Comfort Reads discussion

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General > What are you reading right now? (SEE NEW THREAD)

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message 1: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Here's a place to share your current read even if it's not a comfort read. We love to talk about books of all kinds especially if they are good ones.
We won't shelve these books on the group bookshelves unless they turn out to be comfort reads for you. If you finish your current read and want to share it as a comfort read we would love it if you would post in the appropriate thread! Thanks.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm am reading a non-comforting book...Cutting for Stone for my book club meeting in March.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

I am just starting Northanger Abbey.


message 4: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Mostly reading Goodreads book club selections:

The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery: Volume I: 1889-1910 (on page 200, interesting, but not an easy read, as there is not only lots of information etc., the later entries are quite touching and emotionally draining)

The Neverending Story (reading this, or rather rereading this in German, wonderful, imaginative, but with an important message to find a balance between imagination and reality, on page 185)

For relaxation, I've been rereading the memoirs of James Herriot (they always both amuse me and ground me) and a new (at least to me) book of English language bloopers by Richard Lederer, The Bride of Anguished English: A Bonanza of Bloopers, Blunders, Botches, and Boo-Boos


message 5: by Lisa (not getting friends updates) (last edited Feb 23, 2010 01:25PM) (new)

Lisa  (not getting friends updates) Vegan (lisavegan) I'm reading a book for a March goodreads group: Woman on the Edge of Time (it's funny because it's about the future but was written in the 1970s so it feels dated), and I have 3 others I should be reading for March groups too but won't by March 1st: The Neverending Story, Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America, and Snow Crash, and 6 children's picture books which I will read by this weekend.

Thank goodness I've already read my real world book club March book.

Not so good is the huge pile of (non book club books) I'm eager to read.


message 6: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) I'm doing something I don't normally do - read 3 books at the same time. I know alot of you can do it, but it usually confuses me to juggle that many. I think I can do it this time because the books are fairly different in genre.

No More A-Roving (Sylvia Thorpe) - typical historical romance written in the 1970's by an author I read when I was a teen.

The Long-Shadowed Forest (Helen Hoover) - really interesting nature primer written by the author when she and her husband lived in the Minnesota wilderness in the 1950's-early 70's.

Thornyhold (Mary Stewart) - I first read it last year, and it immediately shot to my top 5 favorite comfort read list, so I'm rereading it. You can't go wrong with Dame Stewart.


message 7: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments I'm reading Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century by Robert Charles Wilson. I'm right into it, a fascinating story, and it definitely is *not a comfort read.

(Lisa, Snow Crash doesn't start till March 15 ;-))


message 8: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Peregrine wrote: "I'm reading Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century by Robert Charles Wilson. I'm right into it, a fascinating story, and it definitely is *not a comfor..."

Peregrine, that book looks interesting. It has quite a range of ratings among my friends who have read it. I'll be curious to see what you think when you finish.


Lisa  (not getting friends updates) Vegan (lisavegan) Peregrine wrote: "(Lisa, Snow Crash doesn't start till March 15 ;-)) "

Thanks. I do remember that now. I already have it in my pile at home. I'll try to read the others first. Too many books and I"m not sure when I'll read them.

(I have other group reads but they're books I've already read. Thank goodness.)


Lisa  (not getting friends updates) Vegan (lisavegan) Peregrine wrote: "I'm reading Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century by Robert Charles Wilson."

Ah, that's on my to-read shelf but it hadn't made it to my speculative-fiction shelf. That's been corrected. I'm also interested in hearing what you think when you're finished reading.


message 11: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments Lee and Lisa: 'kay then :-)


message 12: by Valerie (new)

Valerie I'm reading Self-Defense by Jonathan Kellerman. I'm currently reading all of his Alex Delaware books in order. This is #9 in the series, I believe.


message 13: by Darkpool (last edited Feb 24, 2010 12:10AM) (new)

Darkpool | 222 comments Listening to An Expert in Murder on the car CD player at the moment. I'm really enjoying it. It has a very authentic feel to it, and I'm loving the details of 1930's London life.


message 14: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments I just finished Await Your Reply: A Novel - great, great, great !! - and am now reading Let the Great World Spin which looks very promising.


message 15: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Yay! Good news, how many stars for Await Your Reply: A Novel?


message 16: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments Definitely 5 Lee! I'd give it more if I could!


message 17: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Mary, do you think it would be a good book for a book club read?


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Mary wrote: "I just finished Await Your Reply: A Novel - great, great, great !! - and am now reading Let the Great World Spin which looks very promising."

I read Await Your Reply last month, and it was good! I have another one of his on my shelf to read.


message 19: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Christine, how are you doing with Cutting for Stone?


message 20: by Chrissie (last edited Feb 24, 2010 09:31PM) (new)

Chrissie I just finished My Life and Hard Times by Thurber. It reads like short stories but is actually a quick autobiography of his boyhood in Columbus, Ohio. Marvelously funny. Now I am reading Un sac de billes which received high acclaim in France and is about two brothers escaping from Vichy controlled France in WW2. In my view it is YA and a bit "too cleaned up" for its primary audience. So fart it feels like the author wants to soften the tale. It is an autoibiography, but I believe kids can hear the truth. These are just my first impressions.


message 21: by Katri (new)

Katri (Valancy) | 68 comments I'm currently mostly focusing on doing research for some novel ideas I've got, and for them I'm mainly reading books about Finnish history and cultural history which are in Finnish only, so I don't suppose posting them will be that interesting... I'm having lots of fun reading about Finnish history in the 19th century, as well as the developments of early Finnish Gothic romantic literature in the 1840s!

Otherwise I'm reading books in foreign languages to help me with language learning: Inkheart (Tintenherz) by Cornelia Funke for German and The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier for French.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

How many languages can you read/speak? Five? Is there any Finnish Gothic romance translated to English? I confess I don't know any Finnish authors.


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Lee wrote: "Christine, how are you doing with Cutting for Stone?"

I love the story and the characters, but I'm having trouble with some of the medical detail. I try to skim over some yucky stuff, but I'm afraid I'll miss plot so I end up reading it all anyway. I want to know if one of my predictions is right...it's killing me.


message 24: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Christine, I had the exact same problem. Medical stuff scares me to pieces! Lee recommended I read Cutting for Stone, and I am really glad I did. The characters - well you grow to love them. Check out my review - I gave no spoiler! You will probably get what I am talking about...... I JUST finished it!


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

Chrissie,
I do love the characters, and the plot so far is really good. I just have to make a face when I am reading the surgery stuff...haha!


message 26: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Christine, ugh I can hardly read that stuff. I am have a huge fear of hospitals....... Things always go wrong there! Nice to know I am not alone.


message 27: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
I'm sorry you guys are bothered by the medical stuff. I guess I was more fascinated by the detail than grossed out. The only scene I remember feeling tense about was when the twins were born.


message 28: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments I've finished Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century and have written a review.


Lisa  (not getting friends updates) Vegan (lisavegan) Peregrine wrote: "I've finished Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century and have written a review."

Good review. This book is on my list. I'm not sure about it. I'd like to read it; it's just that my to-read list is out of control.


message 30: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Lee, I am really glad I read Cutting for Stone!


message 31: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments Lisa wrote: Good review.

Thanks, Lisa :-)


message 32: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments Lee wrote: "Mary, do you think it would be a good book for a book club read?"

Lee, I think that it would be an excellent book club read - so much to discuss! Christine, what do you think?


message 33: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Peregrine wrote: "I've finished Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century and have written a review."

Great review Peregrine. You've convinced me to give it go.


message 34: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Chrissie wrote: "Lee, I am really glad I read Cutting for Stone!"

I know you are Chrissie, thanks for saying that. I guess I never hesitated in recommending it because there were so many wonderful aspects to the story that overcame any squeamishness to the medical bits.


message 35: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "Lee wrote: "Mary, do you think it would be a good book for a book club read?"

Lee, I think that it would be an excellent book club read - so much to discuss! Christine, what do you think?"


Great! I'm thinking about recommending it for a group read in one of my book clubs.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Lee wrote: "I'm sorry you guys are bothered by the medical stuff. I guess I was more fascinated by the detail than grossed out. The only scene I remember feeling tense about was when the twins were born."

That's the scene that I just got through. So maybe I have faced the worst of it already.


message 37: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Can you believe that student nurse????


message 38: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments Lee wrote: "Peregrine wrote: "I've finished Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century and have written a review."

Great review Peregrine. You've convinced me to give it go."


Cool, Lee, thanks :-)


message 39: by Peregrine (new)

Peregrine | 91 comments Right into another fascinating, challenging book: Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy. I've read this once before, about half my life ago. It was seminal in my literary and political education.


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Lee wrote: "Can you believe that student nurse????"

No! AH! Ugh! That about sums it up. :)
Lee, I am very glad to be reading it, I didn't mean to imply otherwise. I'm just a baby.


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Mary wrote: "Lee wrote: "Mary, do you think it would be a good book for a book club read?"

Lee, I think that it would be an excellent book club read - so much to discuss! Christine, what do you think?"


Yes, good one for discussion for sure!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 529 comments Just finished one that wasn't a "comfort" read (more like a weird one) which I enjoyed: The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry.

Right now I am actually reading a comfort read: an Amelia Peabody mystery.


message 43: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Peregrine wrote: "Right into another fascinating, challenging book: Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy. I've read this once before, about half my life ago. It was seminal in my li..."

Peregrine, I read it half a lifetime ago too and loved it then. I think it's worth a re-read!


message 44: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Susanna wrote: "Just finished one that wasn't a "comfort" read (more like a weird one) which I enjoyed: The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry.

Right now I am actually reading a comfort read: an..."


The Manual of Detection looks like an unusual read Susanna. Do you recommend it for mystery readers? Is it hard to follow?


message 45: by Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (last edited Feb 25, 2010 03:32PM) (new)

Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 529 comments The books most like it that I have read are the Thursday Next books by Jasper Fforde. It is honestly a very strange book, but I enjoyed it.

It does have mystery elements, but it has a lot of other stuff, and overtones of Kafka.

The plot is pretty twisty.


message 46: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
Okay thanks. I haven't read the Thursday Next books yet so maybe I'll give those a try first. They seem to be quite popular.


Lisa  (not getting friends updates) Vegan (lisavegan) Yes, I'm caught up with the 5 Thursday Next books so far published and I really like that series. It's really fun.


message 48: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) I am reading Shutter Island -- definitely not a comfort read!


message 49: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments Diane D. wrote: "I am reading Shutter Island -- definitely not a comfort read!"

But so good !!


message 50: by Katri (new)

Katri (Valancy) | 68 comments Jeannette wrote: "How many languages can you read/speak? Five? Is there any Finnish Gothic romance translated to English? I confess I don't know any Finnish authors."

Hardly anybody knows Finnish authors. :P Even I don't read that many of them, though of course there's some really good stuff. But because we're such a small language area, very little of our literature gets translated into other languages, and even that little easily disappears into the massive volume in books available in a language like English. My favourite Finnish author is probably Tove Jansson, who wrote the Moomin books which are quite popular also outside our country. :-)

I'd be very surprise if any of that early Finnish gothic literature would be translated into English - most of it's not even generally available, because it wasn't exactly considered a valulable part of our literary canon and so has largely been forgotten. But I'm finding it culture-historically interesting to read about it, since it certainly was popular in its time like Gothic literature everywhere.

And um, I speak six languages, by the latest count. Finnish as native language, then English, French, Swedish, German and Hungarian. I can sort of read literature in all of them, though with Hungarian it has to be very easy literature... I really love learning languages, and have been blessed with great opportunities to do so. Helps that since our own language is so tiny, our education system makes sure we can learn lots of other languages if we're interested.


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