Manny Rayner


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Manny Rayner

Goodreads Author


Member Since
November 2008

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Many people have been protesting against what they describe as censorship on Goodreads. I disagree. In fact, I would like to say that I welcome the efforts that Goodreads management is making to improve the deplorably low quality of reviewing on this site.

Please, though, just give me clearer guidelines. I want to know how to use my writing to optimize Amazon sales, especially those of sensitive self-published authors. This is a matter of vital importance to me, and outweighs any possible considerations of making my reviews interesting, truthful, creative or entertaining.

Thank you.


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Popular Answered Questions

Manny Rayner The relentless high-level buzz this feature creates has already sold me at least two extra copies. I'm not making it up, I can show you the figures.

Manny Rayner Well, since you ask: I learned one morning that Goodreads had just been acquired by Amazon, after having promised its members that it would stay…moreWell, since you ask: I learned one morning that Goodreads had just been acquired by Amazon, after having promised its members that it would stay independent and persuading thousands of librarians to put in dozens of unpaid hours of work each to upload catalog information which was now completely irrelevant. I felt kind of pissed off, and decided to collect together 80 or so of my reviews in a book and then take them offline. The result was If Research Were Romance.

That was very cathartic! I must say, I rather like this "Ask the Author" feature. I don't know why I haven't used it earlier.(less)
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Racist jokes (Select)
16 chapters   —   updated Aug 04, 2018 02:41PM
Description: Luckily I'm very multi-ethnic, so I consider I have the right to insult a lot of nationalities. Feel free to insult me back. Most things will work. In more detail, if you're curious: I was born in England, I grew up in Wales, my father was Polish/Russian/Jewish, my mother is Italian, my girlfriend is Australian, my ex-wife is Swedish, I lived for several years in California, I currently work in Switzerland, I often read books in French, Norwegian and German, and I spend a lot of time hanging out with Belgian, Columbian, Russian and Japanese people. I probably missed a couple of countries.
Mixed Metaphor Corner (Horror)
5 chapters   —   updated Aug 01, 2018 02:14AM
Description: <img src="https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/photo.goodreads.com/hostedimages/1437326216r/15571152._SX540_.jpg" width="400" height="300"/> I don't know why I didn't start this years ago, but better late than never.
Geek jokes (Humor)
12 chapters   —   updated Jun 17, 2017 12:53PM
Description: Enter at own risk.
The Three Holes (Poetry)
3 chapters   —   updated Mar 21, 2017 02:52PM
Description: My sequel to Perec. I show how I love OULIPO.
Short pieces (Humor)
8 chapters   —   updated Sep 15, 2016 09:17AM
Description: Random ideas that occur to me from time to time
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Unhinged by Omarosa Manigault Newman
" Carey, I'm sorry that Recycled is not yet available on Amazon. Even though there is a conspiracy to silence me, sooner or later the truth will out. Bu ...more "
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Don't waste your money on this book. My own sensational tell-all memoir, Recycled: An Outsider's Account of Life with Trump, will offer twice as much dirt for half as many dollars! Here are just a few of the exclusive revelatory revelations I will ex ...more
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Ævintýri Lísu í Undralandi
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[From Litli prinsinn]

[Original review, Aug 12 2018]

My attempt to learn Icelandic just by reading continues with the Icelandic translation of Alice in Wonderland, another of my favourite books. I've now finished my first pass and am going back to the
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Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
" It kind of says something about Ayn Rand that she couldn't get by with just one Mary Sue. Maybe she liked Dagny too much to give her the unreadable si ...more "
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Litli prinsinn by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
" I am sure it would work very well for you! "
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"Interesting to see this book is top of the New York Times bestseller list this week although it still has very few ratings on goodreads.

Also interesting that randomly clicking on about ten of the five star reviews on the first goodreads page broug..." Read more of this review »
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Politics based on practical objectives rather than on ideals…a pragmatic, no-nonsense view and a disregard for ethical considerations. In diplomacy it is often associated with relentless, though realistic, pursuit of the national intere..." Read more of this review »
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“There's nothing wrong with giving up all your principles for a suitable financial reward. It is indeed the basis of our society.”
Manny Rayner

“Many people have been protesting against what they describe as censorship on Goodreads. I disgree. In fact, I would like to say that I welcome the efforts that Goodreads management is making to improve the deplorably low quality of reviewing on this site.

Please, though, just give me clearer guidelines. I want to know how to use my writing to optimize Amazon sales, especially those of sensitive self-published authors. This is a matter of vital importance to me, and outweighs any possible considerations of making my reviews interesting, truthful, creative or entertaining.”
Manny Rayner

“Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
E'en in Australia art thou still more hot
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May
(Since that's your winter it don't mean a lot)
Sometimes too bright the eye of heaven shines
And bushfires start through half of New South Wales
Just so, when I do see thy bosom's lines
A fire consumes me and my breathing fails

But thine eternal summer shall not fade
This is in no way due to global warming;
Nay, from thy breasts shall verses fair be made
So damn compulsive they are habit-forming
So long as men can read and eyes can see
So long lives this, thou 34DD

(Based on an idea by William Shakespeare. I'm sure he'd agree that I've improved it)”
Manny Rayner

“As the semantic engineer, your job is naming the parts and tightening nuts and bolts. I suggest you get back to your office and do that - right now!”
John Sladek, The Steam-Driven Boy

“La parole humaine est comme un chaudron fêlé où nous battons des mélodies à faire danser les ours, quand on voudrait attendrir les étoiles.”
Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary

“I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.”
Anonymous, Holy Bible: King James Version

“Longed for him. Got him. Shit.”
Margaret Atwood

“The summer's flower is to the summer sweet
Though to itself it only live and die”
William Shakespeare, The Complete Sonnets and Poems

1 Goodreads Feedback — 26004 members — last activity 7 minutes ago
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75460 The Year of Reading Proust — 1569 members — last activity Jul 30, 2018 11:58AM
2013 was the year for reading—or re-reading—Marcel Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu or In Search of Lost Time for many of us. However, these thr ...more
170208 2016: A Dance to the Music of Time — 105 members — last activity Apr 05, 2017 12:26PM
2016 reading group for the 12 book series by Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time. One book per month.
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A place for people who hate my Harry Potter review to hang out and badmouth it. http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/106779667
118373 Off-Topic Discussion — 26 members — last activity Nov 13, 2013 11:25AM
Seems the book has sparked some discussion and interest! To better organize questions and future developments of interested parties, here is a group!
76877 Miévillians — 241 members — last activity Jul 01, 2018 08:08AM
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176380 "Against the Day", Thomas Pynchon - 2015 / 2016 — 85 members — last activity Apr 27, 2016 03:30PM
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Comments (showing 280-329)    post a comment »

message 329: by Manny

Manny It's enough like Norwegian that I can often guess phrases, but I've never got further than that. But after reading Tolkien: Maker of Middle-Earth the other day, I felt inspired :)


message 328: by Glenn

Glenn Russell Good luck with reading more of Icelandic. I suspect Icelandic doesn't have a lot in common with those other language, probably because Iceland was not exactly at the crossroads of the Silk Road. I have a hard time imagining a caravan of camels walking across Iceland.


message 327: by Manny

Manny Thank you Glenn! Unfortunately, I do not speak even one of those languages. Though I did ask a friend earlier today to pick me up a couple of Icelandic books while she was in Reykjavik, I've been meaning to get up to speed on Icelandic for the longest time...


message 326: by Glenn

Glenn Russell Brankovich Avram of the 17th century was among the authors of the book who could not speak one language for more than a minute at a time. While in conversation, Brankovich switched back and forth from Hungarian to Turkish to Walachian to Khazar and spoke Spanish in his sleep. --------- From my review of Dictionary of the Khazars. I thought of you when I read this. Perhaps you are one of the few people who could actually follows this guy's conversation.


message 325: by Glenn

Glenn Russell Manny wrote: "Glenn wrote: "Hey Manny,

I recall in one of Plato's works he notes how a young boy who is basically good will be naive and confused when dealing with the evil or bad intentions in others since the..."


Thanks, Manny! I posted my review with just a general reference to Plato's statement.


message 324: by Manny

Manny Glenn wrote: "Hey Manny,

I recall in one of Plato's works he notes how a young boy who is basically good will be naive and confused when dealing with the evil or bad intentions in others since the young boy wil..."


Hi Glenn! I can't identify the Platonic source either. Though oddly enough, there was a very similar passage in the book Germany - What Next? (1939) - the author was explaining Hitler's favorite propaganda technique, the Big Lie. Topical stuff.


message 323: by Glenn (last edited Apr 23, 2018 01:04PM)

Glenn Russell Hey Manny,

I recall in one of Plato's works he notes how a young boy who is basically good will be naive and confused when dealing with the evil or bad intentions in others since the young boy will project his goodness onto others and doesn't understand how or why people can act in a way that is hurtful or harmful to others. Do you recall where this is found and in what dialogue? Thanks.

Glenn


message 322: by Aiden

Aiden Heavilin I think you'd like this video, Manny.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZGIN...


message 321: by Manny

Manny Kendall wrote: "Manny, I think I found an article that'll surprise you. :)

www.engadget.com/2017/09/06/george-or..."


Nice! But I would have been more surprised if I hadn't read How to Do Things With Videogames .


message 320: by Kendall

Kendall Moore Manny, I think I found an article that'll surprise you. :)

www.engadget.com/2017/09/06/george-or...


message 319: by Manny

Manny I'm willing to take him on. He's got more TV presence, but I know how to do evidence-based reasoning.


message 318: by Aiden (last edited Aug 25, 2017 09:58AM)

Aiden Heavilin Hey Manny, it's come to my attention that conservative political commentator Andrew Klavan is like the American/Republican version of you. He has your same sarcastic, good natured style of humor. I think it would be fun to see a debate between you two; you'd disagree on everything, but it would be entertaining.

Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXPKg... (satirical video he made about journalism)


message 317: by Manny

Manny Yago wrote: "What books would you recommend to someone who's starting to read in the french language?
So far, I've only read newspapers and Cet Amour-là (which I ain't enjoying right now)."


I'd recommend Le petit prince and the series Ainsi va la vie. Great stuff!


message 316: by Yago

Yago Ramalho What books would you recommend to someone who's starting to read in the french language?
So far, I've only read newspapers and Cet Amour-là (which I ain't enjoying right now).


message 315: by Manny

Manny Thank you for the invite, Vaclav!


message 314: by Vaclav

Vaclav Thank you for accepting my request Manny!


message 313: by Manny

Manny Xandraa and Ina, it's very nice of you to think of me, but I own neither a Kindle nor a smartphone.


message 312: by Manny

Manny "Deep inside"?!


message 311: by WarpDrive (last edited Feb 24, 2017 12:14PM)

WarpDrive Manny wrote: "Know how you feel. Trump can only be fictitious, no real person could ever be so implausibly one-dimensional? But I'm guessing the Author will show us another side of him in the next volume. I've b..."

This is unprecedented - http://money.cnn.com/2017/02/24/media...
why aren't people seriously concerned ? - why hasn't Trump been impeached yet ? Deep inside, Trump is a fascist - it is time the world took notice and do something about it.


message 310: by Aiden

Aiden Heavilin What I'm scared of is this author is trying to write the next big YA dystopia, and this right now is the backstory of the apocalypse.


message 309: by Manny

Manny Know how you feel. Trump can only be fictitious, no real person could ever be so implausibly one-dimensional? But I'm guessing the Author will show us another side of him in the next volume. I've been watching his output for a while, he's much cleverer than you first think.


message 308: by Aiden

Aiden Heavilin

Make sure you're an interesting character, then you won't get written out early."


Well, I've always strived to be interesting, but what if my author ENJOYS killing off the interesting people and keeping the boring ones alive? (BTW, it was Trump's inauguration that convinced me I'm in a story.)


message 307: by Manny

Manny Aiden wrote: "What advice would you give to someone who believes he is actually in a story?? (Like me)"

Make sure you're an interesting character, then you won't get written out early.


message 306: by Aiden

Aiden Heavilin What advice would you give to someone who believes he is actually in a story?? (Like me)


message 305: by Manny

Manny I'm very happy if anything I said I helped you create this unusual piece. Thank you Glenn!


message 304: by Glenn

Glenn Russell I just did re-post my review of Derrida's The Truth in Painting where I expressed my thanks to you in helping me understand the ideas in this French philosopher's book. Thanks again!


message 303: by Manny

Manny Ted wrote: "no coverage of the chess championship on your part? WIll Carlsen be able to win? Five draws and he has black for the next two games. What gives?"

Thank you Ted, I have been thinking I ought to write a few comments... it's been a terribly busy week! The match is indeed more interesting than some people were saying it would be...


message 302: by Ted

Ted no coverage of the chess championship on your part? WIll Carlsen be able to win? Five draws and he has black for the next two games. What gives?


message 301: by Glenn (last edited Sep 30, 2016 03:21AM)

Glenn Russell Hey, Manny. I don't remember the title of the book you reviewed where the discussion thread addressed the drawbacks of not reading an author in the original language. I recall mentioning I have zero talent in learning foreign languages.

Anyway, in case you are not familiar, Milan Kundera outlines how, when it comes to novels, the rule is the most perceptive readers are not from the novelist's home country and those readers are reading the author in translation. I wrote a reveiw of Kundera's book where I mentioned this. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 300: by Glenn

Glenn Russell Thanks again, Manny, for the clarification on that Cezanne quote appearing in Derrida's book. With your help I was able to finish my micronovel I wrote as a review of the Derrida book:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Thanks also to Simon for participating on this thread.


message 299: by Manny

Manny Simon wrote: "Manny wrote: "But it also seems possible for Cezanne to say that there is no reason, he has just decided that he owes him this debt. In which case it seems to be a performative.."

I don't think this follows. First, Cezanne may 'just decide' he owes a debt and be wrong about it. So there is no debt. And secondly, if deciding that there is a debt is sufficient for the existence of a debt, that suggests that the debt is created by the decision, not by the utterance of the expression "I owe you...". "


I agree that this is the crux of it. As you say, the statement "I owe you..." usually describes the existence of an obligation which has arisen for other reasons. But the Cezanne example is interesting precisely because (as Glenn originally pointed out) it at least suggests the possibility of a performative reading.

So first, is it plausible in this situation that Cezanne could have been mistaken? Can Bernard reply "Non, monsieur, you do not owe me anything"? There's no doubt that this would be staggeringly rude, but the question is whether it even makes sense. Maybe it does... but if it makes sense, does it actually have its literal meaning? It seems to have the value of decisively repudiating their friendship by rejecting the deep promise Cezanne has offered, and it feels (at least to me) that Bernard would just be playing with words, refusing to understand what Cezanne actually intended. I'm not convinced that Cezanne really can be mistaken.

Second, if it's the decision that creates the obligation rather than the utterance, would it have been possible for Cezanne to think to himself "I've decided that I owe Bernard the truth in painting, but I won't tell anyone"? It seems to me that he could quite reasonably have thought this. But even if he never does speak the words, the mere act of thinking them could be considered as a promise he makes to himself, in which case it is arguably a kind of performative.

So perhaps the real questions are a) whether it's possible for an obligation to arise merely by thinking to oneself "I have the following obligation", b) if this should be considered a performative. I don't know! It certainly is an interesting example.


message 298: by Glenn (last edited May 11, 2016 04:17PM)

Glenn Russell Thanks, gentlemen, for the provocative discussion.

And thanks, Manny, for getting back with me.
He now had to do it, or his honour as an artist would be impugned. And maybe he made the statement precisely for that reason, so as to force himself to deliver when otherwise he might have found it too difficult, ------ On the level of psychology, as you note, this type of promise is made by people all the time. From my own experience, in the arts all the time, for sure -- a statement an artist, writer, musician or performer makes publicly to prod themselves to get their creative juices flowing.


message 297: by Simon

Simon Manny wrote: "But it also seems possible for Cezanne to say that there is no reason, he has just decided that he owes him this debt. In which case it seems to be a performative.."

I don't think this follows. First, Cezanne may 'just decide' he owes a debt and be wrong about it. So there is no debt. And secondly, if deciding that there is a debt is sufficient for the existence of a debt, that suggests that the debt is created by the decision, not by the utterance of the expression "I owe you...".

It just doesn't seem part of the point or function of the language of obligation that saying that one has an obligation is itself creative of obligations. Promising is the way to create obligations performatively. But obligations themselves are created by all sorts of different things: promises, past favors, familial relations, legal standings, commands from those in authority, etc. The language of obligation extends to all these cases, and the natural function of "I owe... " or "I am obliged" is just to describe the existence of an obligation that derives from one of those sources. In fact, it would be very odd if "I owe... " or "I am obliged" were performative, since it would leave us with no simple way to express the existence of an obligation in general.


message 296: by Manny

Manny Wow, looking around I see that there is a mountain of literature already that discusses this sentence! From a page on Derridex (which is where we came in):
La phrase Je vous dois la vérité en peinture, et je vous la dirai a été écrite par Cézanne peu avant sa mort, dans une lettre à Emile Bernard datée du 23 octobre 1905. Il s'agissait d'un courrier privé, qui n'était évidemment pas destiné à une large diffusion. Et pourtant la phrase est devenue célèbre. Elle est constamment citée par les philosophes et les historiens de l'art.



message 295: by Manny

Manny Simon wrote: "Or consider this: Do you really think that if you go up to a stranger and say to them "Hey, I owe you $10" that you are now obliged to give them $10? You would be obliged if you said to them "Hey, I promise I'm going to give you $10"; but if you just say "Hey, I owe you $10"?"

My intuitions are a bit confused, since you expect in both cases that there would be a reason for saying it, and here there doesn't appear to be a reason - the person in question is behaving erratically. I wonder what the legal position is?

So the critical question is whether statements of the form "I owe you X" must always report on a state of affairs that has arisen for other reasons (clearly, they do at least some of the time), or whether they can create a state of indebtedness merely by being uttered, and hence be a kind of promise. If you choose the first alternative, then when someone felicitously says "I owe you X", there must always be a reason why they are indebted, so it always makes sense to say "Why?" I'm trying to think whether this is true!

It seems to me that this is exactly what makes the Cezanne example interesting: Cezanne says he owes Emile Bernard the truth in painting. Is it clear that Bernard can then ask why? If he can, then it's not a performative, and maybe this is reasonable; maybe Cezanne must explain and say that it's because Bernard has inspired him in some way, and he must return the favor. But it also seems possible for Cezanne to say that there is no reason, he has just decided that he owes him this debt. In which case it seems to be a performative... and will there not be other, similar cases?


message 294: by Simon

Simon Or consider this: Do you really think that if you go up to a stranger and say to them "Hey, I owe you $10" that you are now obliged to give them $10? You would be obliged if you said to them "Hey, I promise I'm going to give you $10"; but if you just say "Hey, I owe you $10"?


message 293: by Simon

Simon Manny wrote: "Simon wrote: "This seems much too quick to me. I don't think "I owe you X" is generally a performative at all. It *might* be used as a way of saying "I promise to give you X" but that is certainly ..."

If I promise to pay you $10, which does create an obligation for me to pay you, and you want to remove that obligation, you say something like "I release (or free) you from your promise." You don't say "No you don't promise me." Now suppose I promise to pay, creating an obligation, and you release me. I forget that you have released me and say "Oh I owe you $10." I'm acknowledging the existence of the obligation created by the promise. You say "no you don't." You're not releasing me from the obligation; you're reminding me that you have released me from the promise and that there is therefore no existing obligation.

Or consider the case where you spontaneously do me a big big favor and I say, "Wow, man, I really owe you!" Again, surely I am just recognizing an obligation to you that was created not by my utterance but by your doing me the big favor?

I just don't see how, except perhaps in unusual circumstances (where using the language is a way of making a promise), an utterance of the form "I owe you X" itself creates any obligation.


message 292: by Manny

Manny Simon wrote: "This seems much too quick to me. I don't think "I owe you X" is generally a performative at all. It *might* be used as a way of saying "I promise to give you X" but that is certainly not its main use. Just think of how natural it would be to say "I owe you $10" and for you to reply "No, you paid me already," or "No, you don't owe me anything. I was doing you a favor." The truth-conditions for "I owe you X" are that there is an already existing obligation for me to give you X."

I certainly won't deny that there are many cases where you can say "I owe you $10" and not incur an obligation. As you point out, if there already is an debt, you're just acknowledging it by saying that, not creating a new debt. But if there is no debt, and you say this, isn't it different? I say I need a bottle of wine, and you give it to me, and I say "I owe you $10" - don't my words create the debt, even though you might immediately cancel it by saying that you're happy to do me a favor? And it sounds like the Cezanne case is in this class.


message 291: by Simon

Simon Manny wrote: "Glenn wrote: "I hope you don't mind me asking you a question on Derrida's The Truth of Painting since you have a strong interest in language and analytic philosophy.

Anyhow, in this book Derrida ..."


This seems much too quick to me. I don't think "I owe you X" is generally a performative at all. It *might* be used as a way of saying "I promise to give you X" but that is certainly not its main use. Just think of how natural it would be to say "I owe you $10" and for you to reply "No, you paid me already," or "No, you don't owe me anything. I was doing you a favor." The truth-conditions for "I owe you X" are that there is an already existing obligation for me to give you X.


message 290: by Manny

Manny Glenn wrote: "I hope you don't mind me asking you a question on Derrida's The Truth of Painting since you have a strong interest in language and analytic philosophy.

Anyhow, in this book Derrida turns to an am..."


Wow, that's an interesting example. You've kind of made me want to read what Derrida had to say about it.

If you believe in the theory of performatives, and I think most people do these days, any seriously intended statement of the form "I owe you X" places you in a state of indebtedness and by virtue of that changes the nature of your relationships to the people affected, and hence your social reality. That's just what it means to say "I owe you X". So it seems to me that if Cezanne was serious (and perhaps this is the thing that's least clear), then he must have changed the social reality by saying "I owe you the truth in painting and will tell it to you". He now had to do it, or his honour as an artist would be impugned. And maybe he made the statement precisely for that reason, so as to force himself to deliver when otherwise he might have found it too difficult,

It is not in fact so unusual for people to make vows of this kind in order to strengthen their resolve, though normally the stakes are lower.


message 289: by Glenn (last edited May 11, 2016 09:26AM)

Glenn Russell I hope you don't mind me asking you a question on Derrida's The Truth of Painting since you have a strong interest in language and analytic philosophy.

Anyhow, in this book Derrida turns to an ambiguous statement, the one where Cezanne wrote his friend that he owed him the truth in painting and will tell it to him.

As I understand, this type of statement or speech act is referred to as a performance utterance, a statement that does something, like a minister telling a couple he will pronounce them husband and wife on Saturday. I also have read that a performative utterances are sentences that also change the social reality they are describing. So, my question: Is Cezanne changing the social reality with his statement "I owe you the truth in painting and will tell it to you?" In other words, is Cezanne's statement a performance statement in this sense? --- Thanks. Any help most appreciated

Glenn


message 288: by Manny

Manny David wrote: "Thank you, although I can't open the link.

Manny, what would you say are the main differences between chess and go? I have heard chess is more logical and go more intuitive... do you think calcul..."


People always say that - but having studied Go for a while, my impression is that Go players are in fact better than chess players at both intuition and calculation...


message 287: by David

David Thank you, although I can't open the link.

Manny, what would you say are the main differences between chess and go? I have heard chess is more logical and go more intuitive... do you think calculation is more important in chess than in go? That would make chess (a little bit) easier, I suppose...


message 286: by Manny

Manny David wrote: "Yes! There's an upcoming match. Now I have the curiosity and I would like to learn Go... I wish I would have more time... ;)"

Looking around, you can find the full paper here - among other things, it includes all the games from the match with Fan Hui.


message 285: by Manny

Manny I'm going to have to get out my Go books and brush up my skills in preparation...


message 284: by David

David Yes! There's an upcoming match. Now I have the curiosity and I would like to learn Go... I wish I would have more time... ;)


message 283: by Manny

Manny And it's playing the world #1 in March! Now that's going to be an interesting match... what a shame that Kawabata is no longer around to write The Master of Go 2...


message 282: by Manny

Manny David wrote: "Manny, as I know you are interested in the games of Go, chess and the world of AI, you may want to read this. Perhaps you already know it: a machine has beaten the European champion of Go, a profes..."

Hey, thank you! That's impressive... and no, I hadn't heard before. Those guys at Deep Mind are really good. The method makes intuitive sense, but actually making it do the job must have required so much cleverness and hard work.


message 281: by David

David Manny, as I know you are interested in the games of Go, chess and the world of AI, you may want to read this. Perhaps you already know it: a machine has beaten the European champion of Go, a professional player.

http://googleresearch.blogspot.com.es...


message 280: by Manny

Manny Very happy to be friends, Erin!


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