveaways as a key part of their marketing plans. They are a powerful way to raise awareness of an upcoming book or reignite interest in a previously published book, and they generate the kind of engagement that makes readers take note. Giveaways are especially useful before a book is published, building the buzz and word-of-mouth excitement – through pre-release reviews and friends seeing their friends adding the book to their want to read shelves – that help successfully launch books.



Why should I run a Goodreads Giveaway?
The primary benefit of running a giveaway on Goodreads is generating excitement for your book. Many giveaway winners review the books they win, meaning that you can build word-of-mouth buzz early in your book’s life. The ability to offer up to 100 copies of a book will greatly increase your chances of receiving a good number of reviews.

Additionally, when a reader enters your giveaway, a post appears in all of their Goodreads friends’ and followers’ newsfeeds, which in turn, creates more entries, more people adding your book to their Want To Read shelves, and more awareness. That’s something you won’t get anywhere else.

Giving away 100 books or more is the technique that large publishers have been using for years with great success on Goodreads. For example, Riverhead Books has said that Goodreads played a major role in helping The Girl on the Train break out to early success. To help drive early reviews, they gave away 100 copies on Goodreads (case study). In total, they printed more than 4,000 advanced copies of the debut novel, as they knew that getting the book into a lot of readers’ hands was a key way to help make it a breakout hit.

Will I still be able to run print book giveaways?
If you love our print book giveaway program, don’t worry; it’s not going anywhere. Print book giveaways will remain free to list (though you are responsible for the costs of printing and shipping the books to the winners).

I’m an author and I want to run a Kindle book giveaway. What do I do?
For this initial beta, we are working exclusively with select publishing partners, but you’ll be able to list a Kindle ebook giveaway soon. We will open up Kindle ebook giveaways to all publishers and KDP authors with an ebook in the Amazon store in the near future. Stay tuned for more!

When will Kindle ebook giveaways be available outside the U.S.?
We’re starting off with the program in the U.S. Our goal is to make sure that we offer all of our features in other markets, but we do not have any timing on this.

My book isn’t published yet. Can I offer ebook ARCs?
You can run a giveaway for a book that has not yet been published yet. The only requirement is that the ARC must be in a Kindle ebook format and loaded into the Kindle store before you list your giveaway.

How are these giveaways different from Amazon Giveaways?
The two programs are completely separate. With Amazon Giveaways, you purchase each copy of whatever book you want to give away. With Kindle Ebook Giveaways, you pay a flat listing fee to give away up to 100 copies of your book. Additionally, Kindle Ebook Giveaways are available for pre-publication titles, while Amazon Giveaways are not.

Next: Six Lovely Lessons Learned at the Romantic Times Convention

You might also like: Five Tips for Running a Giveaway on Goodreads

Goodreads Authors can subscribe to the Monthly Author Newsletter by editing their account settings.

Comments (showing 1-50 of 328) (328 new)


message 1: by Eddie (new)

Eddie Jones Great news. Did I miss the part about when this new feature rolls out?


message 2: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt How do I sign up?

This is just what I've been looking for!


message 3: by Jim (new)

Jim Heskett Will these count as sales on my Amazon dashboard? Will I be able to give away books that are in KDP select, or is that a violation of exclusivity terms? Do I have to purchase the books in addition to paying the $119 fee to host the giveaway? Will I be able to see the email addresses of people who won?


message 4: by Mainlinebooker (new)

Mainlinebooker I would love this


message 5: by Greg (new)

Greg Seguin Jim wrote: "Will these count as sales on my Amazon dashboard? Will I be able to give away books that are in KDP select, or is that a violation of exclusivity terms? Do I have to purchase the books in addition ..."

Hi Jim, thanks for posting!

Books you give away through this program will not count as sales on Amazon or count towards your sales rank.

You will be able to give away your KDP-Select titles, so no worries there.

$119 is the all-in price. You don't have to purchase the books! We take care of selecting the winners and delivering the books to their Kindle libraries.

You'll be able to see winners' names and user profiles but we won't be able to share their email addresses.


message 6: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Neville $119? I run a 'one autographed copy of a paperback' giveaway every month. Postage is just over $3.00. Envelope about a buck and book $6-$9. Cheaper.
Maybe give a range of prices, per book given away, fee?
Like ten books for ten bucks?
Thanks, Barb


message 7: by Alicia (last edited May 05, 2016 10:08AM) (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Greg wrote: "$119 is the all-in price. You don't have to purchase the books! We take care of selecting the winners and delivering the books to their Kindle libraries. ..."

If a book isn't popular, do you just keep it up until the 100 are given away? New writers don't necessarily have big fan bases - which is why they're giving away books.


message 8: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 05, 2016 10:20AM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) By "Want to Read" shelves I assume as usual that means the book is placed on the entrant's "To Read" shelf just like the green "Want to Read" button in search results and on book/series pages.

I'd love for entrants to be able to set which shelf name they use to mean "wishlist" or "want to read" and for giveaway entries put books on that shelf. Some readers might use "to read" shelf for books already bought but not read yet (and don't notice the little checkmark adding giveaway entries to it).

Jim wrote: "Will I be able to see the email addresses of people who won? ..."

That would violate goodreads and Amazon privacy policies (and violate U.S. CAN/SPAM unless giveaway terms specifically said that would happen -- which they could; plenty of giveaways and contests do state your email address will be shared, you will be signing up for contact by third parties, etc. Current ebook giveaway terms didn't say the email behind your Amazon and goodreads accounts would be shared with third parties. ).

Possibly goodreads might allow you to put a link to where entrants can sign up for your mailing list in the giveaway description; not sure of that policy. (I know you can link to a mailing-list or newsletter signup on your author page/profile description, your status updates and any linked blog posts).

Goodreads doesn't even allow authors to message winners or entrants. Would have to change their TOS and guidelines to start allowing unasked commercial contact or email address sharing.

ETA: I expect goodreads and/or Amazon do contact the winners for you.


T. K. Elliott (Tiffany) Since these books are given away via the Kindle store, if the winner reviews the book on Amazon (which is part of the point of doing the giveaway) will they count as a "Verified Review"?

If so, this is excellent news.


message 10: by Starla (new)

Starla Huchton I'm curious if these gifted copies will show up as Verified Purchases on Amazon, which would be very helpful review-wise.


message 11: by Ruby (new)

Ruby Madden Glad you're rolling this out... however, $119 is WAY TOO EXPENSIVE. Why so high?


message 12: by Joshua (new)

Joshua The $119 fee is ridiculous and is punishing people (indie authors, particularly) for not having hard copy books. Amazon allows you to do free giveaways which is why so many people use it. I was excited to see that this service would be available, but saw in the end that you intended to exploit indie authors the way everyone does (including Amazon). But thanks for saving us the "cost and hassle." Between the high prices for Goodread ads and this new 'service,' how is any independent writer supposed to get ahead in the world? Thanks...but no thanks.


message 13: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 05, 2016 03:30PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) It would be good if Amazon would show reviews from winners as from either "Verified Purchaser" or maybe a new "Giveaway Winner" or "Goodreads Giveaway Winner" designation.

Could help with reviewers not remembering to disclose the free product in the review.

(But, I also thought Amazon should have done that for their own giveaways, "Verified Purchaser" or "Giveaway Winner".)

ETA: and, although off touch for this goodreads thread, Amazon should also do that for KOLL/KU borrows -- show those reviews as from people who at least could be verified as having borrowed the book with their subscription fees.


message 14: by James (new)

James I think we've all been waiting for this, and there's a lot to like here. Aside from the big benefit of goodreads promotion to reach tons of readers, I especially like being able to offer ARCs. Getting tons of copies of a new release immediately into the hands of the winners would be a great way to launch a book.

Although it would be nice (for those of us on a budget) to have the option to offer fewer copies and pay less.

And once you're able to open it up to readers outside the US, that will be really great.

Anyway, it looks to be a much better option than an Amazon giveaway.


message 15: by Hayley (new)

Hayley Shaver Alicia wrote: "How do I sign up?

This is just what I've been looking for!"

Seriously, though, I've heard more positive buzz about Bookbub's similar program than this one. Even though that costs a bit more and has a waiting list, I'll save my dinero and do that program before this one.


message 16: by Hayley (new)

Hayley Shaver D.A. • shelf! Shelf! SHELF! wrote: "It would be good if Amazon would show reviews from winners as from either "Verified Purchaser" or maybe a new "Giveaway Winner" or "Goodreads Giveaway Winner" designation.

Could help with reviewer..."

I totally agree. Easier is always better.


message 17: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Hayley wrote: "Alicia wrote: "How do I sign up?

This is just what I've been looking for!"
Seriously, though, I've heard more positive buzz about Bookbub's similar program than this one. Even though that costs a ..."


Bookbub is quite expensive and you need a decent number of reviews (although they say it's not true, check out the email they send you as a reader - lots of reviews).

So don't expect to be allowed to advertise with them as easily as you want.


message 18: by Scarletine (new)

Scarletine Why would I pay $119 when I could do a giveaway coupon through Smashwords, and post on Twitter and Facebook for FREE. There are plenty of ways to offload 100 copies of an ebook, if you really want to.

$119 is a crazy amount of money to charge...and basically, it's like paying for reviews... Isn't that the very reason Amazon have been deleteing blogger reviews-because they think they are gaining financially from giving good reviews?

And FYI - the m/m author who's tweet you posted at the top of this notice is from the UK so she can't even do a give away if she wanted to, as its US only!


message 19: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Scarletine wrote: "Why would I pay $119 when I could do a giveaway coupon through Smashwords, and post on Twitter and Facebook for FREE. There are plenty of ways to offload 100 copies of an ebook, if you really want ..."

If you give away copies free on Smashwords, you don't get whatever advertising Amazon is giving the giveaways - that's the cost to them, and that's probably why they don't do smaller amounts.


message 20: by Noorilhuda (new)

Noorilhuda Why would anyone pay $119 to send books?


message 21: by David (new)

David Joshua wrote: "The $119 fee is ridiculous and is punishing people (indie authors, particularly) for not having hard copy books. Amazon allows you to do free giveaways which is why so many people use it. I was exc..."

Well said. Yet another way of making money out of the users who provide all the content anyway.


message 22: by Ray (new)

Ray Charbonneau Why should I pay $119 to advertise for Goodreads?


message 23: by Eric (new)

Eric Mrozek This is absolutely insane when you consider that LibraryThing allows any author to do the exact same thing for FREE. You might as well go over there if you want to give away ebooks.


message 24: by Susan (new)

Susan Laine $199? Yeah, no. Few indie, self-published, or small press authors have that kind of money. And who does giveaways of a hundred e-books? Authors can't and don't do this work for free, people! We got bills to pay same as everyone else. As an experiment, GR & Amazon, you're going about this all wrong. Pass. Not going to be participating in any way, shape, or form.


message 25: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 06, 2016 01:36PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Scarletine wrote: "...And FYI - the m/m author who's tweet you posted at the top of this notice is from the UK so she can't even do a give away if she wanted to, as its US only ..."

Just for now. They never said it would stay U.S. only; just that during the beta it was and there were no exact dates for when other countries were being added. Whatdya expect a U.S. site introducing giveaway for U.S. retailer's (amazon) kindle editions to do for the beta rollout?

Eric wrote: "This is absolutely insane when you consider that LibraryThing allows any author to do the exact same thing for FREE. You might as well go over there if you want to give away ebooks."

Yes, they do. Not ARCs though (their site notes that for their early reviewer program "*Generally, self-published and vanity press books aren't accepted."). On the plus side if you can get your book in their early reviewer program, members are expected to review.

Oddly, however -- even though they allow authors to give away ebooks provided authors (not LibraryThing) distribute the ebooks -- they have only a tiny fraction of giveaways that goodreads does so are in no danger of being flooded. Nor do the LT reviews count as much when trying to get approved to do promotions with sites like Bookbub. I'd guess the LT giveaways statistics are roughly proportionate to the number of members (approx. 2 million per https://www.librarything.com/zeitgeist ) and authors (under 16,000 claimed author profiles per https://www.librarything.com/libraryt...) they have. Their lifetime total of books and ARCs given away are less than some month's giveaways on goodreads. And the site is a lot less "social media" without the oomph! of the goodreads update feed -- lots more keeping member book data viewable only to that member than even posting out to a feed things like marking a book currently reading or that you've entered a giveaway for a book; similar group activity and discussions.

And I'm not saying anything against LibraryThing or any other book site (or even particularly in favor of goodreads which I think is not what it once was for us readers). It can actually be effective in terms of takers/reviews to offer arcs, review copies, etc. on sites with fewer authors and fewer members because easier to stand out in the crowd (while hoping that LT reviewer might also echo their review to Amazon and goodreads) . But, goodreads and Amazon itself are still the sites offering most visibility to most potential readers--and most used by some promotion opportunities available to indies. Getting your book out to potentially 20+ million members versus 2+ million members...

ETA: typos & clarity.

To see how many ebooks on giveaway this month at LibraryThing see https://www.librarything.com/er_list.... (at time posted roughly 75 but unlike goodreads beta currently restricting just to one publishing house LT's is open for all their members with distribution rights to giveaway ebooks) .

If a reader considering joining LT, don't let the partial Amazon ownership or the subscription fee to catalog more than 200 books scare you off -- it's only $10 annually or $25 lifetime (and sporadically they run promotions like over the last year when they finally introduced their app that reduce or waive the membership fee). https://www.librarything.com/about


message 26: by Jimmie (new)

Jimmie When I do a free giveaway on my e-books, I look at the price as if I were giving away bookmarks or business cards. These are freebies designed to get something into the hands of readers who don't know me. Bookbub may be $300 for a Science Fiction ad for a free book, but I give away over 30,000 copies when I use them, or less than 1¢ per book to get my writing into the hands of a reader. When I do other giveaways, I track what my cost per book is and if it is above 10¢ per book, I don't use that venue again. I find great success often with places that cost me 4 to 5¢ per book.

Good reads wants to charge me $1.12 per book at the start? Not going to happen. A complete and utter waste of time and money.


message 27: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Jimmie wrote: "Good reads wants to charge me $1.12 per book at the start? Not going to happen. A complete and utter waste of time and money...."

It depends - I have read about the 'value' of free enough to know that's not the right strategy for me: people downloading books because they are free, and never reading them or reviewing.

I've run a couple of 0.99 sales, so 100 books at 0.99 isn't that far from $119.

I'll still have to look very carefully at what you get for what you pay, but am not opposed to the idea in general if I'm convinced it will put me in front of the right kinds of readers (I'm a specialized taste).

I'd have to be fairly sure it would work, though. Just giving away free books is relatively easy to do.

What has been your experience with BookBub and giving away free books? Are SF fans following through and buying your other work? Do they review?


message 28: by Katheryn (new)

Katheryn Haddad What kind of advertising do you do? Is it just to other Goodread members?


message 29: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Kindle Countdown Sales, advertised on my blog, my personal FB page, and the first couple of times to GenrePulse and EBookSoda.

I write mainstream; I don't think the genre places reach my kind of readers - and I don't think I got any sales at all from them.

EreaderNewsToday declined to let me advertise with them (not enough reviews? no space?), so I wasn't able to do that.

Advertising is tricky (less so if you write Romance or SFF or steampunk because the fans expect to buy books in the places you can advertise) for indie mainstream writers. I'm banking on an ad to the readers of the Princeton alumni magazine, in their summer books issue - you have to be connected (I was staff before retirement) to get into the issue at all, and it goes to almost 100K alumni. We'll see if it pays for the pricey ad.


message 30: by Katheryn (new)

Katheryn Haddad But what kind of advertising does Goodreads do for our $119?


message 31: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Katheryn wrote: "But what kind of advertising does Goodreads do for our $119?"

This is what we're waiting to find out - I plan to read the details and the terms of service very carefully before signing on.


message 32: by Ken (new)

Ken From the original post:

The primary benefit of running a giveaway on Goodreads is generating excitement for your book.

That sounds like it's not any different from a print giveaway. The book makes it onto the daily giveaway lists on the first and last day, but it's still up to the author to promote the giveaway.

I hope I'm wrong, though!


message 33: by Jimmie (new)

Jimmie Alicia wrote: "What has been your experience with BookBub and giving away free books? Are SF fans following through and buying your other work? Do they review?"


I make my living writing novels. My current top selling book, with a Bookbub ad last December, has 285 reviews on Amazon with a 4.1 average. The sequel, which was released about 8 months ago, has 86 reviews with a 4.5 average. Sales on both always go up after I do a giveaway. My other books also see a rise in sales after a giveaway on any of my books.

My criteria for advertising again with a company is how low of cost per giveaway I can expect. Bookbub is the absolute best, by far, as I end up with less than 1¢ per book given away. I can expect 15 to 20 reviews within a month on 30,000 books given away. On a Librarything giveaway of 100 books, I can expect 2 or 3 reviews, and on a Goodreads paperback giveaway of 5 books (I have done 4 in the last three years) I get one or two reviews. Since the Librarything giveaway is free, it only cost me less than an hour of my time. I don't do the Goodreads giveaways anymore, not enough results for the cost and effort.

Biggest bang for the buck? A good giveaway of thousands of e-books to bring in multiple reviews and a lot of attention to my novels.


message 34: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Jimmie wrote: "I make my living writing novels. M..."

I went to check what kind of novels you write, and there isn't any information on your profile nor a Goodreads Author link.

Do you write under a pseudonym? And want to keep it that way? Or are you too busy to maintain yet one more spot?

Just curious because what you write is very important to categorize your marketing plans.

I'd love to be where you are - at some point in the future - but I am not in your league: I have one book published, a couple of short things ready to go up, and it may take me five years to finish the trilogy I'm writing.

Mainstream works very differently from genre, etc. Caveats all around.

Many thanks for the information of how things work for you; I'll be curious to see your take when the details have been laid out for us to see, and we make decisions on how to spend our advertising budgets. I can't even get a BookBub at this stage, and ENT said no - without explanation. I will keep trying, but they may still not be the better strategy for me.


message 35: by Jimmie (new)

Jimmie Alicia wrote:
I went to check what kind of novels you write, and there isn't any information on your profile nor a Goodreads Author link.

Do you write under a pseudonym"


Yes, I write under the name Wilson Harp. I just published my 9th book in March. I published my first book just under 4 years ago.


message 36: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Ah, thanks. Didn't mean to out you, but 9 books and four years since being published is somewhere I hope to be at some point.


message 37: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 07, 2016 01:47PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) I hope they'll be adding more to the beta test soon. I like this idea and glad they're doing it. But not really a good beta test yet. Hopefully not being responsive on this and other threads about it just because such early stages.

Until linking an Amazon account to goodreads, goodreads readers were never in any way connected to credit card or financial information (other than a general if you use same email and passwords on all your sites and one got hacked ...). So that is a consideration -- even to pull in Amazon purchases, use goodreads integration on kindle devices and enter kindle giveaways. I do know some friends who linked only long enough to pull in books then unlinked.

With or without Amazon account linked, I'd like to be messaged or emailed a redemption code versus book showing up in kindle library/cloud. I'm not always looking there. I've had preorders show up and get overlooked for a while on kobo, nook and kindle so not sure I'd do any better with giveaway wins.

And, off topic but mention of Bookbub reminded me that while I know it's not anything goodreads can do (changing the policies of other sites) -- it really sucks how the promotion sites wanting minimum average ratings completely overlook that goodreads' rating scale is not the same as Amazon's. At least that sounds like won't be an issue for the $119 giveaway since all authors can pay to list their kindle books without rating and review minimums (plus all on goodreads unless resulting review cross posts elsewhere). Rant under (view spoiler)


message 38: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 07, 2016 02:03PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Katheryn wrote: "But what kind of advertising does Goodreads do for our $119?"

My understanding: shows it in the giveaways, just like they do for print giveaways.

You're paying for the mechanics to deliver wins and to get the exposure (just like paying to produce/ship print books for the print giveaways). Making it free could potentially flood the gr giveaway program to where it would become similar exposure/discoverability as just adding book to gr database (or Amazon data feed doing fir you) or putting the book up for sale in with millions of other books on Amazon -- free to flooding would make it as useful as just hoping someone randomly stumbles across book page searching for something else p.

Think of it as " impressions" from regular ads -- impressions to potentially millions of readers whose entering and shelving the book ("click thru" rates) also advertises it out to their friends and followers on the feed here (similar to a Facebook or other social media share except just to persons interested in books) who might also enter/shelve to advertise it out to their friends/followers, ... then any resulting reviews will also go to the feeds to do the same plus be potential praise/advertising visible on book's goodreads page.


message 39: by R.M. (new)

R.M. Donaldson Joshua wrote: "The $119 fee is ridiculous and is punishing people (indie authors, particularly) for not having hard copy books. Amazon allows you to do free giveaways which is why so many people use it. I was exc..."

Amazon does it for free? How do they do that? I SO agree that $119 is too much. That costs more than buying that many ebook copies!


message 40: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited May 13, 2016 10:28AM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) R.M. wrote: "...Amazon does it for free? How do they do that? I SO agree that $119 is too much. That costs more than buying that many ebook copies! ..."

No, not for free. Amazon allows you to purchase products (including books) to put on giveaway. You can then promote that giveaway outside of Amazon (they do provide an official Twitter hashtag you can use, suggested wording and links including links to the giveaway rules).

Not completely on topic for the announcement of goodreads giveaways now allowing kindle editions as well as print books -- but, when Amazon first implemented giveaways, I dudn't think they permitted giveaways of digital products (like kindle editions). Very recently they presumably changed to allow accounts with the digital rights to the product to purchase it and put on giveaway.

How well does Amazon advertise the giveaway for you? Well, go to their site and look for book and kindle edition giveaways to see. Try Twitter as well (start by searching hashtag #AmazonGiveaway or https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Amazo... ). Browse product page on giveaway to see how giveaway is featured or not.

ETA: link to Amazon info on their giveaways = http://www.amazon.com/gp/giveaway/home (quoted under spoiler in case link fails but please double check the source in case updated since I quoted before starting a giveaway) (view spoiler)

FAQs notes at from http://www.amazon.com/b/?_encoding=UT... "...3. What does it cost to run a giveaway? There is no additional fee to run a giveaway. As a host, you purchase prizes at the price on the Amazon.com site and pay for sales tax and any shipping to the winner(s). .." (A bit more under spoiler in case link fails) (view spoiler)

Directions on redeeming the kindle gift code if win a book from an author not using official goodreads or Amazon giveaways at https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/custom...


message 41: by Noorilhuda (new)

Noorilhuda @F.P., I started an Amazon ebook giveaway on 4th (ending on 19th), it's going well.

Good valuable discussion all around.


message 42: by James (new)

James F.P. wrote: "Have a lot of people tried the ebook Giveaway there yet? Has anyone had any success with that?"

I'm trying one now, and since it hasn't finished yet, I haven't come to any final conclusions. But one of the things I like about it is being able to offer the number of copies you choose (and pay accordingly.) One of the things I don't like is having to do all the promotion myself - making readers aware of it is difficult. Much like making them aware of my books in the first place.

That's one reason why, on balance, I think I'll like the goodreads e-book giveaway better.


message 43: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt James wrote: "I'm trying one now, and since it hasn't finished yet, I haven't come to any final conclusions. But one of the things I like about it is being able to offer the number of copies you choose (and pay accordingly.)..."

I don't understand. Is this a beta program open only to a few Amazon imprint authors, and only at $119 - or is this open to ALL authors, and 'paid accordingly'?

In other words, have I missed being one of the few to be able to try it without a lot of competition ALREADY?


message 44: by Miss M (new)

Miss M Alicia wrote: "James wrote: "I'm trying one now, and since it hasn't finished yet, I haven't come to any final conclusions. But one of the things I like about it is being able to offer the number of copies you ch..."

They switched the conversation to Amazon's own giveaway program, recently extended to include ebooks too; info on your Amazon book page. : )


message 45: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt Miss M wrote: "Alicia wrote: "James wrote: "I'm trying one now, and since it hasn't finished yet, I haven't come to any final conclusions. But one of the things I like about it is being able to offer the number o..."

Thank you so much. I'm slow, and I thought I was looking at something I didn't have access to yet, and then it seemed everyone else had it - and I was chastising myself for not catching on faster.

Many programs work better once they have a bit of exposure and a reasonable number of participants (both), so being the first isn't necessarily the best. But after a while they don't work nearly as well (permafree is an example) - because they are oversubscribed.

I know permafree works for series - many people have the first book free as a teaser - but they have, and will be writing, many more books in a series.

That isn't me. I worked a very long time on the first book, and there are two more to come - I won't ever be able to do what many indies can.


message 46: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Lush Hello!

Will the program be available to novellas of 100-120 pages (30,000 words)?

Thank you,
Tamara


message 47: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Percy $119? Surely you jest!


message 48: by Claire (new)

Claire Splan Not happy about the $119, which won't make sense for some indie authors and some titles, but this is a step in the right direction. I'm also wondering if there will be restrictions on how big the ebooks have to be? I hope you open this up soon to ebook authors and I hope you also include formats other than Kindle--actually, it's really important you include other formats!!


message 49: by Tom (new)

Tom Fallwell $119 is a slap in the face of Indie authors. I will not be using this service. Why in the world would I, the author, pay to give away my own book? I can do that for free, through social media.


message 50: by B. (last edited May 09, 2016 11:35AM) (new)

B. Morris Allen It's great that e-book giveaways are finally an option, but the reasoning for the $119 charge is thin.

The whole reason for a giveaway is to eventually increase sales of the book, which will benefit both Amazon and author in the end. Charging authors for adding to Amazon's profit is unreasonable, and almost incredible.


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