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Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez
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Invent To Learn Quotes Showing 1-30 of 62
“Students engaged in direct experience with materials, unforeseen obstacles, and serendipitous discoveries may result in understanding never anticipated by the teacher.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“The phrase, “technology and education” usually means inventing new gadgets to teach the same old stuff in a thinly disguised version of the same old way. Moreover, if the gadgets are computers, the same old teaching becomes incredibly more expensive and biased towards its dumbest parts, namely the kind of rote learning in which measurable results can be obtained by treating the children like pigeons in a Skinner box. (Papert, 1972a)”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“But the “jobs of the future” do not need scientists who have memorized the periodic table. In fact, business leaders say they are looking for creative, independent problem solvers in every field, not just math and science. Yet in most schools, STEM subjects are taught as a series of memorized procedures and vocabulary words, when they are taught at all. In 2009, only 3% of high school graduates had any credits in an engineering course. (National Science Board, 2012) Technology is increasingly being relegated to using computers for Internet research and test taking.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Like all learners, an educator is not a vessel to be filled, but a lamp to be lit.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Making, tinkering, and engineering are ways of knowing that should be visible in every classroom, regardless of the subject or age of the students. In a makerspace these processes may be defined loosely: Making is about the active role construction plays in learning. The maker has a product in mind when working with tools and materials. Tinkering is a mindset – a playful way to approach and solve problems through direct experience, experimentation, and discovery. Engineering extracts principles from direct experience. It builds a bridge between intuition and the formal aspects of science by being able to better explain, measure, and predict the world around us.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“tinkering is closer to the way real scientists, mathematicians, and engineers solve problems.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Research suggests that teachers who use more progressive or project-based learning techniques are more satisfied in their roles than teachers who use traditional instructional techniques.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“As teachers, we often promote the idea that process is more important than the end product, yet it is often the product itself that provides context and motivates students to learn.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Making is a stance that puts the learner at the center of the educational process and creates opportunities that students may never have encountered themselves. Makers are confident, competent, curious citizens in a new world of possibility.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“It is impossible to teach 21st century learners if you have not learned this century. — Gary Stager”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“When we allow children to experiment, take risks, and play with their own ideas, we give them permission to trust themselves. They”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Too often the term “project” means any activity that is not worksheet-based or that takes longer than a 42-minute class period.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“For those of us who want to change education, the hard work is in our own minds, bringing ourselves to enter intellectual domains we never thought existed. The deepest problem for us is not technology, nor teaching, nor school bureaucracies – it’s the limits of our own thinking.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Assessment is the work of teachers. It is judgment. We wish we could wave a magic wand and free teachers from all formal assessment responsibilities so they could use their time working with students. However, as long as teachers are required to assess, it should be as nonintrusive as possible and not distract students from the learning process.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Grading student work is likely to result in students being less willing to challenge themselves and to search for the easiest path to “done” rather than risk taking on another iteration of their projects.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“The best way to predict the future is to invent it. — Alan Kay”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“While school traditionally separates art and science, theory, and practice, such divisions are artificial. The real world just doesn’t work that way!”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“The best projects push up against the persistence of reality. What is a B+ poem or musical composition? How does an engineering project earn an 87? Most mindful work succeeds or fails. Students will want to do the best job possible when they care about their work and know that you put them ahead of a grade. If students are collaborating and regularly engaged in peer review or editing, then the judgment of an adult is really unnecessary. Worst of all, it is coercive and often punitive.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“New knowledge results from the process of making sense of new situations by reconciling new experiences or information with what the learner already knows or has experienced. This profoundly personal process underlies all learning. In this sense, the new buzzword of “personalized learning” is redundant. All learning is personal. Always.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Making is a way of bringing engineering to young learners. Such concrete experiences provide a meaningful context for understanding abstract science and math concepts. For older students, making combines disciplines in ways that enhance the learning process for diverse student populations and opens the doors to unforeseen career paths.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“One great new idea is Squishy Circuits – edible conductive and non-conductive dough that you mold just like regular modeling clay,”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Lewis Carroll wrote fairytales and was a mathematician. Even today, engineers have revolutionized the film and music industries. Schools would be well served by nurturing polymaths.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“children should engage in tinkering and making because they are powerful ways to learn.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. — Dr. Seuss”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Anytime an adult feels it necessary to intervene in an educational transaction, they should take a deep breath and ask, “Is there some way I can do less and grant more authority, responsibility, or agency to the learner?”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“A teacher who allows a child time and support to rethink and revise gives a child autonomy and the ability to trust themselves to be problem solvers, even if their path to success is different than everyone else’s.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“The former student wants to reminisce. She enthusiastically begins a sentence, “Remember that time we...” The rest of the sentence is never “crammed for the standardized test,” or “used all of our spelling words in a sentence.” The student’s reminiscence always concludes with a description of a project created in your classroom. Projects are what students remember long after the bell rings. Great teachers know that their highest calling is to make memories.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Electronics is central to our lives but disappeared from our consciousness.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“Leonardo da Vinci was a maker – perhaps the greatest maker of all time.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom
“As in today’s maker movement, connections between ideas, people, and disciplines are complex and abundant.”
Sylvia Libow Martinez, Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom

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