Robin DiAngelo



Average rating: 4.48 · 21,409 ratings · 3,540 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
White Fragility: Why It’s S...

4.49 avg rating — 20,529 ratings — published 2018 — 12 editions
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What Does It Mean to Be Whi...

4.55 avg rating — 399 ratings — published 2012 — 7 editions
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White Fragility, Why Are Al...

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4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings
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White Fragility, Natives, B...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Is Everyone Really Equal?: ...

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4.12 avg rating — 473 ratings — published 2011 — 8 editions
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“It is white people’s responsibility to be less fragile; people of color don’t need to twist themselves into knots trying to navigate us as painlessly as possible.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

“I believe that white progressives cause the most daily damage to people of color. I define a white progressive as any white person who thinks he or she is not racist, or is less racist, or in the “choir,” or already “gets it.” White progressives can be the most difficult for people of color because, to the degree that we think we have arrived, we will put our energy into making sure that others see us as having arrived. None of our energy will go into what we need to be doing for the rest of our lives: engaging in ongoing self-awareness, continuing education, relationship building, and actual antiracist practice. White progressives do indeed uphold and perpetrate racism, but our defensiveness and certitude make it virtually impossible to explain to us how we do so.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

“I was co-leading a workshop with an African American man. A white participant said to him, "I don't see race; I don't see you as black." My co-trainer's response was, "Then how will you see racism?" He then explained to her that he was black, he was confident that she could see this, and that his race meant that he had a very different experience in life than she did. If she were ever going to understand or challenge racism, she would need to acknowledge this difference. Pretending that she did not noticed that he was black was not helpful to him in any way, as it denied his reality - indeed, it refused his reality - and kept hers insular and unchallenged. This pretense that she did not notice his race assumed that he was "just like her," and in so doing, she projected her reality onto him. For example, I feel welcome at work so you must too; I have never felt that my race mattered, so you must feel that yours doesn't either. But of course, we do see the race of other people, and race holds deep social meaning for us.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

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