Stephen Kotkin



Stephen Mark Kotkin is Professor of History and director of the Program in Russian Studies at Princeton University. He specializes in the history of the Soviet Union and has recently begun to research Eurasia more generally.

Average rating: 4.02 · 3,481 ratings · 405 reviews · 36 distinct worksSimilar authors
Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes...

4.27 avg rating — 1,237 ratings — published 2014 — 13 editions
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Armageddon Averted: The Sov...

3.72 avg rating — 576 ratings — published 2001 — 11 editions
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Stalin: Waiting for Hitler ...

4.48 avg rating — 433 ratings — published 2017 — 3 editions
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Magnetic Mountain: Stalinis...

4.10 avg rating — 219 ratings — published 1995 — 6 editions
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Uncivil Society: 1989 and t...

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3.80 avg rating — 160 ratings — published 2009 — 8 editions
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Steeltown, USSR: Soviet Soc...

3.67 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
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The Collapse of the Soviet ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2002
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Mongolia in the Twentieth C...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Rediscovering Russia In Asi...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1995 — 5 editions
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Steeltown, USSR: Glasnost, ...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1989
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More books by Stephen Kotkin…
Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes... Stalin: Waiting for Hitler ...
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4.33 avg rating — 1,670 ratings


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“What we designate modernity was not something natural or automatic. It involved a set of difficult-to-attain attributes—mass production, mass culture, mass politics—that the greatest powers mastered. Those states, in turn, forced other countries to attain modernity as well, or suffer the consequences, including defeat in war and possible colonial conquest.”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

“Revolutions are like earthquakes: they are always being predicted, and sometimes they come.”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

“Russia was a genuine great power, but with a tragic flaw. Its vicious, archaic autocracy had to be emasculated for any type of better system to emerge. Unmodern in principle, let alone in practice, the autocracy died a deserving death in the maelstrom of the Anglo-German antagonism, the bedlam of Serbian nationalism, the hemophilia bequeathed by Queen Victoria, the pathology of the Romanov court, the mismanagement by the Russian government of its wartime food supply, the determination of women and men marching for bread and justice, the mutiny of the capital garrison, and the defection of the Russian high command.

But the Great War did not break a functioning autocratic system; the war smashed an already broken system wide open.”
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

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