Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge discussion

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2020 Weekly Checkins > Week 41: 10/1 - 10/7

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message 1: by Nadine in NY (last edited Oct 08, 2020 04:24AM) (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Happy October!  The trees are beautiful in northern NY.  The weather is properly autumnal.

I'm having a stressful week - work has been crazy and I'm so sick of it, my kids need so much of my time with this remote learning, my kitchen sink started leaking and water was running down into the basement on Tuesday, and GR decided to stop giving us notifications.  

Kitchen sink is under repair.  (Big leak fixed, small leak to be tackled this weekend.)  I never thought I'd look forward to being able to wash dishes again!

The Goodreads thing really put me in a funk.  I guess with all the stress we are under with the pandemic and remote learning and US politics, it didn't take much to push me off the edge.  Well, that and news that Netflix canceled our new favorite show, Teenage Bounty Hunters, and there will be no season 2 to answer all the lingering questions from season 1 (which I have not quite finished yet).  [sad face]


Admin stuff
Other than the Goodreads snafu, not much.  Our October group read of Daisy Jones & The Six is ongoing here:https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Our new list will be out next month.  We don't know when. 




With all the stress, I haven't really read much this week.  I finished one book, part of my Latinx Heritage reading:

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez- this had some mixed reviews, so I wasn't sure what to expect. ... to my suprise, I REALLY enjoyed this!  The protagonist is rather unlikeable in the beginning, and for some readers that just kills the book.  Turns out this book was published in an October, so I checked off that category in the Fall Challenge.



Not really a QoTW, but still a question:  Does anyone follow the National Book Awards?  The last few years I've made an effort to read new books, so I can hopefully know some of the books that get short-listed for awards.  Out of the twenty-five finalists, I've heard of ... only one book.  (And I happen to have read that book - the graphic novel "When Stars are Scattered.")  I haven't even HEARD of the other books!  No buzz at all in my reading circles. 

 Fiction
Rumaan Alam, “Leave the World Behind”
Lydia Millet, “A Children’s Bible”
Deesha Philyaw, “The Secret Lives of Church Ladies”
Douglas Stuart, “Shuggie Bain”
Charles Yu, “Interior Chinatown”

Nonfiction
Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, “The Undocumented Americans”
Les Payne and Tamara Payne, “The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X”
Claudio Saunt, “Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory”
Jenn Shapland, “My Autobiography of Carson McCullers”
Jerald Walker, “How to Make a Slave and Other Essays”

Poetry
Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, “A Treatise on Stars”
Tommye Blount, “Fantasia for the Man in Blue”
Don Mee Choi, “DMZ Colony”
Anthony Cody, “Borderland Apocrypha”
Natalie Diaz, “Postcolonial Love Poem”

Translated Literature
Anja Kampmann, “High as the Waters Rise”
Translated from the German by Anne Posten
Jonas Hassen Khemiri, “The Family Clause”
Translated from the Swedish by Alice Menzies
Yu Miri, “Tokyo Ueno Station”
Translated from the Japanese by Morgan Giles
Pilar Quintana, “The Bitch”
Translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman
Adania Shibli, “Minor Detail”
Translated from the Arabic by Elisabeth Jaquette

Young People’s Literature
Kacen Callender, “King and the Dragonflies”
Traci Chee, “We Are Not Free”
Candice Iloh, “Every Body Looking”
Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed, “When Stars Are Scattered”
Gavriel Savit, “The Way Back”




Question of the Week
Did you have access to many books in your house as a child? If so, what kinds of books were they?



LOL not really!  But sort of.  My mom is a big believer in using the library, so I had full weekly access to our local library.  But my mom is also a big believer in NOT owning books - they are clutter, why have them, she never re-reads, etc.  It only made sense to own reference books, like a dictionary.  She also owned a Gray's Anatomy, which I never used, and a book with a short bio of every President (I'm pretty sure she bought that when Ford was President, because I seem to remember writing Carter's & Reagan's names in on the end paper).  

She would buy me a few books for gifts, and I got to buy some at the school bookmobile  (way back then we had a bookmobile - did you guys have  a bookmobile too? - now it's a "book fair" that Scholastic sets up inside the school).  Someone got me Marguerite Henry's All about Horses.  I always liked SFF, and I remember she bought me the box set of Asimov's Foundation trilogy (back then it was just a trilogy) and Tolkein's The Lord of the Rings series, so mom made good choices (and I always wondered how she managed that, since SHE didn't read SFF ... but I never asked) and I bought myself Wuthering Heights and Nine Strange Stories from the bookmobile, so I read those at a very young age.

My parents weren't big readers, so I never had that moment of discovering mom or dad's hidden cache of juicy books.  For some reason we had a copy of Jaws, I found that in the basement once.  I have no idea if my mom read that, I never asked.  (And I never read it.) 


message 2: by Lynn (last edited Oct 08, 2020 04:56AM) (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
I'm just bopping in to answer the Question of the Week. I'll post later this week or on the weekend once I've finished the two books I must complete asap! :)

Question of the Week
Did you have access to many books in your house as a child? If so, what kinds of books were they?


There was one very small bookstand in our house with my grandmother's books on it. Literally her elementary school reader and some other history books. They were so old they were very fragile and the stitching/binding was at least frayed and falling apart on some of them. Plus we had a set of encyclopedias. That was it in the house except for library books. My mother was very consistent in taking me to the library virtually every Saturday and I always brought home an armload of books. Every single week. And promptly inhaled them. Interestingly, I don't recall ever seeing my mother reading a book...

I can remember getting so desperate for reading material that once I was 10 or so I began reading the encyclopedias and grandmother's books. A couple of the history books were quite interesting. And that elementary school reader was so very quaint compared to my own elementary school books. (She was born in 1896 after all!) As I type this I am wondering what happened to those books, but I imagine when my grandmother down-sized from a huge old farm house to an apartment those were all thrown out. I was too busy raising three very young children at the time to even notice or wonder about them.

Thank goodness for the library because without that source of reading material I would have had only those encyclopedias! Plus when I was younger I was absolutely fascinated by picture books...okay, confession...I still am! :)

Although we had little disposable income (Well, truthfully, little income, period!) when my children were small, I did my best to keep books in the house. Scholastic books were great bargains, IMO. Plus I encouraged grandparents to purchase books for them. My grandmother typically gave me a chunk of money before Christmas so I could buy presents for my children and there were always at least 3-4 books per child included in that every year.

I can remember my former father-in-law coming up to our house one weekend and building shelves against one wall of our living room for our books. So at least my sons had some books in their house that were pertinent to them and their interests. That was a top priority for me as a parent. Plus we did go to the library at least once every two weeks and sometimes more often, though the librarians weren't exactly accommodating or even nice, so that was less enjoyable for them than it had been for me.

And now? Books tend to be my life. I anxiously anticipate any spare time I have so I can read. My oldest son surprised me by being somewhat of a reader and appreciative of books, particularly older classics and Shakespeare. (That latter one still makes me shake my head a bit.) My other two sons encourage their own children to read and read with/to them, but neither of them is really a reader. Of course, once their children are older perhaps that will change.

So happy notifications are restored! :)


message 3: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1195 comments Tried needle felting for the first time at the weekend, made a cute dog and discovered it's the perfect craft for listening to audiobooks. Only stabbed myself a couple of times.

So many people seemed to just be waiting for banned books week to finish the challenge, I feel so behind. I like to finish before the new list comes out but it might be a bit of a stretch, especially as I don't even have books picked out for my last 8 prompts.

Finished:
A Deadly Education for a book on the cover. I got very attached to the characters and didn't want the school to kill them. I'm not sure this will necessarily appeal to those looking for another Spinning Silver or Uprooted, but overall I enjoyed it. I have a fondness for boarding school stories.

The Passengers for ATY (news event) which is basically a thriller using the concept of the "trolley test" for automated cars. The characters were unrealistic and cliched, it threw in a lot of serious issues without much care and it went on too long after it had felt like it had finished. It was at least a quick read.

Don't Go Without Me for no reason other than it was a pretty graphic novel.

Before the Coffee Gets Cold for ATY (book one of binary opposites) which was quite sad, and fairly typical of the type of Japanese books that tend to get translated at the moment. Did not realise it was adapted from a play but makes total sense now I've read it.

Currently reading We Have Always Lived in the Castle for my 20th century book and still listening to The Fated Sky.

PS: 40/50 | ATY: 42/52 | GR: 88/100

QOTW:
Not huge numbers but I was always allowed to go and browse in charity shops for cheap books, and would usually get something when we had Scholastic book fairs. I read anything that involved horses, failing that other animals would suffice, and I remember a while of reading these American teen romance books that always turned up in charity shops. I cannot remember what they were called but I do still remember some of the plots. My dad mostly read non-fiction so I wasn't that interested in his books and mum was a big library user.

We lived in a tiny village so we had a library bus that came round once a week. They had shelves to browse or you could ask them to bring something from the main library. I borrowed a lot of Point Horror from them.


message 4: by Katy (new)

Katy M | 750 comments I finished Gold of Our Fathers as my book with gold silver or bronze in the title. It started out slowly, but I really got into it.

I'm now reading Les Miserables as a prior favorite, a book you see someone reading on TV (Brenda on 90210). Excellent thus far. I'm almost halfway through. I'm probably reading an abridged version though, even though it doesn't say it is. There are only 500 pages, and I was led to believe this was a super long book.

QOTW: Yes, definitely. Depending on what kind of books depends on the age, I guess. I had plenty of picture books as a young child. My favorite was Are You My Mother? I don't know why.

As I got older I would get books for Christmas and my birthday and my mother would let me pick out books from those Scholastic catalogs that you got at a school a couple of times a year. For gifts I got Paddington books, The Black Stallion books, Beverly Cleary, and pretty much any books that had anything to do with cats and horses.

In my "tween" years (before that was a word), there were Nancy Drew mysteries and Donna Rockford mysteries.

After that Iwould just raid my mom's and my sister's stash. I never really realized how good I had it in the reading department. Our house was full of books. We picked them up at tag sales. Especially loved when someone was just getting rid of a whole box for a dollar. We'd just buy it and read whatever happened to be in there.


message 5: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 874 comments Ellie wrote: "Tried needle felting for the first time at the weekend, made a cute dog and discovered it's the perfect craft for listening to audiobooks. Only stabbed myself a couple of times.

So many people see..."


You're not alone, I'm behind where I normally am too! I always try to finish before November so I can just read what I want for the last two months but this year really slowed down my reading.


message 6: by Ashley Marie (last edited Oct 08, 2020 05:26AM) (new)

Ashley Marie  | 470 comments Happy Thursday! This week has actually moved surprisingly fast for me. I need to get back to journaling so the days don't all blend together. On the home front, the house is all decorated for Halloween and we've got a stack of classic horror movies to plow through (which will probably take until November, which is fine with us).

On the book front, this week I finished:
The Old Guard, Book One: Opening Fire - 4 stars. I seem to be extremely picky about my comic book art lately, but story-wise this was fantastic. If you've seen the film on Netflix, it follows the book very nearly to the letter. Excited for volume 2!
The Haunting of Hill House - DNF. This took until the halfway mark to get spooky (???) and even then... meh.
Freedom Is a Constant Struggle - 4 stars. An excellent collection of speeches/essays and interviews from Angela Y Davis. As such, they can be a little repetitive, but fantastic material here.

Currently reading:
Beloved - for Banned Books Week
Cemetery Boys - for Latinx Heritage Month
Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World
Catwoman, Volume 1: Trail of the Catwoman

Did you have access to many books in your house as a child? If so, what kinds of books were they?
Oh yeah - my parents made sure that my sister and I had plenty to read. Berenstain Bears and Little Critter, + children's Bible stories (I grew up Catholic) were some of our favorites when we were small. And there was a big dictionary, which my dad would always point us toward when we asked what a word meant.

We may not have gone to the public library very often but I always ransacked my school library - biographies, fiction, it didn't matter. I devoured the Boxcar Children, Goosebumps, and BabySitters Club books.

As we got a bit older we considered the books on the higher shelves - Mom and Dad's books. Mom had a fat little pocket edition of Little Women that I never read but loved to look at - the cover art was beautiful. Dad has always had plenty of Stephen King, which we avoided at all costs. I don't really recall either of my parents reading or buying books often, but they definitely always encouraged us to read.


message 7: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 874 comments Hi everyone. I used up some annual leave this week to try to de-stress. Not sure how successful that was but at least I've had a bit of a lie in most days.

This week I finished....nothing! *shrug* I have a few chunksters lined up that are all going to take me over a week so I'm looking for a few skinnier books to slot in between to break them up a bit.

Currently reading: Doctor Zhivago still. I haven't read much at all since I've been off of work to be honest but I keep reading a little bit to keep it fresh in my mind.

QOTW: I had lots of books, but never enough. I always wanted more! I remember my local market used to have a stall selling second hand books and my mum would sometimes let me pick one or two, and the decision was so haaaaaaaard. I would go to the library quite often too. My parents would make me put the books in the boot of the car so I wouldn't have read them by the time we got home.


message 8: by Sherri (new)

Sherri Harris | 466 comments Hi All. Beautiful weather in Va. I also had issues with Goodreads this week. I went four days without notifications. I started getting them Wednesday afternoon. I read one book for the week. I feel like I’m reading really slow right now. Strange. I’m enjoying what I’m reading but just not reading fast. The Escape (John Puller #3) by David Baldacci. I have read this series for years but slowly. I read one book,wait years & read another. There’s only four books in the series. I like this series. I read the Camel Club series when it came out. Then I picked up the John Puller series. That’s all of his series I’ve read.
I follow a lot of the book awards but rarely have read the books nominated. I think The Secret Lives of Church Ladies by Deesha Philyaw looks interesting. I think I’ll read Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart. That also looks good.
QOTW: I’m going to say yes we had access to books when I was a child. My mom is a reader. I do have to say something funny about my mom reading. My mom is pretty much blind from macular degeneration. She can read on the iPad because of the lighting & large print. Mom is 89 years old & only reads regency romances. Growing up we had books in the house & we used the library.


message 9: by Samantha (new)

Samantha (bookstasamm) | 176 comments For some reason, I missed last week's check-in so I'll be posting for two weeks. I'll also answer both week's QOTW because I like last week's question.

Finished:
Anxious People - I thought this book started off a bit slow, but I ended up really enjoying it. I loved how all of the characters' stories came together in the end. 4 stars

All the Bright Places - I read this book for prompt #39 - read a banned book during Banned Books Week. It was banned at one school. I thought it handled the topics of mental illness and suicide well, and I'm glad I got the chance to finally read it. 4 stars

The Switch - I had an ARC of this book. It was a very cute take on people switching houses, and I really enjoyed it. The grandmother/granddaughter swap was a new take in this kind of story. 4 stars

In a Holidaze - this was my first book by Christina Lauren, and I really liked it. It's a Groundhog's Day type story with a time warp, but it's set at Christmas. I loved the setting and the way the authors transported me there. I look forward to reading more of their books. I used this for prompt #26 - a book with a pun in the title. 4 stars

Horrid - I started my spooky reads month off with this one, and I really liked it. The end me left me like "what?". It definitely had creepy vibes, and I didn't want to put it down. 4 stars

Four Dead Queens - a friend recommended this book to me because I'm starting to get into YA Fantasy. I liked this storyline a lot. Definitely worth checking out if you like this genre. 4 stars

The Stranger Beside Me: Ted Bundy: The Shocking Inside Story - so I read this for a facebook group pick, but realized I had the abridged version which is way shorter. I'll need to read the unabridged version because it left a lot out, and I didn't really understand the friendship between Ann Rule and Ted Bundy. I still thought it was written well though. 4 stars

Challenge Progress:
Regular challenge - 34/40
Advanced challenge - 8/10
Total - 42/50

Currently Reading:
Invisible Girl - I have an ARC of this, and so far, I'm really enjoying it.

My Best Friend's Exorcism - I thought this was a great book for my Spooktober reads. I love Grady Hendrix!

The Shadows - I plan on starting this tonight.

QOTW:

Are there any books or a book that you purposefully plan to read and/or reread at a specific time of year?


I always do Spooktober for the month of October where I read only spooky books (mysteries, thrillers, horror, true crime) and some fall themed books as well. It's usually my favorite month for reading!

I also like to read some Christmas stories around the holidays, but it's not something I always do.

Did you have access to many books in your house as a child? If so, what kinds of books were they?

Both of my parents love to read, and I have an older sister who is an avid reader as well so there were always books in my house.


message 10: by Sara (new)

Sara | 122 comments Can't believe it's already Thursday, this week is flying by! And I'm feeling ready for this three day weekend that is coming up. I have to set my out of office on my email and I usually kind of hedge on the holiday we are closed for, but I think I'm just going to go with Indigenous People's Day this year. Particularly since so many jurisdictions are canceling the holiday altogether and replacing it with Juneteenth.

This week I finished four books! Although, a few of them were pretty short. I read American Predator: The Hunt for the Most Meticulous Serial Killer of the 21st Century which was interesting. I don't read a lot of true crime, but I wanted some nonfiction for a change. This guy was seriously creepy, although I wish there had been just a little more information. I'm assuming that the information just wasn't available, but then why hint at it so strongly without coming out and saying what you mean.

I read The Amazing Spiderman : Volume 2 Revelations as my banned book. I really struggled with this prompt. So many banned books are old and not that interesting. I tried a couple different ones and just couldn't read them. So, I went with this banned/challenged comic. It's the famous post 9/11 issue of Spiderman, as well as the issue where Aunt May finds out his identity. It was challenged for being "too sexy" for children. I guess it had some frames of MJ in the shower and stuff, so maybe? But, I liked it.

I read When the Wind Blows as my medical thriller. This is another prompt that I really struggled with. I don't really like medical thrillers. I didn't love this book, but I was able to get through it and finish the prompt.

Finally, I finished Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King for the summer prompt for a book with "sun", etc. in the title. I thought this was interesting. Louis XIV lived a very long life, he had a super long reign, and he had a lot of mistresses and female relations.

QOTW: My parents were both readers and I had access to a lot of books growing up. Mostly they were books my mom had read and I was reading books that were maybe a bit mature for me. But, my parents kind of let me read whatever I pulled off the shelf. So, by 12 I was reading Kurt Vonnegut, Jean Auel, John Irving, Stephen King. Plus I was also reading some age appropriate books that I would get from school or scholastic. But, those years are when I definitely formed my tastes as a reader and John Irving is still my favorite author.


message 11: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Lynn wrote: "I'm just bopping in to answer the Question of the Week. I'll post later this week or on the weekend once I've finished the two books I must complete asap! :)

Question of the Week
Did you have acce..."



Look! we have stuff in common!!! We were both regular library users with few books owned, and we both still like picture books! :-)


message 12: by Kenya (last edited Oct 08, 2020 07:06AM) (new)

Kenya Starflight | 668 comments Is anyone else ready for 2020 to be over? Bleh...

I actually added a book to Goodreads for the first time ever this week! I read a book that had absolutely no listing whatsoever but still wanted to count it for some reason -- "Diesel," as seen below -- so there ya go.

Books read this week:

The Sea Beast Takes a Lover: Stories -- Story collection. I like quirky stories, but these stories feel like they were trying a little too hard to be quirky. Imaginative but unsatisfying.

Too Young To Be Old: From Clapham to Kathmandu -- I was going to read Kevin And I In India, but since this one was advertised as a prequel to it, I figured I should get it out of the way first. Funny, and I learned some things about Buddhism I hadn’t known before.

The Midnight Library -- Wow… this could have been a really sappy and melodramatic read, given its concept, but I really enjoyed it! Need to give this author another shot...

Diesel -- I hunted down and read an online scan of this comic because I’d heard about it through rumors that it was an American ripoff of the “JoJo’s Bizarre Adventures” anime/manga franchise. And honestly I just wanted to see if it was as terrible as the rest of the manga community said it was. (view spoiler)

DNF:

The Library of the Unwritten -- for whatever reason I couldn't get into it.

Currently Reading:

A Game of Universe
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories
Kevin And I In India
The Hollow Places

QOTW:

I grew up with TONS of books! My siblings and I had access to a variety of kids books, from Dr. Seuss to religious books to fairy tales, and both my parents read to me quite a bit. And my grandma would send us audiocassettes with her reading books aloud on them, along with the book itself to read along with her.

Oddly, despite all this, my mom was STILL shocked when she enrolled me into kindergarten and the teacher discovered I'd taught myself how to read before I even started school. And our family still owns a lot of books and reads voraciously.


message 13: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Sherri wrote: "The Escape (John Puller #3) by David Baldacci. I have read this series for years but slowly. I read one book,wait years & read another. There’s only four books in the series. I like this series. I read the Camel Club series when it came out. Then I picked up the John Puller series. That’s all of his series I’ve read...."


I really like his Will Robie series! I haven't read any others.

One of my fears is macular degeneration - good to know if I get it I could maybe still get by reading Kindles!


message 14: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Not much to report this week. Sometimes I think that’s a really, really good thing! I really enjoy the times when life is quiet and the chaos stays in the background. I’m working hard to do my part, but not let the political noise bleed through. Reading is helping a lot with that.

Finished
The Guest List by Lucy Foley. I really liked this one. I liked The Hunting Party better, but this was still very good. Lucy Foley is one of my must read authors now.

Heartbeat Braves by Pamela Sanderson. This is a sweet romance. I really liked the characters and their relationship. The author gets bonus points for not using a misunderstanding as the conflict. This is an #ownvoices Native romance. I think that’s something this group was looking for at one point? The book addresses topics like racism, honoring elders, different tribal traditions, etc so there are serious moments, but it’s mostly a lighthearted book.

DNF
Semiosis by Sue Burke. Maybe I’ll try again later. I like the concept of sentient plants, but I’m not connecting with the characters or writing.

Reading
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present by David Treuer

QOTW
We had a limited number of books at home. We had a series of educational Disney books with cassette tapes. And we had a series of Bible stories and morality tales. The morality stories were all about naughty children who got caught and learned their lesson. Honestly, all they did was give me ideas! I don’t remember loving any of these books or stories, but I loved reading so much that I reread them constantly. Only one picture books survived my childhood rereadings. The pages fell out of the rest of them. The Adventures of Adam Raccoon: Circus Master

We lived in an unincorporated area so we didn’t have a public library. I relied on my school library for books. We went to the library once a week as a class, but we were allowed to go in the morning if our bus arrived early enough. Fortunately, my bus driver always dropped us off with a 15-20 minute cushion so I could drop my stuff in the coat room and run down to the library to get more books. Later, when we got the Scholastic book catalogs and book fairs, I spent every last cent of my allowance on books.


message 15: by Tania (new)

Tania | 545 comments As it turns out, it really doesn't take much to put me in a funk since quarantine started. How easily we are disrupted when our routines change. All I have to do is walk into a store and realize they are STILL out of whatever I'm looking for, after weeks and weeks, and it's like there's a dark cloud over my head. Or the incredibly slow shipping times that have become the norm, even when you pay for expedited shipping. It's pumpkin spice season, at least, so that's my go-to pick-me-up.

Sorry about your show - I hate early cancellations.

I'm glad to see Goodreads Notifications seem to be back, that was super annoying to me as well. Seriously, short fuse on annoyance these days, lol.

Finished this week:
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - used for my banned book during banned books week

The last two from the Out of Line collection on Amazon Prime:
Bear Witness by Mary Gaitskill - I thought the jumps in narration were distracting, and took away from the story
Shine, Pamela! Shine! by Kate Atkinson - really good but incredibly weird ending

Open Minds by Susan Kaye Quinn - the first in the Mindjack series, this was on my TBR for a long time, once I started reading I couldn't stop.

QOTW: I fell in love with books at a very early age, and luckily that was encouraged by my mom, my grandma, and my cousin (she was 12 years older than I, so a frequent babysitter for us), all of whom I spent a lot of time with and looked up to. I had access to all the books I could want - at home we had Golden books, a set of Encyclopedias, and I would get a couple of books for Christmas and Birthdays each year. My cousin had a wall full of books - every Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys and Black Stallion book, plus all sorts of others, and she let me borrow whatever I wanted. I had the school library, which was well stocked and I was constantly checking books out of, as well as the public library where my mom would take us every other week.


message 16: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Ellie wrote: "So many people seemed to just be waiting for banned books week to finish the challenge, I feel so behind. I like to finish before the new list comes out but it might be a bit of a stretch, especially as I don't even have books picked out for my last 8 prompts. ..."



I've always had it well in hand, but yes this year I'm starting to wonder if I will actually finish by December! I only have a few categories left, and most of them will be easy, but one of them is "Women in STEM" for which I'm insisting to myself that I read a non-fiction book about the topic. I have The Madame Curie Complex: The Hidden History of Women in Science picked out, and it does not look like a fast read. Right now I'm reading One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy, which isn't for the Challenge at all, and it's rather dry and loaded with detail so I'm kind of stalled. But it's such an important book, I can't bring myself to DNF and move on!!


message 17: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Nadine wrote: "But my mom is also a big believer in NOT owning books - they are clutter, why have them, she never re-reads, etc. It only made sense to own reference books, like a dictionary."

This is exactly what my mom said! It wasn't so bad during the school year when I could check out books from the school library, but we didn't have access to the public library so summer was endlessly rereading the same few books we had at home. I love using my public library, but I also like having full bookshelves at home. Maybe it's leftover dismay from those book drought summers.


message 18: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Kenya wrote: "... Oddly, despite all this, my mom was STILL shocked when she enrolled me into kindergarten and the teacher discovered I'd taught myself how to read before I even started school. ..."


LOL this happened to me, too!!! I was a quiet child, so the teacher apparently just stuck me in a learning-to-read group, and when it was my turn, I whizzzed across the pages, so she called my mom up and said something like "well! Nadine is quite the reader!" and my mother didn't know either. Mom theorizes that I liked being read to so much, I never let on that I could read by myself.


message 19: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "... Heartbeat Braves by Pamela Sanderson. This is a sweet romance. I really liked the characters and their relationship. The author gets bonus points for not using a misunderstanding as the conflict. This is an #ownvoices Native romance. I think that’s something this group was looking for at one point? The book addresses topics like racism, honoring elders, different tribal traditions, etc so there are serious moments, but it’s mostly a lighthearted book. ..."



YES!! I was probably the one looking for that!!! I'm so excited, even more excited to hear that the book is good, I'll definitely be reading this! thank you for telling us about it :-)


message 20: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "... I love using my public library, but I also like having full bookshelves at home. Maybe it's leftover dismay from those book drought summers. ..."



Yes, I definitely went a little overboard with buying books when I moved out. It took several decades, but I'm starting to see mom's point about clutter. I still buy books, but not many (and often I buy the ebook - no clutter!). My few bookshelves are FULL, and I've got boxes and boxes of books that I've never unpacked from my last move, and I've got stacks of books on the floors ... it's too much.


message 21: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 159 comments Morning,

This last week at work has been crazy, it's finally slowing down a bit and I'm getting my actual work done. I didn't get a chance to update last week, so I'm just going to combine the last two weeks.

Finished Reading:

Piranesi - This was such an odd book but I really enjoyed. I just wanted to keep reading it to find out what was going on.

Between the World and Me - I listened to this on on audio and it was very powerful in that format. I highly recommend this.

The Night Swim - This was a fun, quick thriller. I enjoyed it. I was surprised by the ending, so that made me happy. There were a few wording things in the book that bothered me but didn't take away from my enjoyment of the book overall.

I Have Something to Tell You - I listened to this on audio as well and it was read by Chasten Buttigieg and it was delightful. He's pretty delightful and funny. He's also pretty honest about his life and how it wasn't always sunshine and rainbows and how he isn't perfect. It made me like him even more.

Frankenstein - This was my banned books week book. I really like it and the writing is stunning. It did take me all week because I just wasn't in the mood for it. I'm going to have to re-visit it when I'm in the right head space for it.

The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History for a book on a subject you know nothing about. I listened to this on audio and loved it. It's so interesting and I didn't realize how horrible the medical community in America was at the time!

Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?: Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death by Caitlin Doughty, W. W. Norton & Company - This was another audiobook for me and only four hours long. It was funny and interesting.

Practical Magic for a book you meant to read in 2019. I bought this last year wanting to read it in October and didn't get to it. Honestly, I wish I didn't read it. I did not like it. I don't mind unlikable characters but I don't think that was Hoffman's aim for them. I just didn't like a majority of the characters in the book. I won't be continuing the series.

The One - I have heard people raving about this one, especially the audiobook. It lived up to the hype for me. It was so good, so engaging and kept me wanting to listen to more. It's going to be made into a series for Netflix and I can't wait to watch it.

Currently Reading:

When No One is Watching - I'm still too early in this one to judge it but so far so good.

Bad Feminist - This is my new audiobook for the week and so far I'm really enjoying it.

Breakfast of Champions - My boss loaned me a stack of Vonnegut books when I said I had never read him before. My boss said this is his favorite. I'm not too far into it but it's already been pretty funny. I'm looking forward to digging into the stack over the next few months.


message 22: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Katy wrote: "In my "tween" years (before that was a word), there were Nancy Drew mysteries and Donna Rockford mysteries."

I know exactly what you mean by before "tween" was a word! :)

Never heard of the Donna Rockford mysteries. I'll check those out for my grandchildren...


message 23: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1195 comments Heather wrote: "Semiosis by Sue Burke. Maybe I’ll try again later. I like the concept of sentient plants, but I’m not connecting with the characters or writing...."

I thought the concept and all the interesting botany bits were fantastic but I did really struggle with the new set of characters for every generation, definitely not a book for those who prefer character driven stories.


message 24: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Nadine wrote: "Happy October!  The trees are beautiful in northern NY.  The weather is properly autumnal.

I'm having a stressful week - work has been crazy and I'm so sick of it, my kids need so much of my time ..."

Must be this week! Something is amiss in the Universe I guess! ;)

"Not really a QoTW, but still a question: Does anyone follow the National Book Awards? The last few years I've made an effort to read new books, so I can hopefully know some of the books that get short-listed for awards. Out of the twenty-five finalists, I've heard of ... only one book. (And I happen to have read that book - the graphic novel "When Stars are Scattered.") I haven't even HEARD of the other books! No buzz at all in my reading circles."
I noticed this, too! I was grateful to see such a diversity in the authors and books. I thought this was rather refreshing and if I had the time would definitely read as many as I could, but I have challenges and buddy reads to finish! :)


message 25: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1195 comments Nadine wrote: "It took several decades, but I'm starting to see mom's point about clutter...."

This year has really not helped my book clutter. I usually offload bags of books at the charity shop every few months but now I have to phone up and check they have space to quarantine donations so I just haven't bothered. My partner was doing a little side project to set up an online shop to sell them, but he has been super busy too and so the books just keep piling up.


message 26: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Nadine wrote: "Heather wrote: "... Heartbeat Braves by Pamela Sanderson. This is a sweet romance. I really liked the characters and their relationship. The author gets bonus points for not using a misunderstandin..."

If you're on twitter @ettubrody gives good recommendations for Indigenous lit. They had a thread where followers gave their favorite genres and Brody gave them recs from Indigenous writers. This was the romance rec. As it turns out, I didn't like that tweet (ugh! why not!?) or I'd link to the whole thread.


message 27: by Katelyn (new)

Katelyn | 200 comments Happy Foggy Thursday from the Pacific NW. Fall is finally here!

Finished:

Fleishman Is in Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner (book with an upside down image on the cover). I have had this book on my list for this prompt since the beginning and I don't know why I waited so long to read it. It was hilarious! Much better than I was expecting. The summary doesn't do it justice - highly recommend.

Currently Reading:

Yup, still working my way through Troubled Blood - I am at the part where it is starting to get dull and dragging on. I have never read a book this long before (927 pages) I think the longest was 700-something. Too many characters to remember. I feel like the killer will be revealed and I will be like "who is that?" and have to flip back through the book.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer (a fellow Washingtonian!). I heard so many positive things about this book on Goodreads that I finally caved and started it (book with a robot, cyborg, or AI character). It is really good! Better than I expected. I was dreading this prompt - robots aren't really my thing - but I am really enjoying this book.

I read through the National Book Award finalists and hadn't heard of any of them. There were some books that were long-listed but none of the finalists I recognized.

QOTW:
Oh boy did I collect books like they were going out of style! I not only had a library down the street from me but by the time I turned 8 I could ride my bike (with a friend, not alone) down there and check out books on my own.

While other kids dragged their parents to toy stores, I was running to Walden/Borders/Barnes and Nobles...basically anywhere that sold books. My parents didn't like a lot of toys but always encouraged me to buy a book instead. I flew through Goosebumps, then graduated to Fear Street. I book-swapped Babysitters Club with friends.

My mom and grandmother were big readers so once I blew through my age group books I started reading my mother's more "adult" books. I remember my dad only reading Jimmy Buffett memoirs like A Pirate Looks at Forty but I think he read others too.


message 28: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1195 comments Heather wrote: "As it turns out, I didn't like that tweet (ugh! why not!?) or I'd link to the whole thread..."

Here you go:
https://twitter.com/ettubrody/status/...


message 29: by Sheri (new)

Sheri | 772 comments Hi everyone,

Have a burst of lovely weather this week, been sunny and in the high 60's, low 70s. Will carry through the weekend, and then back to cold gross fall. Enjoying the patio while we still can!

Also I went to the library for the first time since all this started, just for a quick hold pick up and scan of the new release shelf. Picked up three books, so that was cool. They have a uv sanitizer in the lobby now, so you can blast the books before you take em home, aside from the general quarantine/handling with gloves and masks routines.

This week I finished:

Lab Girl - This was pretty interesting, I admit i know very little about plants aside from what we learned in high school biology. Lots of cool information as well as a glimpse into the life of curiosity-driven research science. (as opposed to product-based stuff like medicine research, or creating materials for products). I liked it, using it for my book about nature for the fall reading challenge.

Anxious People - I know Backman is divisive here, and someone else posted they just couldn't get into this one. But I loved it! I've basically struggled with adhd and anxiety my whole life, though I never got formally tested or treated for it (I was going to make steps to that back in February but then....everything else happened so that got put on hold.) I actually found it kind of reassuring to read a book full of people dealing with their own mental issues. Parts of it actually made me laugh out loud, which I rarely do, even when reading humor books.

Currently reading:

Harrow the Ninth - I LOVED Gideon the Ninth so was really excited that this was in when I was at the library. I'm having a harder time getting into this one, it's told in 2nd person which is kind of weird, and the timeline is very all over. I'm hoping once I get into it more it'll start coming together.

Nocturna - finally got this back in, still not done though. Probably should have just grabbed the physical copy at the library, woudl go so much faster haha. Oh well.

QOTW:

Yes, for sure. My mom taught second grade, so had tons of books for her classroom. I always had a bookshelf crammed full in my bedroom. I'd generally get first dibs on reading any books that she bought for the classroom, when i was in that age bracket. Also I'd go into her classroom the first and last weeks of summer break to help close/open her classroom, so would often take reading breaks in between helping. As I got older I'd join my mom on trips to the used bookstore. we did use the library some, but the selection wasn't amazing and the inter-library loan system wasn't as robust. So we tended to go to the local used bookstores at least once a month, dropping off any books we were done with and coming home with bags full. My mom was a big romance reader so she'd go through HUGE amounts of them. I was much more reluctant to turn my books back in, I liked keeping them for re-reading haha. I'd try to use her credits for my books, but apparently sci-fi/fantasy readers tend to be bigger book hoarders than other genres. They didn't like trading romance for sci-fi/fantasy, they wanted even exchanges.

I will say though, that my love of reading/ being read to as a kid didn't translate into early reading like some of you all. In kindergarten I could piece together the individual words, but i couldn't grasp them as sentences. Started first grade in the bottom reading level. Apparently something clicked that year, though, because I finished the year in the top group. I did start kindergarten at age 4, due to a fall birthday, so it's possible it was an age thing.


message 30: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Nadine wrote: "Yes, I definitely went a little overboard with buying books when I moved out. It took several decades, but I'm starting to see mom's point about clutter."

Same! For awhile I gave myself a budget each month to buy all my favorite books so they could sit on my shelves. Now that I have full bookcases, I've calmed down. I hate clutter so I'm never going to be the person with stacks of books or books lining walls. I have a very tidy and decorative TBR wicker basket sitting beside my bookcase.) I donate a lot of the books I buy now to the public library. I think they're happy to receive them, even if it's just for their annual book sale.


message 31: by Tania (new)

Tania | 545 comments Kenya wrote: "QOTW:

I grew up with TONS of books! My siblings and I had access to a variety of kids books, from Dr. Seuss to religious books to fairy tales, and both my parents read to me quite a bit. And my grandma would send us audiocassettes with her reading books aloud on them, along with the book itself to read along with her.

Oddly, despite all this, my mom was STILL shocked when she enrolled me into kindergarten and the teacher discovered I'd taught myself how to read before I even started school. And our family still owns a lot of books and reads voraciously...."


Wow, that's really cool about your grandmother sending the cassette of her reading and the book! I love that idea, and what a lot of thought and time must have gone into it.

My earliest memories are of my mom reading to me on the front porch; she says that I used to make her read the same book to me over and over until I had memorized it, and then I would pretend to read it myself - that's apparently how I learned to read as well. By the time I was in kindergarten I was reading chapter books. My mom always seemed disappointed that she felt like I taught myself, but I certainly couldn't have done it without her reading to me. I should probably say that to her...


message 32: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Ellie wrote: "Tried needle felting for the first time at the weekend, made a cute dog and discovered it's the perfect craft for listening to audiobooks. Only stabbed myself a couple of times."
LOL Definitely made me laugh! Never heard of needle felting so now I must Google! I"ll say it again, I am amazed at those of you who are capable of listening to a book while you do needlework, etc.

"So many people seemed to just be waiting for banned books week to finish the challenge, I feel so behind. I like to finish before the new list comes out but it might be a bit of a stretch, especially as I don't even have books picked out for my last 8 prompts."
I do not believe you are "behind" at all! It's just early October! :)


message 33: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Ellie wrote: "I thought the concept and all the interesting botany bits were fantastic but I did really struggle with the new set of characters for every generation, definitely not a book for those who prefer character driven stories."

I read three generations before DNFing. I think that's what bothered me most about the book. The summary says it's character-driven, but skipping forward in time with big gaps in characters' journeys is not my definition of character-driven. I might try again another time when I'm in the mood for something more high concept.


message 34: by Heather (new)

Heather (heatherbowman) | 722 comments Ellie wrote: "Heather wrote: "As it turns out, I didn't like that tweet (ugh! why not!?) or I'd link to the whole thread..."

Here you go:
https://twitter.com/ettubrody/status/..."


Thanks! And liked so I can find it again.


message 35: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "QOTW: I had lots of books, but never enough. I always wanted more! I remember my local market used to have a stall selling second hand books and my mum would sometimes let me pick one or two, and the decision was so haaaaaaaard. I would go to the library quite often too. My parents would make me put the books in the boot of the car so I wouldn't have read them by the time we got home."

They wanted to make sure they had additional peace and quiet once they reached home I bet! LOL


message 36: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Sherri wrote: "QOTW: I’m going to say yes we had access to books when I was a child. My mom is a reader. I do have to say something funny about my mom reading. My mom is pretty much blind from macular degeneration. She can read on the iPad because of the lighting & large print. Mom is 89 years old & only reads regency romances. Growing up we had books in the house & we used the library."

I am so sorry for your mother's visual challenges. I guess when you're 89 years old you can read whatever you want to read! ;)


message 37: by Sheri (new)

Sheri | 772 comments I finished Semiosis, but yeah it was a bit of a slog. I found it interesting, but not really engrossing. I didn't rush out and read the second, might eventually but it's not high priority. I agree, it was a little difficult with the new generations every section, I don't love that format usually. I didn't like Homegoing as much as everyone else seems to for the same reason, found it hard to really get invested when the characters kept shifting. Although I did love Pachinko and it does the same thing. So I guess MOST the time that format doesn't work for me. But Pachinko still had the new generations interacting with the previous ones, even if the focus shifted, so that might be part of it. It didn't just totally break from the previous characters.


message 38: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Samantha wrote: "All the Bright Places - I read this book for prompt #39 - read a banned book during Banned Books Week. It was banned at one school. I thought it handled the topics of mental illness and suicide well, and I'm glad I got the chance to finally read it. 4 stars"
Ack! I keep seeing others read this. I have owned it for at least 4 years and keep meaning to read it... Maybe in 2021?

"In a Holidaze - this was my first book by Christina Lauren, and I really liked it. It's a Groundhog's Day type story with a time warp, but it's set at Christmas. I loved the setting and the way the authors transported me there. I look forward to reading more of their books. I used this for prompt #26 - a book with a pun in the title. 4 stars"
They also wrote The Unhoneymooners which I really enjoyed!


message 39: by Lynn (new)

Lynn (book_music_lvr) | 3575 comments Mod
Nadine wrote: "Look! we have stuff in common!!! We were both regular library users with few books owned, and we both still like picture books! :-)"

YAY!!! ;)


message 40: by Cornerofmadness (new)

Cornerofmadness | 437 comments I missed last week which was okay. I hadn't read anything. This is the longest it's taken me to finish this challenge but given this year that's okay too

The first book you touch on a shelf with your eyes closed I read
Hallelujah by Kim Fielding & F.E. Feely jr which is a LGBT horror with maybe a few too many currently political horrors tied into it for me but otherwise I really enjoyed it.

I did read Consumed by J. R. Ward for something that won an award in 2019. I didn't bookmark the award and can't find it now and this thing sucked. Internalized misogyny and toxic masculinity with the alphahole man as THE ideal man in a romance. It wasn't worth my time. I'll use it if I can't find a better award winner.

For the prompt A fiction or nonfiction book about a world leader I read These Honored Dead by Jonathan F. Putnam. Abraham Lincoln as the Sherlock to Speed's Watson was how it was billed. It was more a courtroom drama which isn't surprising. It was okay but it's hard to like Speed.

For the prompt A book by or about a journalist I read People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo--and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up by Richard Lloyd Parry It's a well detailed true crime book by a journalist.



QOTW Oh yes, Mom was a huge reader. We had tons of books growing up ones we owned, ones we got from the library. If I was fussy while shopping, she'd get me a book to shut me up so now I have storage units full of books. Thanks for the addiction Mom


message 41: by Alex (new)

Alex of Yoe (alexandraofyoe) | 159 comments The trees keep turning. I'm so excited. I can't believe how fast the year has gone.

Finished 39/50

Oh we are SO CLOSE. I'm gonna be down to the hour on this challenge, I can already tell.

Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea for "book by a journalist". Oh this was so good. And so sad. I was already appalled by the North Korean regime, and this book made it worse. I cannot believe what these people are going through. Absolutely sickening. I'm grateful for the 6 brave people who allowed their stories to be told in this book. It's amazing the things they went through. Hugely recommend.

Currently Reading

In Twenty Years for "book with twenty in the title". I'm about halfway through. It isn't knocking my socks off, but so far it's not bad. Kinda whiny though.

The Wilderness Journal: 365 Days with the Philokalia for "book whose title caught your attention". My attention is gone, man. This book is really only ok. It needs more voices imho. I think asking this author to do 365 reflections by herself was beyond her.

QotW

Yes! My mother homeschooled us for most of my elementary school days, so we had books galore and our own mini-library. She read a lot, and I couldn't wait to learn my letters and be able to read too. We had lots of historical fiction. I gobbled up the Dear America books. Also Little House series, Narnia, there was a book on Pompeii that I loved, some Roald Dahl, a book on weather....so many books, plus whatever we could grab at the church library. We downsized after we moved and went into public school, but trips to the library were common. Come to think of it, though, I never could find my mom's stash of books. I did steal my dad's copy of 1984 though.


message 42: by Katelyn (new)

Katelyn | 200 comments Ellie wrote: "Tried needle felting for the first time at the weekend, made a cute dog and discovered it's the perfect craft for listening to audiobooks. Only stabbed myself a couple of times.

So many people see..."


Goodreads likes to remind me how behind I am in reading (currently 2 books behind schedule). Ugh.

I do find it interesting how COVID-19 has either increased or slowed down someone's reading. Some people finished very early and others are behind where they usually are.


message 43: by Christy (new)

Christy | 351 comments Hello all! I have the windows open and I'm *wearing a sweatshirt*! Such joy!

Finished this week: Gideon the Ninth: as everyone else has said, it's really fun.
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul: I don't find Douglas Adams laugh-out-loud funny, but I do enjoy his turns of phrase, and turns of plot. I definitely liked this one better than the first Dirk Gently. And with this book I finished the Around the Year in 52 Books 2020 challenge! Huzzah! (I still have 3 to go on Popsugar)

Currently reading:
A Girl Is a Body of Water: a Ugandan feminist coming of age story, which is very much up my alley

QOTW: I am a Librarian's Kid, so the answer to this is an emphatic yes! My mom was an enthusiastic patron of the public library, so we went almost every week, and returned home with at least 10 books each. She also believed in building one's personal library to be surrounded with favorite (and potential favorite) books. After she passed away we had a few gatherings with family where people could peruse her shelves and take books that interested them, which was a nice way to honor her.


message 44: by Melissa (last edited Oct 08, 2020 12:34PM) (new)

Melissa | 256 comments Hello! I'm so glad the notifications are back. Those days without them were very unpleasant. My Kindle has been giving me headaches if I read at night, so I'd been avoiding ebooks for about a month. My husband gave me his tinted glasses for computer screens, and I was able to wear them over my own glasses without too much discomfort or eye strain. I was able to read about a third of the way through an ebook Tuesday night, which felt nice. Still have a huge stack of physical books I need to read and give back to the library...

I haven't heard of any of those books for the National Book Awards.

Finished this Week:
The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini by Joe Posnanski - Joe is a sportswriter I've followed since he was on location at Penn State to write a book about Joe Paterno when all of the Sandusky stuff went down. I started listening to his podcast (the Poscast) with Michael Schur, creator of Parks & Rec and the Good Place, because they talked about the most random things, plus sports. So when I saw there was a prompt for a book recommended by your favorite podcast, I knew I had to read Joe's book about Harry Houdini, which he mentioned endlessly while writing and then when it came out. It also counts for PS Fall, since it was published last October. It's both a biography of Houdini and about his enduring place in our culture.

We Sold Our Souls by Grady Hendrix - I used this for Read Harder's indie horror prompt. I don't read horror, so if this is typical of the genre, I probably could. The scariest parts were a shooting and some claustrophobia. Quite enjoyed it.

The Giver by Lois Lowry. Never read this as a kid, and saw there wasn't a wait list for it at the library. Knocked it out in an afternoon. Feel kind of meh about it. I think it would have meant more if I *had* read it as a kid. Counts for ATY #8, two word title with The.

Ignite the Stars by Maura Milan - a reading challenge I found before I found the Goodreads groups had one to read a book with "Stars" in the title. I found this YA science fiction book and loved it. The second book in the duology is waiting for me at the library. I'm also counting it for PS Fall #6, strong friendship.

Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes by Robin Ha - I finally finished it. I need to find out if there's an Korean grocery store anywhere near me, because I want to try a lot of these recipes now. It's still weird to read a cookbook cover to cover.

PS: 47/50 RHC: 20/24 RW: 23/26 ATY: 49/52 PS Fall: 2/10

Currently Reading:

Eva Luna by Isabel Allende - Reading Women bonus prompt. I'm about a third of the way, and liking it so far.

Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth by Rachel Maddow - still chugging along

Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid - my library had a 90 person wait list for it, so I figured I wouldn't get it in time. It took only three weeks for my hold to come in. Looking forward to joining the discussion.

QOTW It's weird, whenever I think about reading and libraries, the person who comes to mind is me in middle school and high school, not younger. I had to think hard about reading as a kid.

My dad is an avid reader (and re-reader). He loved science fiction in the 60s and 70s. He also loves reading history, especially the Civil War and World War II. He got Asimov's SF magazine well into the 90s, and only canceled his subscription when it became Science Fiction and Fantasy (instead of just SF). At some point (it must have been the late 80s), he bought a bunch of lumber and built floor to ceiling bookshelves in the basement, with each shelf exactly the height for a mass market paperback. (Don't let him get started on those oversize books.) Literally surrounded by books, I turned into a reader like my dad. Dad likes to tell the story about how when we were little, he was reading to me and my sister and fell asleep, only to wake up to cries of "Read, Daddy, Read!"

As a child, there were always books around. I know I had those read-along books with audio cassettes (and a few on vinyl!) of Disney stories or Rainbow Brite. I had plenty of Golden Books and the Berenstain Bears. Series like The Babysitters Club, the Bobbsey Twins, the Boxcar Children, Ramona - I read them all. I don't remember books as special treats, so they must have just been omnipresent. I know I read (and reread) child version biographies from the elementary school library.

It wasn't until middle school that I started stealthily reading Mom's romances. Dad didn't have me start reading his SF books until high school, but the history books came out whenever I expressed an interest. (They got me At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor when I was 12. That is not a book for an twelve year old.) I started going to the library by myself in 7th grade, and read everything in the teen section.

My mom likes to read, but she isn't a re-reader. Once she knows the story, she doesn't see a need to read it again. My sister doesn't really read at all. Every now and then, Dad will take me aside and make me promise to not let Mom get rid of all his books when he dies.


message 45: by Tania (new)

Tania | 545 comments Katelyn wrote: "Goodreads likes to remind me how behind I am in reading (currently 2 books behind schedule). Ugh.

I do find it interesting how COVID-19 has either increased or slowed down someone's reading. Some people finished very early and others are behind where they usually are...."


Lucky you - it's telling me I'm 8 behind! The first 2 months this year I was really ramped up on reading, I think I went into quarantine 15 books ahead of schedule... and I've been behind ever since lol. The first month of COVID I only read 3 books. The last couple of months have been more on my regular pace, but obviously at some point in the next 3 months I'll have to either adjust my expectations or pick up the pace.


message 46: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (seejessread) | 239 comments Nadine wrote: "Happy October!  The trees are beautiful in northern NY.  The weather is properly autumnal.

I'm having a stressful week - work has been crazy and I'm so sick of it, my kids need so much of my time ..."


I haven't heard of a lot of these books either. There has been a lot of hype for Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, “The Undocumented Americans” on bookstagram. Rumaan Alam, “Leave the World Behind” is a book of the month choice. Charles Yu, “Interior Chinatown” has been on my list for a while.


message 47: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6432 comments Mod
Ellie wrote: "Heather wrote: "As it turns out, I didn't like that tweet (ugh! why not!?) or I'd link to the whole thread..."

Here you go:
https://twitter.com/ettubrody/status/..."



thanks!!


message 48: by Drakeryn (new)

Drakeryn | 708 comments Not much read this week - been busy with inktober and other stuff - but I'm here for the QotW!

QotW: Yep! Dad had a big collection of books, mostly nonfiction (aside from Lord of the Rings which I adored). A lot of it was Christian literature; I remember reading with fascination a book about cults and how they twist scripture in order to "get" you.

I also remember being five and avidly reading all my parents' childcare books in advance of my little brother being born. (I was excited. I wanted a brother to play with.) The books talked a lot about older siblings being jealous, reverting to baby-like behavior for attention, etc. and I decided that was DUMB and I was NOT going to do any of that.

Mom would often take me to the library. She would look up lists of Newbery medalists and borrow those books for me. We also had a bookmobile at school...though, come to think of it, it also changed to a "book fair" in the school library.


message 49: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1195 comments Katelyn wrote: "I do find it interesting how COVID-19 has either increased or slowed down someone's reading. Some people finished very early and others are behind where they usually are..."

I think if I'd been furloughed or had reduced hours I would have read more, but I guess I'm fortunate that my job was not affected (other than working from home). I just had trouble switching off from everything for a few months (my job is in healthcare IT so it was a constant reminder) and turned to Animal Crossing instead of reading for my downtime. Now that game is a massive time suck!


message 50: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 737 comments Hi all! Pretty leaves and cooler temps. Yipp. ee. Lol.
So we've all gotten colds, again! and if you're saying, Jen, weren't you just sick a month ago? yes, yes I was. I slept in this morning until almost noon and feel like I could keep sleeping until tomorrow at noon. I'm just whining- I'm not that ill. Certainly could be much, much worse.

So, I haven't finished anything. About halfway through Kent State, which is an interesting way to write this book, I'm not sure if I like the style or not.

I also started Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law, which I think will be an easy read, I just haven't had the energy for it.

QOTW: We had tons of books as kids! Dr. Seuss, Barenstein Bears, Disney, and any book that had a horse or unicorn on it! (LOVE that unicorns are back in style for kids!) And I loved them so much, that they are still in storage at my dad's house. I want to get them for my daughter, if they're not moldy or something. My mom hates clutter, but books never seemed to be included in that. And when my mom went back to work after my brother and I got to school, she became one of the town's 2 librarians! I was always at the library!! And she got to bring home the new picture books to try them out on us. Plus school library, book fairs and those book order forms (ugh, they had a name that's completely escaping me at the moment- stupid cold brain!), so yeah, there were always books coming out our ears!
Both of my parents were readers, also my grandparents. I remember a large bookcase in my grandparents' house. My grandfather likes his history and politics, I remember a book on his case called Bay of Pigs. As a kid, I could read those words, but they made absolutely no sense to me- a bay of pigs??? As an adult, I kinda feel some unfinished business that I ought to go find a copy of that book and read it....


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