Phaedo Quotes

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Phaedo Phaedo by Plato
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Phaedo Quotes Showing 1-30 of 63
“Only a philosopher's mind grows wings, since its memory always keeps it as close as possible to those realities by being close to which the gods are divine.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“Man is a prisoner who has no right to open the door of his prison and run away... A man should wait, and not take his own life until God summons him.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“There is also a third kind of madness, which is possession by the Muses, enters into a delicate and virgin soul, and there inspiring frenzy, awakens lyric....But he, who, not being inspired and having no touch of madness in his soul, comes to the door and thinks he will get into the temple by the help of art--he, I say, and his poetry are not admitted; the sane man is nowhere at all when he enters into rivalry with the madman.”
Plato, Phaedo
“if you are willing to reflect on the courage and moderation of other people, you will find them strange...they all consider death a great evil...and the brave among them face death, when they do, for fear of greater evils...therefore, it is fear and terror that make all men brave, except for philosophers. yet it is illogical to be brave through fear and cowardice...what of the moderate among them? is their experience not similar?...they master certain pleasures because they are mastered by others...i fear this is not the right exchange to attain virtue, to exchange pleasures for pleasures, pains for pains, and fears for fears, the greater for the less like coins, but that they only valid currency for which all these things should be exchanged is wisdom.”
Plato, Phaedo
“It is our duty to select the best and most dependable theory that human intelligence can supply, and use it as a raft to ride the seas of life.”
Plato, Phaedo
“For as there are misanthropists, or haters of men, there are also misologists, or haters of ideas, and both spring from the same cause, which is ignorance of the world.”
Plato, Phaedo
“Other people are likely not to be aware that those who pursue philosophy aright study nothing but dying and being dead. Now if this is true, it would be absurd to be eager for nothing but this all their lives, and then to be troubled when that came for which they had all along been eagerly practicing.”
Plato, Phaedo
“If anyone comes to the gates of poetry and expects to become an adequate poet by acquiring expert knowledge of the subject without the Muses' madness, he will fail, and his self-controlled verses will be eclipsed by the poetry of men who have been driven out of their minds.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“[there are] two kinds of things the nature of which it would be quite wonderful to grasp by means of a systematic art...

the first consists in seeing together things that are scattered about everywhere and collecting them into one kind, so that by defining each thing we can make clear the subject of any instruction we wish to give...

[the second], in turn, is to be able to cut up each kind according to its species along its natural joints, and to try not to splinter any part, as a bad butcher might do...

phaedrus, i myself am a lover of these divisions and collections, so that i may be able to think and to speak.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“[T]hose who practice philosophy in the right way are in training for dying and they fear death least of all men.”
Plato, Phaedo
“The wise man will want to be ever with him who is better than himself.”
Plato, Phaedo
“Wars and revolutions and battles, you see, are due simply and solely to the body and its desires. All wars are undertaken for the acquisition of wealth; and the reason why we have to acquire wealth is the body, because we are slaves in its service.”
Plato, Phaedo
“....I am inclined to think that these muscles and bones of mine would have gone off long ago to Megara or Boeotia—by the dog they would, if they had been moved only by their own idea of what was best.

(tr Jowett)”
Plato, Phaedo
“But of the heaven which is above the heavens, what earthly poet ever did or ever will sing worthily?”
Plato, Phaedrus
“["F]or it's not possible," [Socrates] said, "for anybody to experience a greater evil than hating arguments. Hatred of arguments and hatred of human beings come about in the same way. For hatred of human beings arises from artlessly trusting somebody to excess, and believing that human being to be in every way true and sound and trustworthy, and then a little later discovering that this person is wicked and untrustworthy - and then having this experience again with another. And whenever somebody experiences this many times, and especially at the hands of just those he might regard as his most intimate friends and comrades, he then ends up taking offense all the time and hates all human beings and believes there's nothing at all sound in anybody.”
Plato, Phaedo
“Are not they temperate from a kind of intemperance?”
Plato, Phaedo
“You know, Phaedrus, writing shares a strange feature with painting. The offsprings of painting stand there as if they are alive, but if anyone asks them anything, they remain most solemnly silent. The same is true of written words. You'd think they were speaking as if they had some understanding, but if you question anything that has been said because you want to learn more, it continues to signify just that very same thing forever. When it has once been written down, every discourse rolls about everywhere, reaching indiscriminately those with understanding no less than those who have no business with it, and it doesn't know to whom it should speak and to whom it should not. And when it is faulted and attacked unfairly, it always needs its father's support; alone, it can neither defend itself nor come to its own support. [275d-e]”
Plato, Phaedrus
“... there is no necessity for the man who means to be an orator to understand what is really just but only what would appear so to the majority of those who will give judgment; and not what is really good or beautiful but whatever will appear so; because persuasion comes from that and not from the truth.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“And yet even in reaching for the beautiful there is beauty, and also in suffering whatever it is that one suffers en route.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“All soul is immortal. For that which is always in movement is immortal; that which moves something else, and is moved by something else, in ceasing from movement ceases from living. So only that which moves itself, because it does not abandon itself, never stops moving. But it is also source and first principle of movement for the other things which move. Now a first principle is something which does not come into being. For all that comes into being must come into being from a first principle, but a first principle itself cannot come into being from anything at all; for if a first principle came into being from anything, it would not do so from a first principle. Since it is something that does not come into being, it must also be something which does not perish. For if a first principle is destroyed, neither will it ever come into being from anything itself nor will anything else come into being from it, given that all things must come into being from a first principle. It is in this way, then, that that which moves itself is a first principle of movement. It is not possible for this either to be destroyed or to come into being, or else the whole universe and the whole of that which comes to be might collapse together and come to a halt, and never again have a source from which things will be moved and come to be. And since that which is moved by itself has been shown to be immortal, it will incur no shame to say that this is the essence and the definition of the soul”
plato, Phaedrus
“the matter is as it is in all other cases: if it is naturally in you to be a good orator, a notable orator you will be when you have acquired knowledge and practice ...”
Plato, Phaedrus
“Even the best of writings are but a reminiscence of what we know...”
Plato, Phaedrus
“... as a breath of wind or some echo rebounds from smooth, hard surfaces and returns to the source from which it issued, so the stream of beauty passes back into its possessor through his eyes, which is its natural route to the soul; arriving there and setting him all aflutter, it waters the passages of the feathers and causes the wings to grow, and fills the soul of the loved one in his turn with love.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt?”
Plato, Phaedo
“Now I am a diviner, though not a very good one, but I have enough religion for my own use, as you might say of a bad writer—his writing is good enough for him; and”
Plato, Phaedrus
“Les amants, en effet, regrettent le bien qu’ils
ont fait, une fois que leur désir est éteint. Ceux qui n’ont pas d’amour, au contraire, n’ont
jamais occasion seyante au repentir, car ce n’est point par contrainte, mais librement, comme
s’ils s’occupaient excellemment des biens de leurs demeures, qu’ils font, dans la mesure de
leurs moyens, du bien à leurs amis. Les amants considèrent en outre, et les dommages que
leur amour fit à leurs intérêts et les largesses qu’ils ont dû consentir ; puis, en y ajoutant la
peine qu’ils ont eue, ils pensent depuis longtemps avoir déjà payé à leurs aimés le juste prix
des faveurs obtenues. Par contre, ceux qui ne sont pas épris ne peuvent, ni prétexter les
affaires négligées par amour, ni mettre en ligne de compte les souffrances passées, ni alléguer
les différends familiaux qu’ils ont eus. Exempts de tous ces maux, il ne leur reste plus qu’à
s’empresser de mettre en acte tout ce qu’ils croient devoir leur donner du plaisir.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“Oratory is the art of enchanting the soul, and therefore he who would be an orator has to learn the differences of human souls--they are so many and of such a nature, and from them come the differences between man and man.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“The word friend is common, the fact is rare.”
Plato, Phaedrus
“If it is pure when it leaves the body and drags nothing bodily with it, as it had no willing association with the body in life, but avoided it and gathered itself together by itself and always practiced this, which is no other than practicing philosophy in the right way, in fact, training to die easily. Or is this not training for death?”
Plato, Phaedo
“What you should do, said Socrates, is to say a magic spell over him every day until you have charmed his fears away.”
Plato, Phaedo

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