Super Readers Share Their Best Tips to Read More Books

Posted by Cybil on December 30, 2019
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Sometimes it seems hard to make time for those things you really want to do more of, like our favorite activity: Reading.

As we head into New Year's resolutions season, we'd like to make the case for our favorite and most fun resolution: Making more time for reading. To help you out, we thought we'd reach out to some Goodreads members who manage to read an impressive number of books each year and ask them for their best advice. You can also see their up-to-date reading for 2019 under their names!

We want to hear your tips and tricks as well! Let us know how you carve out time to read!


Tips to Read More


 
Miranda Reads

See Miranda's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

My reading goal for this year was 240 books.

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

Audiobooks! More specifically—free audiobooks. As someone who loves to read, it can be hard to find the time—especially once I enrolled in graduate school. The first few months were so jarring—I loved the academic challenge and the rigorous coursework, but all of my free time was suddenly gone. And as someone who used to average a book every two days, I really missed reading.

My local librarian came up with the solution. She told me to try downloading audiobooks (or ebooks) from my state's digital library. My state had thousands of books available in their digital format, ready to be downloaded right to my phone! I was hooked—speeding my way through The Raven Boys, Harry Potter, Michelle Obama's Becoming, and so many more.

Now, whenever I'm in the car, doing chores about the house, walking from place to place, etc., I always have a book playing. I've laughed and cried my way though (no exaggeration) hundreds of audiobooks within the last few years and will likely go through hundreds more in the future.

Roughly 60 percent of the books I read are audiobooks and the best part is I never have to shift my schedule or try to squeeze in more reading time when the book is really good. I just continue working on my instrument, taking data or editing my figures—all while finding out if Mia will survive the Nevernight Chronicles (don't tell me—I have six hours of the audiobook remaining!).

Tips to Read More



Melanie Parker/Meltotheany

See Melanie Parker/Meltotheany's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

100

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

I know it’s cliché, but my greatest advice for reading more is just to make time for reading. I don’t go anywhere without a book, whether that is a physical book, my iPad, or an audiobook on my iPhone. Reading before bed is also just a part of my nightly routine now, and I really cherish that downtime and look forward to it each day!

Also, never forget your love for reading. I think sometimes we get so caught up with numbers (and reviews) that it’s easy to forget how amazing it is to escape into stories and then be able to share that experience with friends here on Goodreads!

Tips to Read More



Jennifer Tar Heel Reader

See Jennifer Tar Heel Reader's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

I expect to read 250 books this year

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

I take a book, my Kindle, and the Kindle app on my phone with me everywhere, and I read any chance I get. I’ve also recently gotten back into audiobooks and have the libro.fm app on my phone to sneak in audiobooks on my commute or during household chores.

Lastly, I watch very little TV. The less TV I watch, the more I read, and the more I read, the more relaxed I am!

Tips to Read More



Jessica

See Jessica's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

I am on track for hitting 365 books read for my second year in a row. While there are many contributing factors in my personal life that allow me to read as much as I do (which may not be applicable to other readers), it really can be summed up in one statement—I read what I enjoy.

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

This may seem like common sense, but I cannot stress how important it is to read books that interest you. I can get through 400 pages of fantasy in a day, but 75 pages on socioeconomic growth would take me weeks to read.

Additionally, if you aren’t enjoying a book, don’t force yourself to finish it. It’s not quitting or a failure to set a book aside if you hate it. Duds happen. So rather than struggling, wouldn’t you rather be spending that time reading something you do enjoy? Once I personally accepted that it’s okay to not finish a book, my reading experience improved significantly.

In short, read what you love and love what you read. Do this and, if you’re anything like me, you will be reading more books than you can probably manage.

Tips to Read More



Kai

See Kai's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

Since I've already reached my goal of 75 books this year, I might try and aim for the big 100. It's ambitious, but I might just make it.

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

Here are a few things that totally count as reading:

1. Audiobooks

2. Graphic Novels

3. Fanfiction

4. And yes, even picture books. 100 percent valid.

Still, there are a few things that help me read more. I try not to read more than two books at a time. Granted, I usually fail at doing that. One book for pleasure and one for pain—often something I have to read for class. And then there's a third option: a buddy read, a poetry collection that I will pick up occasionally, or a graphic novel that simply reads much quicker.

And while we're at it: comics and graphic novels do read themselves much faster than novels. And YA reads itself faster than adult fiction. And 300 pages take much less time than any George R.R. Martin book ever. If on the last day of the year you're one book away from making the finish line, Rupi Kaur is your woman. Or Dean Atta. Even the Rainbow Fish.

Something else that helps me is to go all Marie Kondo on books that don't bring me joy. It's boring? Bye. Can't connect? Sashay away. It's problematic? Well...I'll probably finish it just so I can write a scathing review. But feel free to throw it out with the trash.

A few last words: Don't forget that reading should be fun. Fast readers usually a) have a lot of free time b) work in publishing c) study literature or d) have a devilish talent to devour books in mere hours.

Don't put yourself under pressure just to lose the joy of reading. Breathe, pick up that book you've been dying to read, and forget the world around you. That's all that matters.

Tips to Read More



Sam Shove

See Sam Shove's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

I'm probably going to manage 250 books this year but normally average between 175 and 200, depending on what I read.

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

For me, I find reading more than one book at a time helps me read more. I make sure the books I'm reading are from different genres so I always have something to read that suits my mood and alternatives for when I hit a slow spot in one book. For example, at the moment I'm reading a fantasy novel and a crime thriller and will probably be starting a non-fiction that I picked up on the weekend this evening. It seems counterintuitive but seems to work for me.

Tips to Read More



Chaima

See Chaima's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

I'm hoping to read 200 books this year I've read 173 so far, and quite reassuringly, Goodreads tells me that I'm 7 books ahead of schedule!

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

Keep a book on you all the time. Sometimes, right before you leave the house, you’ll halt on the threshold and hear a voice saying, “Maybe you don’t need to take a book with you to the grocery store...” That’s the devil talking. Always have a book on deck. Trust me, I learned that lesson the hard way, but you don’t have to!

It’s okay to DNF a book. It’s okay to be picky about how you spend your reading time. I used to feel so bad about not finishing books, but I learned that once you find yourself crawling across every sentence with the peak of each hard-won page unveiling yet another page beyond, the words floating under your gaze, incomprehensible, and the boredom of it all almost bleeding your brain front to back—it’s time to stop. Give it to a friend or move onto the next title—but don’t read books you don’t enjoy.

Also, don’t shy away from reading books concurrently. I love to mix up multiple books from different genres across multiple mediums (happily switching between physical copies, e-books and audiobooks), or juggle both required reading and pleasure reading. This really helped me—someone with ADHD who has the attention span of a commercial break—plow through my TBR pile faster.

Join the Goodreads’ Reading Challenge! I am fortunate enough to be surrounded by a community dedicated to books, filled with those who feel just as giddy with enthusiasm as I do about setting reading goals, who will encourage you and remind you that “you got this!” and also help stir your motivation when you see how much they’re reading. It’s a really fun challenge, but it also helps you hold yourself accountable because Goodreads lets you know if you’re ahead, behind, or right on track to meet the reading goal you set.

Last but not least, you can’t just find time for reading, you have to determinedly carve out time in your schedule to read. Setting a dedicated reading time will help make reading a habit, and ensure that you’re reading at least an hour every day. I like to read in the mornings, so I wake up a little bit earlier and set aside 20-30 minutes to read my book—it’s a great way to start your day!—or sometimes at night, when I can’t marshal my tired eyes to the task of squinting at the pages after a particularly wearying day, nothing gladdens my heart more than listening to an audiobook while cocooned in a warm blanket.

I also claw hungrily at any spare moment to read—you’d be amazed at the number of intervals throughout the day in which you can pursue the joy of reading! Tips to Read More



Lola

See Lola's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

I am hoping to read 200 books even if I set my Goodreads goal to 220.

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

If you want to read more, try to read between tasks or events happening in your daily life. Like if you need to take a 15-minute bus ride to get to your workplace and back, read then! If after washing the dishes for 30 minutes you need to sit down and relax for 5 minutes, read then! If you're attending a salsa class and you're feeling awkward while waiting for the class to start, read then! You might fall off your chair discovering how many opportunities to read you actually have…and then read while getting back on your feet.

Tips to Read More



Emily Fox

See Emily Fox's Year in Books

How many books did you expect to read in 2019?

Hoping to make it to 100 (but 90 would be nice!)

What advice do you have for people who want to read more in 2020?

Audiobooks! They're a lifesaver for whenever life gets crazy. I can listen to one in the shower, on the bus, while cleaning, cooking, walking, getting ready... Even when I don't have time to sit down and read, I end up finishing a couple books a month that way.



We want to hear your tips and tricks as well! Let's talk books in the comments!

Check out more recent articles:
Goodreads Staffers' Top Three Books of the Year
Very Short, 4-Star Books for Your Reading Challenge
The Most Popular Books About Books for Avid Readers

Comments Showing 1-50 of 241 (241 new)


message 1: by Mahdiyeh (new)

Mahdiyeh 20 book


färbe mich rot I really need to get on this audiobook trend.


message 3: by Valentina (new)

Valentina Coppola 250 books? 365 books? Honestly, these numbers are hard to believe...


message 4: by Paul (new)

Paul O’Neill I really don't the pressure these articles put on readers. Honestly, just read what you want to read at a pace that suits you. Not everyone has the time. My 64 books I've read this year looks poultry in comparison, but the numbers really don't matter.

Piling the pressure on for people to read more, and feel less adequate because they haven't reached triple figures for the year is going to turn people off.

It's simple. If you enjoy reading, then read. Whether you read five books or five gazillion, you're still a chum of mines.


message 5: by Deyth (new)

Deyth Banger Hey Jess... great... fucking great one... 365


message 6: by Dawnlouise1987 (new)

Dawnlouise1987 Jessica obviously doesn't have a job...or leaves the house...or stops reading EVER


message 7: by Suz (new)

Suz I'm fortunate enough to have a lifestyle that enables me to pay attention to books even if it's an audiobook (which nearly tripled my annual totals). If I had to sit at a desk all day paying attention to figures on a screen, or taking care of patients, etc., I wouldn't be able to pay attention to an audiobook. I don't watch TV (I HATE advertising and commercials) so I've always got a book going whether it's audio or ebook (I rarely read hard copy due to physical limitations). As mentioned in above tips, I also keep several going at once, usually of differing genres so I can keep them apart in my head. Also, I track everything so short stories, novellas, manga, and graphic novels all get counted. People say "wow!" when they see my totals and I think "yeah, but 50 of that is comic books".

I always set my reading challenge to 100 but it's so I can hit the goal and get the profile badge for the year, which turns out to be an easy-to-access way to view reading history. This year I'm at 257 on December 30. I may get two more in before the year is out. Maybe.

For me it's not a quest to do more, it's about keeping track of what I have read, which conveniently also gives me totals. I read for pleasure and have no interest in turning it into a competitive sport. :)


message 8: by Rasha (new)

Rasha I've read 43 because I was busy with other things during the first months of the year and then I got back to reading books seriously... I think my advice to read more is to make this activity as a priority, take books with you wherever you go and it's better if they are e-books, to read faster pick short books or graphic novels and Manga. Don't pressure yourself and it's better to not set reading challenges that aren't realistic because you'll be obliged to read more like a robot and you'll forget about the joy of reading or how it feels to be completely immersed in a good book.


message 9: by jessica (last edited Dec 30, 2019 04:10AM) (new)

jessica Deyth wrote: "Hey Jess... great... fucking great one... 365"

hey thanks, friend! i hope you have an awesome day! :D


Dawnlouise1987 wrote: "Jessica obviously doesn't have a job...or leaves the house...or stops reading EVER"

i made that specification to point out that everyones lifestyles are different and there is no pressure to read mass amounts if you simply dont have the time or have other priorities. reading is not competitive.

fortunately, i have a stable job that has flexible hours. i also have a daily train commute of about two hours round trip that allows a wonderful opportunity to read. reading is also my primary source of entertainment - so instead of watching an hour or two of a show on netflix every night like some people, i read.

i have a wonderful life and am so happy that reading is such a massive part of it.


message 10: by Radiantflux (last edited Dec 30, 2019 04:20AM) (new)

Radiantflux I finally cracked 100 books last year, and just finished my 140th yesterday. I can strongly recommend audiobooks. I like reading paper/ebooks too, but there are lots of time in the day when I simply don't have the opportunity to read—washing dishes, hanging up clothes, walking in the morning—and at those times audiobooks are perfect. I find as long as the task is physical, but not too demanding audiobooks work really well, in fact it's easier to listen to when you are doing something low-level physical (I know some people knit while listening). I've have also increased the speed slowly over the last few year and now regularly listen at 1.75x-2.0x which makes the average book I read about 5-10 hours long. Now if I gave up podcasts and Netflix/Amazon-Prime I could really see myself heading for 200 bpy but that would probably make my head explode.

BTW: In addition to Audible I have an account with Storytel (here in Germany) which offers audiobook subscription model (15 euros/month for unlimited listening). It's offerings are not as extensive as Audible, but it's has enough interesting books to save me a lot of money.


message 11: by Mattis (new)

Mattis I don't have time to read - too busy watching YouTube five hours every night.


message 12: by Amy (new)

Amy Woods I pretty much don’t do much else for entertainment, and I have a hard time connecting to tv shows enough, so I predominantly use books as entertainment. And I take a book with me most places. So I should hit 171 books read this year.


message 13: by Sasha (new)

Sasha Hahaha I was just happy with my 25.. Do the reading that matters to you :)


message 14: by TMR (last edited Dec 30, 2019 05:28AM) (new)

TMR I love the tips, it will for sure help me in 2020’s reading challenge.


message 15: by Yacoob (new)

Yacoob Valentina wrote: "250 books? 365 books? Honestly, these numbers are hard to believe..."

I think I can hit those numbers easily if I read one volume of manga a day. Manga tend to be fast reads so it's even possible to read more than that.
For other types of books not so much, for fiction, I think I can read one book a week max, non fiction will take longer probably depending on how interesting the subject matter is.


message 16: by Michelle (new)

Michelle I think grab any time you have to read, even in the five minutes waiting for a bus. Just don't be like me and it means you miss the bus!


message 17: by ☆ Katie ☆ (new)

☆ Katie ☆ I'm going to read 97 books this year, which far exceeded my expectations. A portion of them are Amazon short stories or graphic novels, but none of them are audiobooks because I have just as many podcasts that I want to listen to (a number of which are related to books and reading, to find more to add to my TBR list). For 2020, I'm looking forward to doing the Reading Women challenge (26 books) as well as knocking out a large number of books in my collection.


message 18: by Nicola (last edited Dec 30, 2019 06:44AM) (new)

Nicola De Filippo Audio is listening not reading. Children four years old can listen but he doesn't read. I really don't understand how is possible to say: I listen to the audiobook so i read a book. It's not true.


message 19: by Anna (new)

Anna As a busy student, I'm at 333 books so far this year and think I'll have time for a couple more (and I don't count books that I read for school assignments and wouldn't want to pick up on my own). A lot of it is just naturally being a fast reader, but I think it also comes down to what you read. I read mostly middle grade and YA, and I love graphic novels, which are pretty quick. I also count books that were a DNF or skim, and I seem to do that more often than most people. I figure, if I put the time into trying to get into it, it was still reading, and I still like to keep track of it. It looks like I had 81 DNF/skims this year, which seems high, but I think the key to reading a lot is to know what you like and what you don't like, and if you find you aren't liking something to just move along.


message 20: by Kim (new)

Kim Maybe I'm a purist or something, but listening to an audiobook is not the same as reading a book.


message 21: by Paul (new)

Paul O’Neill Nicola wrote: "Audio is listening not reading. Children four years old can listen but he doesn't read. I really don't understand how is possible to say: I listen to the audiobook so i read a book. It's not true."

I think you'll find that's not right. The written word is literally a representation of the spoken word, and studies show that your brain absorbs reading or listening in the same way.

Fair enough it's easier to get distracted when listening to a book, so you have to train yourself to pay attention, but that's no different than when you're eyeballing the words.

Just a different technique to absorb the world's stories.


message 22: by Radiantflux (last edited Dec 30, 2019 08:23AM) (new)

Radiantflux Kim: Maybe I'm a purist or something, but listening to an audiobook is not the same as reading a book.

Audio books involve listening, paper books involve looking—they both involve reading—if reading is defined as decoding symbols in a tome and subsequently dealing with the semantics of the text.

These arguments about what really is reading always seem to pivot upon some unseen normative dimension (i.e., that you only a good reader if you read physical books—and sometimes even reading an ebook rather than a paper book is seen as questionable). And let's not start a discussion of whether graphic novels, fan fiction, bloody pulp thrillers or bodice rippers can even be counted as proper books in their own right.


message 23: by Suz (new)

Suz Yeah, I really hope this doesn't degenerate into an "are audiobooks really books" argument. It's so tired, and the studies are out there that have proven over and over again that yes, audiobooks are really books at least from the reader's experience mentally, emotionally, and physiologically. Comparable systems and areas in the brain get used whether listening or reading, and while some people may find they have to retrain themselves to focus on audio once that's done then it's physiologically a comparable experience to reading text, only you can get your laundry, dishes, yard work, workout, and commute done while you're doing it.


message 24: by Jake (new)

Jake Stories were spoken before they were written. Keep that in mind if you're of the opinion that audio is less legitimate than print.


message 25: by Cindy (new)

Cindy I have read 368 so far and will finish probably 2 more before the 1st. My best advice is to always have a book with you, read every chance you can even if it's just a couple of pages, and audiobooks can be amazing.


message 26: by Cindy (new)

Cindy And why does this have to devolve into a convo between what genres are real reading and audiobooks are not reading. Get over yourselves! I'm a librarian. I want people to read no matter what genre, no matter how it is consumed. Ask a teacher (most of which encourage at least 20 minutes of reading a day), they will tell you that listening is just as important as reading the words yourself. Get over it. Reading is reading, all genres are important and real. Anyone who says otherwise, is sitting on a high horse that they will tumble off of when they get older and can no longer read a physical book, but have rely on audiobooks.


message 27: by NightLights (new)

NightLights I've been reading a lot lately. This helped me eradicate a few addictions like Youtube, Binging on tv series or playing League of Legends. I've got rid of these addictions and picked up a new one.. which is drinking coffee (and farting like a maniac).


message 28: by Sophie (new)

Sophie Paul wrote: "I really don't the pressure these articles put on readers. Honestly, just read what you want to read at a pace that suits you. Not everyone has the time. My 64 books I've read this year looks poult..."

My thoughts exactly. It's not a race!


message 29: by Kate (new)

Kate I love reading and am definitely one of those people ranting about how all of society should read more, but this article seemed to put a bit too much focus on, "the higher the number, the better!" I worry about with the Goodreads challenge, too. Reading 100 books is not inherently better than reading 10, if the 100 were rushed through and didn't challenge you or make you think. Slowing down and reading 10 that you truly love, that push you and make you think - that make you stop and ponder the beauty of words, might be better. Quality over quantity should not be forgotten. It's so tempting to think, "Oh, I have to read more to meet my goal this year!" Sure, but that's an arbitrary goal. WHY do you want to read more? Make sure your # target is still serving your core reasons for loving books.

(And, to be clear: still mad props to those who manage to hit high numbers!)


message 30: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa färbe mich rot wrote: "I really need to get on this audiobook trend."

Do it. I recommend Six of Crows (YA), The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (Historical Fiction), Sadie (Thriller), Red Rising (Sci-Fi), I'll Be Gone in the Dark (True Crime).

Both Audible and Libro offer free trials. Scribd is cheaper, but limits how much you can listen to. And your local library if you have one has a feature called Libby where you can borrow audiobooks and listen on your phone if you have a library membership.

Sorry for the info dump! Hope it helps.


message 31: by A.J. (new)

A.J. Sefton Kim wrote: "Maybe I'm a purist or something, but listening to an audiobook is not the same as reading a book." Totally agree. Yes, you are 'experiencing' the story but not reading. LISTENING is not the same as READING.


message 32: by Vanessa (last edited Dec 30, 2019 08:53AM) (new)

Vanessa My guess is that the average length books takes between 8-12 hours to finish, but I read in short 15-30 minute bursts. If I could sit down and read for 4 hours straight I'd probably finish a book every 2 days. If only I could train my brain to focus on reading that long.

Last year I read roughly 52 books. This year I'm at around 64. However, the page count is nearly the same because I read more novellas, poetry, and graphic novels. It's a matter of quality versus quantity. In theory, I read MORE books but I actually read roughly the same amount as last year.


message 33: by Figgitus (new)

Figgitus Valentina wrote: "250 books? 365 books? Honestly, these numbers are hard to believe..."

I've read about 275 books across all genres this year and could have read more - those numbers are definitely doable.


message 34: by Jan (new)

Jan Richardson Sorry, for me comic books & audio books don’t count, otherwise I’ll just put in all the films of books I’ve seen.
I would say go at your own pace and don’t be put off by the ridiculous figures on here. Reading is about fun, pleasure and relaxation, not for bragging about how many books you haven’t actually read!!!


message 35: by Bill (new)

Bill Kill your TV. (Okay, just turn it off.) Get a good lamp. Put your distracting telephone in a different room. Ready, go!


message 36: by Michael (new)

Michael If listening to a story is "reading", then is watching a movie of the book also reading? Where do you draw the line? And who gets to draw that line? All I know is that if one of my students claimed to have read a book when he/she had listened to the audiobook, they would most definitely not be getting credit for that assignment.


message 37: by Melissa (last edited Jan 01, 2020 12:19PM) (new)

Melissa MacKenzie Nicola wrote: "Audio is listening not reading. Children four years old can listen but he doesn't read. I really don't understand how is possible to say: I listen to the audiobook so i read a book. It's not true."

I have to disagree. Audiobooks are so helpful for those who have reading disabilities and listening to the story is just as important as reading the story. i find this helpful for my students. Plus as you are walking and working out it can help you learn alot and that will lead to reading and encouraging you to read.


message 38: by Holly (new)

Holly My biggest dilemma with reading is finding books I want to read. If I read all 200 books on my 'to-read' shelf this year, there would be nothing left; so I'll just pace myself and hope for better days from the publishing industry.


message 39: by Tricia (new)

Tricia Sean I read in the morning before anyone else is up. I also read during my bus commute. My goal is 18 this year.


message 40: by capturada (new)

capturada 365? 🧐


message 41: by Eleanor (new)

Eleanor Paul wrote: "My 64 books I've read this year looks poultry in comparison"

Don't let yourself be henpecked.


message 42: by Sophie (new)

Sophie Eleanor wrote: "Paul wrote: "My 64 books I've read this year looks poultry in comparison"

Don't let yourself be henpecked."


LOL!!!


message 43: by Paula (new)

Paula Scott färbe mich rot wrote: "I really need to get on this audiobook trend."
I’m not good at listening to audio. I am a teacher, so don’t have time to read all the time. I do take my ebooks with me everywhere. I’m too busy at work to read on the job, but read just about everywhere else. My problem this year has been eying to finish books I don’t enjoy.


message 44: by Eleanor (new)

Eleanor Audio-book problem nobody's addressing: English-language audiobooks are pretty much always read by Americans or people with RP accents. It throws me off. Unless it's a book situated entirely among Americans or people of the RP-speaking social class in England. And most books I read aren't situated there.


message 45: by Debbie (new)

Debbie I take reading material with me wherever I go! I read a physical book this morning while waiting for my prescription to be filled. I listened to an audio-book on my drive to and from town. I started listening to audio-books this year, and it has really helped bring my TBR list down. As for those nay-sayers regarding audio-books, check out the TONS of research (which I have since I'm a teacher) that say listening to reading is GOOD for you! Last but not least, I will stop reading these posts and get back to reading my book! :)


message 46: by Suz (new)

Suz A movie is the director/screenwriter/and producer's vision. An audiobook is the author's vision with the possible influence of the actor/narrator. A movie has composite characters, added or removed secondary arcs, sometimes the story doesn't even resemble the book. An audiobook is the book, read by another human.

Apples and oranges, folks.

I can only assume the folks who think listening to audiobooks isn't reading have never actually listened to any.


message 47: by Suzy (new)

Suzy I am at 73 books this year. I love audiobooks. To me authors write books to tell a story. I am pretty sure author could care less how that story is consumed (through the written word or the spoken word). It still has to be comprehended and interpreted. Also, my heart belongs to the often overlooked middle grade novels. Some of the best books I have ever read are middle grades. They are often shorter and easier to finish a bunch of them in a year. I stagger my longer adult reads with quick middle grade reads. I don’t add picture books into my totals just because I would spend more time entering the titles then actually reading them!


message 48: by Radiantflux (last edited Dec 30, 2019 10:07AM) (new)

Radiantflux Capturada: Here's an example of someone who read 365 books in a year the old fashioned way:

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/12/ny...

As I remember the story, she did this while continuing to work and raise her children. She did it as a way of coping with the grief of the death of her sister.


message 49: by Sabrina (new)

Sabrina Well, yes, we all have the same 24 hours in a day, however, not all of us have the same commitments with those 24 hours. I read a lot more than my best friend. She has a job where she has to work 12 hour days (not including commute time) and 2 children. I have neither of those things. I actually do have more time to read than she does.


message 50: by Melanie (new)

Melanie 💗💗💗


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