Rob Fitzpatrick

Goodreads Author


Born
in The United States
June 08, 1984

Website

Twitter

Member Since
August 2019


Rob is an entrepreneur of 12 years. He went through YCombinator (s07) with an attempt to figure out social advertising before Facebook managed to do so, which obviously didn’t work out so well. He has raised funding in the US and UK, built products used by customers like Sony and MTV, designed and Kickstarted a card game, cofounded the education agency Founder Centric, rebuilt a little sailboat, and has built and launched countless silly hobby and side projects which have (so far) managed to keep the wolf from the door. He’s a techie who (grudgingly) learned enterprise sales. He now specializes in the gathering of unbiased customer learning and taking an idea from nothing through to its first dozen or so paying customers.

Rob is the author o
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Average rating: 4.37 · 8,274 ratings · 869 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Mom Test: How to talk t...

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Calendar time vs clock time (AKA why “should I quit my job?” is a bad question)

You’re talented, driven, and trying to decide whether or not to quit your job to start a business. This seems like a good and important question with which to wrestle. But it’s not, because it’s phrased in a way which contains a massive and misleading assumption.


Going full-time on your startup does two things:



It gives you 8ish productive hours per day to invest in your new business
It begins burnin Read more of this blog post »
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Published on August 21, 2018 01:38
Quotes by Rob Fitzpatrick  (?)
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“Trying to learn from customer conversations is like excavating a delicate archaeological site. The truth is down there somewhere, but it’s fragile. While each blow with your shovel gets you closer to the truth, you’re liable to smash it into a million little pieces if you use too blunt an instrument.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“It boils down to this: you aren’t allowed to tell them what their problem is, and in return, they aren’t allowed to tell you what to build. They own the problem, you own the solution.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“Rule of thumb: You should be terrified of at least one of the questions you’re asking in every conversation.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“Trying to learn from customer conversations is like excavating a delicate archaeological site. The truth is down there somewhere, but it’s fragile. While each blow with your shovel gets you closer to the truth, you’re liable to smash it into a million little pieces if you use too blunt an instrument.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“It boils down to this: you aren’t allowed to tell them what their problem is, and in return, they aren’t allowed to tell you what to build. They own the problem, you own the solution.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“Long story short, that person is a complainer, not a customer.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“Some problems don’t actually matter.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

“The world’s most deadly fluff is: “I would definitely buy that.” It just sounds so concrete. As a founder, you desperately want to believe it’s money in the bank. But folks are wildly optimistic about what they would do in the future. They’re always more positive, excited, and willing to pay in the imagined future than they are once it arrives.”
Rob Fitzpatrick, The Mom Test: How to talk to customers & learn if your business is a good idea when everyone is lying to you

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