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The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln A Narrative And Descrip... by Francis Fisher Browne
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Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff
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Poorly edited, given the rush to print, but a fascinating close up look at the Trump White House.
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I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us by John Gibler
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Sisters First by Jenna Bush Hager
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Humanizes the Bush family, especially George, father and son.
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Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff
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jane wants to read 40 books in the 2018 Reading Challenge
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She has read 3 books toward her goal of 40 books.
 
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Mississippi Blood by Greg Iles
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First Class by Alison    Stewart
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Born a Crime by Trevor Noah
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Autobiography of the South African born, multilingual comedian. Excellent.
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More of jane's books…
Marilyn Yalom
“Living in an age of casual sex, serial commitments, and frequent divorce, we are all in danger of becoming as jaded as anceien regime aristocrats. Does the notion of undying love still have any meaning for us today?”
Marilyn Yalom, How the French Invented Love: Nine Hundred Years of Passion and Romance

Eric Foner
“partial exception to this pattern was the Catholic Church, which generally did not require black worshippers to sit in separate pews (although its parochial schools were segregated). Some freedmen abandoned Catholicism for black-controlled Protestant denominations, but others were attracted to it precisely because, a Northern teacher reported from Natchez, “they are treated on terms of equality, at least while they are in church.” And Catholicism retained its hold on large numbers of New Orleans free blacks who, at least on Sunday, coexisted harmoniously with the city’s French and Irish white Catholic population.”
Eric Foner, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877

Eric Foner
“Like his idol Henry Clay, Lincoln saw government as an active force promoting opportunity and advancement. Its “legitimate object,” he wrote in an undated memorandum, “is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do…for themselves.” He offered as examples building roads and public schools and providing relief to the poor. To Lincoln, Whig policies offered the surest means of creating economic opportunities for upwardly striving men like himself.13”
Eric Foner, The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery

Eric Foner
“Lincoln, who enjoyed less than one year of formal schooling, was essentially self-educated. He read widely in nineteenth-century political economy, including the works of the British apostle of economic liberalism John Stuart Mill and the Americans Henry Carey and Francis Wayland. Although these writers differed on specific policies—Carey was among the most prominent advocates of a high tariff while Wayland favored free trade—all extolled the virtues of entrepreneurship and technological improvement in a modernizing market economy. (Wayland, the president of Brown University and a polymath who published works on ethics, religion, and philosophy, made no direct reference to slavery in his 400-page tome, Elements of Political Economy, but did insist that people did not work productively unless allowed to benefit from their own labor, an argument Lincoln would reiterate in the 1850s.)”
Eric Foner, The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery

Eric Foner
“By 1870, a large majority of blacks lived in two-parent family households, a fact that can be gleaned from the manuscript census returns but also “quite incidentally” from the Congressional Ku Klux Klan hearings, which recorded countless instances of victims assaulted in their homes, “the husband and wife in bed, and … their little children beside them.”
Eric Foner, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877

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