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message 1: by Teresa, Plan B is in Effect (new)

Teresa Carrigan | 2317 comments Mod
Most years I set my goal on Goodreads at 200 books and end up with about 230 read.

This year I’m falling behind. My daughter the librarian who usually reads well over 300 books a year is finding it almost impossible to finish any book lately. I can still enjoy reading and finish books but it’s become harder for me to find a book that holds my attention, and all too easy to get distracted by other things.

I’ve seen articles saying sales of ebooks are booming and lots of people are reading more than they usually do.

Have your own reading patterns changed this year?


message 2: by Debrac2014 (new)

Debrac2014 | 48 comments I'm reading more ebooks because the libraries are closed! I prefer physical books over ebooks, but my bookshelves can't hold anymore! Due to the closed library, I've accepted a free membership with KindleUnlimited and have gorged myself with Nathan Lowell's books! I'm presently reading The Wizard's Butler.


message 3: by Trike (new)

Trike | 572 comments I’m reading the same amount. As an inveterate introvert and hardcore homebody, I’m loving the lockdown now that we’ve beaten our COVID-19 infections.

I’m not supposed to venture out and no one is allowed to come over; I’ve never been so relaxed.


message 4: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 880 comments Mod
I'm probably reading more because I can't stand watching television any more (though I do). For a while though I couldn't seem to get interested in any fiction so I was reading more nonfiction. Then I got hooked on Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series and have been immersed in that. Not so much into space right now.


message 5: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 293 comments Teresa, I am having the same problem as you. My attention span isn't there. I have read less books than I usually do. It's very strange because in the past few years I actually was trying to reduce my reading and accomplish some other things. I am not accomplishing anything else; I just seem to be lacking in concentration all the way around.


message 6: by Teresa, Plan B is in Effect (new)

Teresa Carrigan | 2317 comments Mod
Lizzie wrote: "Teresa, I am having the same problem as you. My attention span isn't there. I have read less books than I usually do. It's very strange because in the past few years I actually was trying to reduce..."
This is very close to where I am. I am still working full time, but it’s difficult to concentrate on that. I suspect that I’m using up too much of my forced concentration at work.


message 7: by Trike (last edited May 16, 2020 09:02PM) (new)

Trike | 572 comments What do you attribute the lack of concentration ability? General anxiety?

Is it accompanied by insomnia and changes in appetite?


message 8: by L J (last edited May 17, 2020 01:06AM) (new)

L J | 119 comments My reading has changed. I am reading less non-fiction and fewer than usual long books. When I read a long book I take breaks instead of reading straight through. I am doing more reading but mostly genres that tend toward being shorter books. I'm doing author/series binge reading but sometimes become abruptly tired of even favorite authors and genres and have to switch. In addition to re-reading older SF/space opera I am reading and re-reading cozy mystery mostly ones with cat and/or paranormal, romantic suspense, paranormal and SF romance that have some humor, and random genre fiction books I see mentioned that sound entertaining.


message 9: by Teresa, Plan B is in Effect (new)

Teresa Carrigan | 2317 comments Mod
This article is one possible explanation. Title is “Why it’s so hard to read a book right now, explained by a neuroscientist”
https://www.vox.com/culture/2020/5/11...


message 10: by Trike (new)

Trike | 572 comments Teresa wrote: "This article is one possible explanation. Title is “Why it’s so hard to read a book right now, explained by a neuroscientist”
https://www.vox.com/culture/2020/5/11......"


I read that the other day. I was wondering if that aligns with your experience.


message 11: by Teresa, Plan B is in Effect (new)

Teresa Carrigan | 2317 comments Mod
It makes sense anyway. I’ve also noticed that when I get sick my reading preferences change. If I’m running a fever but not sick enough that I can’t read at all, I’m more likely to enjoy Lord Peter Wimsey, cozy mysteries, etc. Usually that can’t hold my attention. Most of time when I’m healthy I bounce between SF and fantasy.

My daughter has it really bad, but then she has a 1st grader and a 3rd grader underfoot that she and her husband are trying to help with virtual schooling. Plus she’s in New Jersey which has been hit really hard. She’s immunocompromised and when they decide to reopen the public libraries she’ll be back at work meeting hundreds of people daily.


message 12: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 293 comments The article doesn't account for my current inability to concentrate on a book, but it explains my whole response to being put on disability. Since 2013, when the surgeries didn't fix my arms, wrists and hands, my short-term memory has been shot, severe insomnia (60 hours or more), lost weight, forget to eat, and so on. I can research it all I want; I can't fix it and the doctors failed. I can't make it better. There is no miracle pill or fix. From this article it appears that anxiety became pathological.

However, through all that, I could still read - I didn't necessary remember the book a week later, but I could still lose myself in books.


message 13: by Teresa, Plan B is in Effect (new)

Teresa Carrigan | 2317 comments Mod
:(


message 14: by Trike (new)

Trike | 572 comments Lizzie wrote: "The article doesn't account for my current inability to concentrate on a book, but it explains my whole response to being put on disability. Since 2013, when the surgeries didn't fix my arms, wrist..."

That’s awful. My uncle and a friend of mine had similar experiences, which seem to have been a bad reaction to general anesthesia. My uncle hasn’t really recovered, but he was in his late 70s when it happened and it was after a heart attack, but my friend had success with a combination of hypnosis and some sort of electrical stimulation of the brain. She was mid-40s at the time (now 59) and apparently the brain stimulation is something they can do from the outside. I’ve heard there are YouTube videos showing how to do it and people experiment on themselves, but that seems kind of risky to me. Better to do it under medical supervision.


message 15: by L J (new)

L J | 119 comments Lizzie wrote: "The article doesn't account for my current inability to concentrate on a book, but it explains my whole response to being put on disability. Since 2013, when the surgeries didn't fix my arms, wrist..."

It's good that you are able to read books. Reading is used to help with short term memory problems due to trauma. I knew someone with short term memory problems who read as part of her rehab therapy. At first she had to re-read even short paragraphs because by the time she got to end she'd forgotten the beginning. It took time but she improved and became able read a whole book without having to re-read parts. Sometimes memory problems persist so then it's a matter of developing ways to cope. Seems like coping is something you taught yourself. Good for you.


message 16: by Melvin (new)

Melvin Patterson (mkpatt) | 30 comments My county libraries are also closed so Hoopladigital has become my new go to app because my county has an extensive ebook/audiobook collection. So before I buy an ebook I always check there first. Saved a ton of money


message 17: by Ally (new)

Ally | 91 comments I so had the same problem during lockdown. I read only 2 books and watched a lot of TV! Now after 2 months of lockdown, it's over (in France). I am in holidays (but can't go further than 100 km from home, so no beach for me ☹) and I finally want to read again. So don't worry it will pass.


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