Jay

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Indistractable: H...
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12 Rules for Life...
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When the Past Is Present by David Richo
"A book must be an ice-axe to break the seas frozen inside our soul, Kafka said. For me, this book is one of those. Very easily in the top ten books I've ever read, brimming with insight and wisdom.

My only caveat would be that I'm not expert in ps..." Read more of this review »
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When the Past Is Present by David Richo
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Invested by Charles Schwab
"I love the company and loved the book. It was interesting, well-written, and motivational. It gave a lot of insight on the vision of the company and why they are what they are today."
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Becoming Better Grownups by Brad Montague
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All the Rage by Darcy Lockman
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Understanding Your Endowment by Cory B. Jensen
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Unstoppable Teams by Alden Mills
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Bridges by David B. Ostler
"The book was good at presenting the current faith crisis catalysts and best ways to address them. It was difficult to read about the surveys he conducted presented as statistically significant. Also grammar issues were distracting."
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Your Memory by Kenneth L. Higbee
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More of Jay's books…
Steve Blank
“In a startup no facts exist inside the building, only opinions.”
Steven Gary Blank, The Four Steps to the Epiphany: Successful Strategies for Startups That Win

Nassim Nicholas Taleb
“Some can be more intelligent than others in a structured environment—in fact school has a selection bias as it favors those quicker in such an environment, and like anything competitive, at the expense of performance outside it. Although I was not yet familiar with gyms, my idea of knowledge was as follows. People who build their strength using these modern expensive gym machines can lift extremely large weights, show great numbers and develop impressive-looking muscles, but fail to lift a stone; they get completely hammered in a street fight by someone trained in more disorderly settings. Their strength is extremely domain-specific and their domain doesn't exist outside of ludic—extremely organized—constructs. In fact their strength, as with over-specialized athletes, is the result of a deformity. I thought it was the same with people who were selected for trying to get high grades in a small number of subjects rather than follow their curiosity: try taking them slightly away from what they studied and watch their decomposition, loss of confidence, and denial. (Just like corporate executives are selected for their ability to put up with the boredom of meetings, many of these people were selected for their ability to concentrate on boring material.) I've debated many economists who claim to specialize in risk and probability: when one takes them slightly outside their narrow focus, but within the discipline of probability, they fall apart, with the disconsolate face of a gym rat in front of a gangster hit man.”
Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

Stephen McCranie
“The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.”
Stephen McCranie

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

C.S. Lewis
“No man knows how bad he is till he has tried very hard to be good. A silly idea is current that good people do not know what temptation means. This is an obvious lie. Only those who try to resist temptation know how strong it is. After all, you find out the strength of the German army by fighting against it, not by giving in. You find out the strength of a wind by trying to walk against it, not by lying down. A man who gives in to temptation after five minutes simply does not know what it would have been like an hour later. That is why bad people, in one sense, know very little about badness — they have lived a sheltered life by always giving in. We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it: and Christ, because He was the only man who never yielded to temptation, is also the only man who knows to the full what temptation means — the only complete realist.”
C.S. Lewis

20563 The UX Workshop Bookshelf — 274 members — last activity May 31, 2017 03:41AM
This is a collection of books related to user experience design and usability. Topics include interaction design, information architecture, graphic ...more