Greek Quotes

Quotes tagged as "greek" Showing 1-30 of 223
Rick Riordan
“Don't feel bad, I'm usually about to die.”
Rick Riordan, The Battle of the Labyrinth

Rick Riordan
“She glared at me like she was about to punch me, but then she did something that surprised me even more. She kissed me.
"Be careful seaweed brain." She said putting on her invisible cap and disappearing.
I probably would have sat there all day, trying to remember my name, but then the sea demons came.”
Rick Riordan

Aristotle
“Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well.”
Aristotle

Madeline Miller
“That is — your friend?"
"Philtatos," Achilles replied, sharply. Most beloved.”
Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

Horatius
“Pulvis et umbra sumus. (We are but dust and shadow.)”
Horace, The Odes of Horace

Chuck Palahniuk
“Experts in ancient Greek culture say that people back then didn't see their thoughts as belonging to them. When ancient Greeks had a thought, it occurred to them as a god or goddess giving an order. Apollo was telling them to be brave. Athena was telling them to fall in love.

Now people hear a commercial for sour cream potato chips and rush out to buy, but now they call this free will.
At least the ancient Greeks were being honest.”
Chuck Palahniuk, Lullaby

Euripides
“Come back. Even as a shadow, even as a dream.”
Euripides

Thomas Paine
“I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my own church.

All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian, or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.”
Thomas Paine, The Age of Reason

“When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.”
Herophilus

Rick Riordan
“It wasn’t easy looking dignified wearing a bed sheet and a purple cape.”
Rick Riordan, The Son of Neptune

Rick Riordan
“About five meters ahead, Nico was swinging his black sword with one hand, holding the scepter of Diocletian aloft with the other. He kept shouting orders at the legionnaires, but they paid him no attention.

Of course not, Frank thought. He's Greek.

[...]

Jason's face was already beaded with sweat. He kept shouting in Latin: "Form ranks!" But the dead legionnaires wouldn't listen to him, either.

[...]

"Make way!" Frank shouted. To his surprise, the dead legionnaires parted for him. The closest ones turned and stared at him with blank eyes, as if waiting for further orders.

"Oh, great..." Frank mumbled.”
Rick Riordan, The House of Hades

Stephen Fry
“Gaia visited her daughter Mnemosyne, who was busy being unpronounceable.”
Stephen Fry, Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

Homer
“And overpowered by memory
Both men gave way to grief. Priam wept freely
For man - killing Hector, throbbing, crouching
Before Achilles' feet as Achilles wept himself,
Now for his father, now for Patroclus once again
And their sobbing rose and fell throughout the house.”
Homer, The Iliad

Solon
“Call no man happy until he is dead.”
Solon

Constantinos P. Cavafy
“Επιθυμίες
Σαν σώματα ωραία νεκρών που δεν εγέρασαν
και τάκλεισαν, με δάκρυα, σε μαυσωλείο λαμπρό,
με ρόδα στο κεφάλι και στα πόδια γιασεμιά --
έτσ' η επιθυμίες μοιάζουν που επέρασαν
χωρίς να εκπληρωθούν· χωρίς ν' αξιωθεί καμιά
της ηδονής μια νύχτα, ή ένα πρωϊ της φεγγερό."

Desires
"Like beautiful bodies of the dead who had not grown old
and they shut them, with tears, in a brilliant mausoleum,
with roses at the head and jasmine at the feet --
this is what desires resemble that have passed
without fulfillment; without any of them having achieved
a night of sensual delight, or a morning of brightness.”
Constantine P. Cavafy, Before Time Could Change Them: The Complete Poems

Roman Payne
“Alexander the Great slept with 'The Iliad' beneath his pillow. During the waning moon, I cradle Homer’s 'Odyssey' as if it were the sweet body of a woman.”
Roman Payne, Rooftop Soliloquy

“I have often regretted my speech, never my silence.”
Simonides

Rick Riordan
“I see murky visions of other gods and rival magic."
That REALLY didn't sound good.
"What do you mean?" I asked. "what OTHER GODS?"
"I don't know, Sadie. But Egypt has always faced challenges from outside –– magicians from elsewhere, even gods from elsewhere. Just be vigilant."

~Ruby & Sadie Kane about...? Possibly Greeks?”
Rick Riordan, The Serpent's Shadow

W.E.B. Du Bois
“After the Egyptian and Indian, the Greek and Roman, the Teuton and Mongolian, the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world,—a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro... two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.

The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife, — this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self.”
W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk

Rick Riordan
“The wine god sighed. 'Oh Hades if I know. But remember, boy, that a kind act can sometimes be as powerful as a sword. As a mortal, I was never a great fighter or athlete or poet. I only made wine. The people in my village laughed at me. They said I would never amount to anything. Look at me now. Sometimes small things can become very large indeed.' He left me alone to think about that. And as I watched Clarisse and Chris singing a stupid campfire song together, holding hands in the darkness, where they thought nobody could see them, I had to smile.”
Rick Riordan, The Battle of the Labyrinth

Virgil
“But the queen--too long she has suffered the pain of love,
hour by hour nursing the wound with her lifeblood,
consumed by the fire buried in her heart. [...]
His looks, his words, they pierce her heart and cling--
no peace, no rest for her body, love will give her none.”
Virgil, The Aeneid

Rick Riordan
“He raised an eyebrow. "You claim not to know me? Of course I'm Thoth. Also called Djehuti. Also called--"
I [Sadie] stifled a laugh. "Ja-hooty?"
Thoth looked offended. "In Ancient Egyptian, it's a perfectly fine name. The Greeks called me Thoth. Then later they confused me with their god Hermes. Even had the nerve to rename my sacred city Hermopolis, though we're nothing alike. Believe me, if you've ever met Hermes--”
Rick Riordan, The Red Pyramid

Ovid
“In the make-up of human beings, intelligence counts for more than our hands, and that is our true strength.”
Ovid, Metamorphoses

Rick Riordan
“Hi, this is Ganymede, cup-bearer to Zeus, and when I'm out buying wine for the Lord of the Skies, I always buckle up!”
Rick Riordan, The Sea of Monsters

Rick Riordan
“In that moment, he chose Greek. He threw in his lot with Camp Half-Blood-and the horses changed. The storm clouds inside burned away, leaving nothing but red dust and shimmering heat, like mirages on the Sahara.”
Rick Riordan, The House of Hades

Τάσος Λειβαδίτης
“Κι μιὰ μέρα θέλω νὰ γράψουν στὸν τάφο μου: ἔζησε στὰ σύνορα
μιᾶς ἀκαθόριστης ἡλικίας καὶ πέθανε γιὰ πράγματα μακρινὰ ποὺ
……εἶδε κάποτε σ᾿ ἕνα ἀβέβαιο ὄνειρο.”
Τάσος Λειβαδίτης, Τα χειρόγραφα του φθινοπώρου

Rick Riordan
“I sort of fell."

"Percy! Six hundred and thirty feet?”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Alexander the Great
“Our enemies are Medes and Persians, men who for centuries have lived soft and luxurious lives; we of Macedon for generations past have been trained in the hard school of danger and war. Above all, we are free men, and they are slaves. There are Greek troops, to be sure, in Persian service — but how different is their cause from ours! They will be fighting for pay — and not much of at that; we, on the contrary, shall fight for Greece, and our hearts will be in it. As for our foreign troops — Thracians, Paeonians, Illyrians, Agrianes — they are the best and stoutest soldiers in Europe, and they will find as their opponents the slackest and softest of the tribes of Asia. And what, finally, of the two men in supreme command? You have Alexander, they — Darius!”
Alexander the Great

Constantinos P. Cavafy
“Άλλα ζητεί η ψυχή σου, γι’ άλλα κλαίει·”
C.P. Cavafy, C. P. Cavafy: Collected Poems

Sappho
“neither for me honey nor the honey bee”
Sappho, If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho

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