Goodbye, Things Quotes

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Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki
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Goodbye, Things Quotes (showing 1-30 of 109)
“Want to know how to make yourself instantly unhappy? Compare yourself with someone else.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Why do we own so many things when we don’t need them? What is their purpose? I think the answer is quite clear: We’re desperate to convey our own worth, our own value to others. We use objects to tell people just how valuable we are.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“When given too many choices, people tend to worry that there’s something better out there than what they decided on.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“If it’s not a “hell, yes!” it’s a “no.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Happiness is not having what you want, but wanting what you have. —RABBI HYMAN SCHACHTEL”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Minimalism is just the beginning. It’s a tool. Once you’ve gone ahead and minimized, it’s time to find out what those important things are. Minimalism”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“It’s often said that cleaning your house is like polishing yourself. I think that this is a golden rule. It isn’t just dust and dirt that accumulate in our homes. It’s also the shadows of our past selves that let that dust and dirt continue to build. Cleaning the grime is certainly unpleasant, but more than that, it’s the need to face our own past deeds that makes it so tough. But when we have fewer material possessions and cleaning becomes an easy habit, the shadows we now face will be of our daily accomplishments.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“We are more interested in making others believe we are happy than in trying to be happy ourselves. —FRANÇOIS DE LA ROCHEFOUCAULD”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Minimalism is not a rite of penance, nor is it a competitive sport. It is simply a means to an end.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Minimalism is built around the idea that there’s nothing that you’re lacking.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“You can avoid buying more things simply by first asking yourself if it’s something that you actually need.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“The glory of acquisition starts to dim with use, eventually changing to boredom as the item no longer elicits even a bit of excitement. This is the pattern of everything in our lives. No matter how much we wish for something, over time it becomes a normal part of our lives, and then a tired old item that bores us, even though we did actually get our wish. And we end up being unhappy.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“When you’re aware of all the things that you own, you’re not only certain of where they are, you’re also sure about whether you have them or not.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“There’s another benefit to a minimalist wardrobe. Because we choose items that are timeless, we don’t need to worry about being out of style.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Happiness is not having what you want, but wanting what you have. —”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“The things you own end up owning you.” A”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“the accumulation of small achievements is the only way to do something incredible.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“We can accumulate as much as we like, but without gratitude we’ll only end up being bored with everything we’ve obtained. Conversely, we can achieve true contentment with few possessions, just so long as we treat them with gratitude. The”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“The qualities I look for in the things I buy are (1) the item has a minimalist type of shape, and is easy to clean; (2) its color isn’t too loud; (3) I’ll be able to use it for a long time; (4) it has a simple structure; (5) it’s lightweight and compact; and (6) it has multiple uses.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“I’ve heard it said that the secret to a happy marriage is to simply talk a lot with your partner. One study showed that happily married couples talked with each other five more hours per week than couples that aren’t happy. If people are busy taking care of their possessions, quarreling over them, spending time in separate rooms, or watching a lot of TV, they’re naturally going to have less time for conversations.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“There’s a favorite quote of mine from Dale Carnegie’s How to Stop Worrying and Start Living that really sums up what was wrong with me: “I was trying to wash today’s dishes, yesterday’s dishes and dishes that weren’t even dirty yet.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Minimalism had to be born, not out of a mere spur-of-the-moment idea or yearning for a new lifestyle, but from an earnest desire and fervent need to rethink our lives.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Happiness isn’t a state that we win by accomplishing certain criteria. Happiness is something that can only be felt in this moment. You”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“If you can’t make up your mind about an item, I suggest you go right ahead and discard it.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“If you really want to change something, the only way to do it is to start changing this very moment. There’s really no tomorrow, and no next week to look forward to. Once tomorrow comes, it’s going to be today. A year from now will be today when the time comes. Everything is in the now. By”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“In the film Into the Wild, the protagonist Chris McCandless leaves us with words I think are worth living by: “Happiness [is] only real when shared.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“My life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel. It was a drama of many scenes and without an end. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“My feeling is that minimalists are people who know what's truly necessary for them versus what they may want for the sake of appearance, and they're not afraid to cut down on everything in the second category.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
“Getting rich doesn't mean you will receive a special bonus and your days will become 25 hours long instead of 24.”
Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

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