Paul R. Ehrlich


Born
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The United States
May 29, 1932

Genre


Paul Ralph Ehrlich is an American biologist and educator who is the Bing Professor of Population Studies in the department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University and president of Stanford's Center for Conservation Biology. By training he is an entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera (butterflies), but he is better known as an ecologist and a demographer, specifically for his warnings about unchecked population growth and limited resources. Ehrlich became a household name after publication of his controversial 1968 book The Population Bomb.

Average rating: 3.81 · 2,256 ratings · 284 reviews · 80 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Population Bomb

3.30 avg rating — 368 ratings — published 1968 — 16 editions
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Birder's Handbook: A Field ...

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4.37 avg rating — 224 ratings — published 1988 — 3 editions
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Human Natures: Genes, Cultu...

3.82 avg rating — 159 ratings — published 2000 — 5 editions
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The Dominant Animal: Human ...

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3.58 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 2008 — 6 editions
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The Population Explosion

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3.91 avg rating — 90 ratings — published 1990 — 6 editions
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One With Nineveh: Politics,...

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3.74 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 2004 — 4 editions
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The Cold and the Dark: The ...

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4.04 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1984 — 8 editions
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Hope on Earth: A Conversation

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3.61 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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Betrayal of Science and Rea...

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3.88 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 1996 — 4 editions
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Humanity on a Tightrope: Th...

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3.78 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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“Trying to separate the contributions of nature and nurture to an attribute is rather like trying to separate the contributions of length and width to the area of a rectangle, which at first glance also seems easy. When you think about it carefully, though, it proves impossible.”
Paul R. Ehrlich, Human Natures: Genes, Cultures, and the Human Prospect

“Few problems are less recognized, but more important than, the accelerating disappearance of the earth's biological resources. In pushing other species to extinction, humanity is busy sawing off the limb on which it is perched.”
Paul Ehrlich

“The history of the knowledge of the phenomena of life and of the organized world can be divided into two main periods. For a long time anatomy, and particularly the anatomy of the human body, was the a and ? of scientific knowledge. Further progress only became possible with the discovery of the microscope. A long time had yet to pass until through Schwann the cell was established as the final biological unit. It would mean bringing coals to Newcastle were I to describe here the immeasurable progress which biology in all its branches owes to the introduction of this concept of the cell. For this concept is the axis around which the whole of the modem science of life revolves.”
Paul Ehrlich

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