Stephen Kotkin



Stephen Mark Kotkin is Professor of History and director of the Program in Russian Studies at Princeton University. He specializes in the history of the Soviet Union and has recently begun to research Eurasia more generally.

Average rating: 3.84 · 6,292 ratings · 495 reviews · 42 distinct worksSimilar authors
Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes...

3.78 avg rating — 3,504 ratings — published 2014 — 14 editions
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Stalin: Waiting for Hitler ...

4.47 avg rating — 661 ratings — published 2017 — 10 editions
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Armageddon Averted: The Sov...

3.73 avg rating — 713 ratings — published 2001 — 12 editions
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Magnetic Mountain: Stalinis...

4.10 avg rating — 264 ratings — published 1995 — 6 editions
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Uncivil Society: 1989 and t...

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3.84 avg rating — 178 ratings — published 2009 — 8 editions
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Steeltown, USSR: Soviet Soc...

3.52 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
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The Collapse of the Soviet ...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2002
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Mongolia in the Twentieth C...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Stalin: Waiting for Hitler ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Rediscovering Russia In Asi...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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More books by Stephen Kotkin…
Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes... Stalin: Waiting for Hitler ...
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“What we designate modernity was not something natural or automatic. It involved a set of difficult-to-attain attributes—mass production, mass culture, mass politics—that the greatest powers mastered. Those states, in turn, forced other countries to attain modernity as well, or suffer the consequences, including defeat in war and possible colonial conquest.”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

“Revolutions are like earthquakes: they are always being predicted, and sometimes they come.”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

“That such lowly beginnings would soon become one of the world’s strongest dictatorships is beyond fantastic. Lenin was essentially a pamphleteer. In 1918 he was identified as “Chairman of the Council of People’s Commissars and journalist,” and earned more money from publication honoraria (15,000 rubles) than from his salary (10,000 rubles).17 Trotsky was a writer as well, and a grandiloquent orator, but similarly without experience or training in statecraft. Sverdlov was something of an amateur forger, thanks to his father’s engraving craft, and a crack political organizer but hardly an experienced policy maker. Stalin was also an organizer, a rabble-rouser, and, briefly, a bandit, but primarily a periodicals editor—commissar of nationalities was effectively his first regular employment since his brief stint as a teenage Tiflis weatherman. Now,”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

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