Pat Miller



Average rating: 4.05 · 3,082 ratings · 358 reviews · 70 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Power of Positive Dog T...

4.29 avg rating — 1,463 ratings — published 2001 — 16 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Hole Story of the Doughnut

by
3.77 avg rating — 444 ratings — published 2016 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Squirrel's New Year's Resol...

3.65 avg rating — 295 ratings — published 2010 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
We're Going on a Book Hunt

3.56 avg rating — 220 ratings — published 2008 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Do Over Dogs: Give Your Dog...

4.12 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Substitute Groundhog

3.80 avg rating — 151 ratings — published 2006 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Play with Your Dog

4.02 avg rating — 100 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Positive Perspectives 2: Kn...

4.46 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
How to Foster Dogs: From Ho...

4.31 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Beware Of The Dog - Positiv...

4.38 avg rating — 21 ratings2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Pat Miller…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“The best way to take control over a people and control them utterly is to take a little of their freedom at a time, to erode rights by a thousand tiny and almost imperceptible reductions. In this way, the people will not see those rights and freedoms being removed until past the point at which these changes cannot be reversed.”
Pat Miller, Willfully Ignorant

“I would rather have cookies in my jacket pockets than a chain around my dog's neck.”
Pat Miller, The Power of Positive Dog Training

“Even the submissive grin is misunderstood. Sadly, it can be mistaken for a snarl, and a dog may be labeled as aggressive who is actually anything but. It’s also often perceived as a doggy version of a happy smile—a less damaging interpretation, but still a misperception of a clearly subordinate display. Interestingly, the submissive grin is believed to be an imitation of the human smile, since dogs don’t normally display this behavior to each other, only to humans. While some behaviorists consider the grin to be an attention-seeking appeasement gesture, others consider it more of a threat-averting deference signal. In any case, it’s important to understand that the dog who grins is making a status statement—your rank is higher than hers—exhibiting neither an aggressive threat nor a relaxed, contented smile.”
Pat Miller, The Power of Positive Dog Training



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Pat to Goodreads.