Goodreads Blog
Goodreads Blog posts (showing 1-10 of 577)
Goodreads Giveaways Just Got Even Better! Kindle Ebook Giveaways Now Available (U.S. members)
Posted by Greg Seguin on May 03, 2016

Do you love free books? How about reading a book before it’s published to the wide world? Are you one of the many Goodreads members who reads ebooks? Well, we have good news for you! Our popular Giveaways program now includes Kindle ebook giveaways. Starting today, U.S. members can enter to win Kindle ebooks, and the winners will get their copies downloaded instantly to their favorite device—no more waiting for the mailman to hurry up and make the delivery.

Many of you are already big fans of our Giveaways program. Last year alone, readers won more than 300,000 free print books on Goodreads. Giveaways are popular because you can enter to win a range of books, from the latest advance review copy (ARC) by a bestselling author to books from debut authors.

Check out the list of currently active Kindle ebook giveaways today.



I don’t have a Kindle ereader. How can I read Kindle ebooks?
Not a problem! You can read the Kindle ebooks you win using the free Kindle iOS app, the free Android app, or in a web browser using the free Kindle Cloud Reader.

Why aren’t there as many Kindle ebook giveaways listed as print book giveaways?
We’re starting off the program by working with Amazon Publishing on a closed beta. Once out of beta, the program will be open to any author or publisher who sells their ebooks on Amazon.

I like reading print books. Are you going to get rid of print book giveaways?
Not to worry, we’ll still have plenty of great print giveaways to choose from! Nothing about the print giveaway program is changing, and you’ll now be able to customize the giveaway page so that you see only the types of giveaways that interest you. You’re also welcome to enter both types of giveaways. And members outside the U.S. will still be able to enter print book giveaways for their country.

When will Kindle ebook giveaways be available outside the U.S.?
We’re starting off the program in the U.S. Our goal is to make sure that we offer all of our features in other countries, but we do not have any timing on this yet.

I’m an author/publisher and I’m interested in learning more about Kindle ebook giveaways.
Find out all the details for authors and publishers in our post on the Author & Advertisers Blog.

Feeling lucky? Head over to the Giveaways page and enter some Kindle ebook giveaways.
16 Underrated Books That Deserve Your Attention
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 30, 2016

Last week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: What's an underrated book you think everyone should read? Check out the top answers below!

I Am Pilgrim
Rate this book
Clear rating

Revolution
Rate this book
Clear rating

Open City
Rate this book
Clear rating

Theft of Swords
Rate this book
Clear rating

Run
Rate this book
Clear rating

Of Breakable Things
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Sea of Tranquility
Rate this book
Clear rating

A Trip to the Stars
Rate this book
Clear rating

Vicious
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Master and Margarita
Rate this book
Clear rating

Moloka'i
Rate this book
Clear rating

Under the Banner of Heaven
Rate this book
Clear rating

The River Wife
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Transit of Venus
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Shepherd's Life
Rate this book
Clear rating

Isles of the Forsaken
Rate this book
Clear rating


What's your favorite underrated book? Share it with us in the comments!
The Top 100 Children's Books on Goodreads!
Posted by Jessica Donaghy on April 27, 2016

Like Charlie finding his golden ticket to Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory, a child finding the right book to read opens the door to hours of joy and wonderment...and sometimes Everlasting Gobstoppers! We all have our favorites—the books we read over and over again until the pages were falling out—but which books should be on every kid's shelves? We ran the numbers on millions of titles to find the top 100 children's books according to Goodreads members!

We looked for the best reviewed books, all with average ratings above a 4.0 (a high bar that cuts out giants like Ramona and Huck Finn). This time we also decided to focus our search on chapter books and middle grade books for that magical time when a child has graduated from picture books and is reading alone, but isn't ready for YA favorites such as The Hunger Games. (For teen readers, check out our Top 100 Young Adult Books!) Of course, every child is different and no list is ever complete. What beloved book did you read to tatters when you were a kid?

How many of the 100 have you read? Tell us in the comments!

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating


How many of the 100 have you read?


Top 15 Shakespeare Quotes on Goodreads
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 22, 2016


How do we love Shakespeare? Let us count the ways. For #ShakespeareWeek, we celebrated the Bard's plays, his impact on generations of storytellers, and the writers who helped shape his work. As our week of merrymaking comes to a close, we take a look at the most beloved Shakespeare quotes here on Goodreads.


1. "The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool." -As You Like It

2. "Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none." All's Well That Ends Well

3. "Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind." -A Midsummer Night's Dream

4. "Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them." -Twelfth Night

5. "The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves." -Julius Caesar


Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating



Rate this book
Clear rating

Rate this book
Clear rating
6. "Doubt thou the stars are fire;
Doubt that the sun doth move;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
But never doubt I love."-Hamlet

7. "This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man." -Hamlet

8. "There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so." -Hamlet

9. "If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die." -Twelfth Night

10. "Hell is empty and all the devils are here." -The Tempest

11. "When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun." -Romeo and Juliet

12. "We know what we are, but not what we may be." -Hamlet

13. "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages." -As You Like It

14. "You speak an infinite deal of nothing." -The Merchant of Venice

15. "Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come." -Julius Caesar



What's your favorite Shakespeare quote? Tell us in the comments!
(Top image credit: David Tennant in the PBS's Hamlet)

Who Inspired Shakespeare?
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 21, 2016


Shakespeare is still everywhere, 400 years after his death. Claire Underwood channels Lady Macbeth on House of Cards, shades of King Lear weave through Empire, and Game of Thrones's warring families embrace the cutthroat politics of Richard III. And those are just the television shows. We're treated to new film adaptations of the Bard's plays nearly every year, and you can fill a whole library with the books his stories inspired.

But what about Shakespeare himself? When he sat down, quill in hand, whose words were running through his head? In honor of #ShakespeareWeek, we did the research and found five writers who helped shape Shakespeare's work. Check them out for yourself! If they inspired the Bard to write, imagine what they could do for you.


Ovid
Rate this book
Clear rating

Picture Shakespeare as a young boy, wading through dense Latin prose. Roman poet Ovid's Metamorphoses was likely a part of the Bard's school program, and its powerful theme of transformation followed Shakespeare into adulthood.
Ovid: "Chance is always powerful. Let your hook be always cast; in the pool where you least expect it, there will be a fish."


Rate this book
Clear rating
Plutarch
Shakespeare was quite fond of a 1579 translation of Greek writer Plutarch's Parallel Lives. And by "quite fond" we mean that the Bard, on more than one occasion, stuck some of Plutarch's lines directly into his own plays. (Our modern concept of plagiarism wasn't around then.)
Plutarch: "I don't need a friend who changes when I change and who nods when I nod; my shadow does that much better."


Geoffrey Chaucer
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Canterbury Tales, English poet Chaucer's most famous work, is really a story about stories. Not only did Shakespeare explore this theme in his own plays, he also wrote The Two Noble Kinsmen, a retelling of Chaucer's The Knight's Tale.
Chaucer: "What is better than wisdom? Woman. And what is better than a good woman? Nothing."


Rate this book
Clear rating
Raphael Holinshed
A big history buff, Shakespeare turned to English chronicler Holinshed's books for inspiration. As a result, Holinshed's research was the source of most of the Bard's history plays, including Macbeth.
Holinshed: "It is dangerous (gentle reader) to range in so large a field as I have here undertaken…"



Christopher Marlowe
Rate this book
Clear rating

Well, let's get one thing out of the way: Some people believe that Marlowe wrote most of the plays we now attribute to Shakespeare. While modern analysis suggests this theory is not true, there's no denying the similarity between the two English playwrights' work.
Marlowe: "Why should you love him whom the world hates so? Because he love me more than all the world."



What writers inspire you? Tell us in the comments!
All research done by resident Goodreads and Shakespeare expert Carla Quesada
Top image credit: Shakespeare in Love


9 Famous Book Titles Based on Shakespeare Lines
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 20, 2016

Authors have been finding book title inspiration in the Bard's verses for centuries: four centuries, to be exact! For #ShakespeareWeek, we've collected a few contemporary examples. From a dystopian thriller to a young adult tearjerker, these are the stories Shakespeare has inspired from beyond the grave. How many have you read?


INFINITE JEST
Rate this book
Clear rating
by David Foster Wallace
"Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite
jest
, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his back a
thousand times, and now how abhorr'd in my imagination it is!
My gorge rises at it."

From Hamlet


Rate this book
Clear rating
BRAVE NEW WORLD
by Aldous Huxley

"Oh, wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in 't!"

From The Tempest


WYRD SISTERS
Rate this book
Clear rating
by Terry Pratchett
"Saw you the weird sisters?"

From Macbeth


Rate this book
Clear rating
ON SUCH A FULL SEA
by Chang-rae Lee

"On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures."

From Julius Caesar


THE SOUND AND THE FURY
Rate this book
Clear rating
by William Faulkner
"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."

From Macbeth


THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
Rate this book
Clear rating
by John Green
"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings."

From Julius Caesar


SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES
Rate this book
Clear rating
by Ray Bradbury
"By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes."

From Macbeth


Rate this book
Clear rating
PALE FIRE
by Vladimir Nabokov

"And her pale fire she snatches from the sun:
The sea's a thief, whose liquid surge resolves
The moon into salt tears: the earth's a thief,
That feeds and breeds by a composture stolen."

From Timon of Athens


SOMETHING ROTTEN
Rate this book
Clear rating
by Jasper Fforde
"Something is rotten in the state of Denmark."

From Hamlet



If you had to name a book using a Shakespeare line, what title would you choose?
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for #ShakespeareWeek updates.

What Shakespeare Play Should I Read? An Infographic
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 19, 2016

In honor of #ShakespeareWeek, try our helpful infographic to find out what celebrated play you should read next.



Where did you end up—comedy, history, or tragedy?
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for #ShakespeareWeek updates.
It's Shakespeare Week on Goodreads!
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 18, 2016



But, soft! What light through yonder internet browser window breaks? It's our Shakespeare Week celebration on Goodreads—and you, fair reader, are invited!

April 23 is the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death. To mark this momentous anniversary, we're pulling out all the stops for the Bard this week—just take a look at our logo! We'll be featuring Shakespeare-themed quizzes, book lists, writing prompts, and games. In addition, amazing authors who have written books based on the Bard's plays are taking your questions about comedy and tragedy…and everything in between. (Bonus points for questions in iambic pentameter.)

To kick off the festivities, we asked six authors to write a deleted scene from one of the Bard's plays. (Check them out below!) On Tuesday, we helped you answer the question, Which Shakespeare play should I read next?; on Wednesday, we took a look at famous book titles based on Shakespeare lines; and on Thursday, we investigated the writers who influenced Shakespeare. What's up next? Come back to find out!


Ian Doescher, author of William Shakespeare's Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)


Jasper Fforde, author of the Hamlet-inspired Something Rotten:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)


Margaret Atwood, author of Hag-Seed, a retelling of The Tempest:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)


Malorie Blackman, author of the Othello-inspired Chasing the Stars:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)


Elizabeth Nunez, author of Even in Paradise, a retelling of King Lear:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)


Christopher Moore, author of Fool, a retelling of King Lear:
(Read the full deleted scene here.)



Now it's your turn! Write your own deleted scene from a Shakespeare play in the comments and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for #ShakespeareWeek updates.
7 Delightful Beverly Cleary Quotes to Celebrate Her 100th Birthday
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 12, 2016



Happy birthday, Beverly Cleary! The beloved author of Beezus and Ramona, The Mouse and the Motorcycle, and Henry Huggins turns 100 today. From working as a librarian to spinning tales of youthful adventure, Clearly has dedicated her life to the magic of stories. To help celebrate her birthday, we've rounded up her top quotes on Goodreads. Which one is your favorite?

1. "She was not a slowpoke grownup. She was a girl who could not wait. Life was so interesting she had to find out what happened next."


Rate this book
Clear rating
2. "If she can't spell, why is she a librarian? Librarians should know how to spell."

3. "Quite often somebody will say, 'What year do your books take place?' and the only answer I can give is, in childhood."

4. "If you don't see the book you want on the shelves, write it."

5. "Words were so puzzling. Present should mean a present just as attack should mean to stick tacks in people."

6. "Didn't the people who made those license plates care about little girls named Ramona?"

7. "She means well, but she always manages to do the wrong thing. She has a real talent for it."


Are you a Beverly Cleary fan? Share your experience with her books in the comments!
16 Perfect Books to Curl Up with on a Rainy Day
Posted by Hayley Igarashi on April 09, 2016


Storms don't bother us. As long as we have a book in hand and a hot beverage nearby, we're in reading paradise. Last week we asked on Facebook and Twitter: What's the perfect book to read on a rainy day? Your top answers are below!


American Gods
Rate this book
Clear rating

Spellbinder
Rate this book
Clear rating

Cold Sassy Tree
Rate this book
Clear rating

Wuthering Heights
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Thirteenth Tale
Rate this book
Clear rating

Little Women
Rate this book
Clear rating

And Then There Were None
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Sword of Shannara
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Secret of the Old Clock
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Woman in Black
Rate this book
Clear rating

Man's Searching for Meaning
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Secret Garden
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Last Time We Say Goodbye
Rate this book
Clear rating

My Man Jeeves
Rate this book
Clear rating

Hopeless
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Bad Beginning
Rate this book
Clear rating


What's your quintessential rainy day read? Tell us in the comments!
(Top image credit: Becoming Jane)

« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 57 58