Woman at Point Zero Quotes

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Woman at Point Zero Woman at Point Zero by Nawal El-Saadawi
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Woman at Point Zero Quotes Showing 1-30 of 43
“Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“They said, “You are a savage and dangerous woman.”
I am speaking the truth. And the truth is savage and dangerous.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Yet not for a single moment did I have any doubts about my own integrity and honour as a woman. I knew that my profession had been invented by men, and that men were in control of both our worlds, the one on earth, and the one in heaven. That men force women to sell their bodies at a price, and that the lowest paid body is that of a wife. All women are prostitutes of one kind or another.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“All the men I did get to know, every single man of them, has filled me with but one desire: to lift my hand and bring it smashing down on his face.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“She is free to do what she wants, and free not to do it.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“I have triumphed over both life and death because I no longer desire to live, nor do I any longer fear to die.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Everybody has to die, Firdaus. I will die, and you will die. The important thing is how to live until you die.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Men impose deception on women and punish them for being deceived, force them down to the lowest level and punish them for falling so low, bind them in marriage and then chastise them with menial service for life, or insults, or blows.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“My skin is soft, but my heart is cruel, and my bite is deadly.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Love has made me a different person. It has made the world beautiful.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“I knew I hated him as only a woman can hate a man, as only a slave can hate his master.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Everybody has to die. I prefer to die for a crime I have committed rather than to die for one of the crimes which you have committed.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“But I feel that you, in particular, are a person who cannot live without love." "Yet I am living without love." "Then you are either living a lie or not living at all.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“I now knew that all of us were prostitutes who sold themselves at varying prices, and that an expensive prostitute was better than a cheap one.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Who said to kill does not require gentleness?”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“How many were the years of my life that went by before my body, and my self became really mine, to do with them as I wished? How many were the years of my life that were lost before I tore my body and my self away from the people who held me in their grasp since the very first day?”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Something I tried to hold onto, to touch if only for a moment, but it slipped away from me like the air, like an illusion, or a dream that floats away and is lost. I wept in my sleep as though it was something I was losing now; a loss I was experiencing for the first time, and not something I had lost a long time ago.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“You poor, deluded woman...do you believe there is any such thing as love?...You're living an illusion. Do you believe the words of love they whisper in the ears of penniless women like us?”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“Now i had learnt that honor required large sums of money to protect it, but that large sums of money could not be obtained without losing one's honor. An infernal circle whirling round and round, draggng me up and down with it.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“I discovered that all these rulers were men. What they had in common was an avaricious and distorted personality, a never-ending appetite for money, sex and unlimited power. They were men who sowed corruption on the earth, and plundered their peoples, men endowed with loud voices, a capacity for persuasion, for choosing sweet words and shooting poisoned arrows. Thus, the truth about them was revealed only after their death, and as a result I discovered that history tended to repeat itself with a foolish obstinacy.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“She replied that it was precisely men well versed in religion who beat their wives. The precepts of religion permitted such punishment. A virtuous woman was not supposed to complain about her husband. Her duty was perfect obedience. ”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“My work is not worthy of respect. Why then do you join in it with me?”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“How is it possible to live? Life is so hard?’
‘You must be harder than life, Firdaus. Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.’
‘But you are not hard, Sharifa, so how do you manage to live?’
‘I am hard, terribly hard, Firdaus.’
‘No, you are gentle and soft.’
‘My skin is soft, but my heart is cruel, and my bite deadly.’
‘Like snake?’
‘Yes, exactly like a snake. Life is a snake. They are the same, Firdaus. If the snake realises you are not a snake, it will bite you. And if life knows you have no sting, it will devour you.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“For truth and death are similar in that they both require a great courage if one wishes to face them. And truth is like death in that it kills. When I killed I did it with truth not with a knife. That is why they are afraid and in a hurry to execute me. They do not fear my knife. It is my truth that frightens them.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“My heart faltered, overcome by its frightened, almost frenzied beating because of something I had just lost, or was on the point of losing for ever. My fingers grasped at his hand with such violence that no force in the world, no matter how great, could take it away from me.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“أصبح عقلي واعياً بالحقيقة. حقيقة أنّني أفضّل أن أكون مومساً على أن أكون قدّيسةً مخدوعة. كلّ النّساء مخدوعات. الرّجال يفرضون عليك الخديعة ثمّ يعاقبونك لأنّك مخدوعة. والرّجال يفرضون عليك أن تهبطي إلى الحضيض، ثمّ يعاقبونك لأنّك هبطت إلى الحضيض. الرّجال يفرضون عليك الزّواج، ثمّ يعاقبونك بالضّرب والشّتيمة والخدمة المستمرّة. إلّا أنّ أقلّ النّساء انخداعاً هنّ المومسات، ومن أجل الزّواج أو الحبّ تنال المرأة عقاباً أشدّ.”
نوال السعداوي, Woman at Point Zero
“That men force women to sell their bodies at a price, and that the lowest paid body is that of a wife. All women are prostitutes of one kind or another. Because I was intelligent I preferred to be a free prostitute, rather than an enslaved wife.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“You poor, deluded woman...do you believe there is any such thing as love.”
Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“I came to realize that a female employee is more afraid of losing her job than a prostitute is of losing her life. An employee is scared of losing her job and becoming a prostitute because she does not understand that the prostitute’s life is in fact better than hers. And so she pays the price of her illusory fears with her life, her health, her body, and her mind. She pays the highest price for things of the lowest value. I now knew that all of us were prostitutes who sold themselves at varying prices, and that an expensive prostitute was better than a cheap one. I also knew that if I lost my job, all I would lose with it was the miserable salary, the contempt I could read every day in the eyes of the higher level executives when they looked at the lesser female officials, the humiliating pressure of male bodies on mine when I rode in the bus, and the long morning queue in front of a perpetually overflowing toilet.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero
“he explained to me that refusing a Head of State could be looked upon as an insult to a great man and lead to strained relations between the two countries. He added that if I really loved my country, if I was a patriot, I would go to him at once. So I told the man from the police that I knew nothing about patriotism, that my country had not only given me nothing, but had also taken away anything I might have had, including my honour and my dignity.”
Nawal El-Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero

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