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Climate Change > What are the most important books on climate change?

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message 1: by J_BlueFlower (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 12 comments What are the most important books on climate change? Both fiction and non-fiction.

I am currently reading The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming

I have been looking at these lists, but very few people are voting on them, so they may not be reliable:
Best Climate Change Books
Consequences of Climate Change
Best Environmental Books

I am more a less interested in all aspects: What is going to happen? What can be done? what is life going to be like on 10, 20, … 50 years?

What book was the most important for you? If you could force a politician to read one, and only one book, which one would it be?


message 2: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1574 comments Mod
Great questions, BlueFlower. We will get to work on that. I need some time to review a bit. The two names that come immediately to my mind are Bill McKibben and Naomi Klein.


message 3: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1574 comments Mod
I recommend

This Changes Everything Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein by Naomi Klein Naomi Klein

Merchants of Doubt How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming by Naomi Oreskes by Naomi Oreskes Naomi Oreskes


message 4: by Jimmy (new)


message 6: by Jimmy (last edited Sep 26, 2019 04:32PM) (new)

Jimmy | 1574 comments Mod
Those are some of the required books to read.

I read all of them. All excellent.


message 7: by Jimmy (new)


message 11: by J_BlueFlower (last edited Sep 28, 2019 06:41AM) (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 12 comments Thank you very much!

Would you read both The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming and Six Degrees? It sounds a bit to me like Six Degrees is almost an older version of Uninhabitale Earth.


message 12: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 5935 comments Mod
J_BlueFlower wrote: "Thank you very much!

Would you read both The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming and Six Degrees? It sounds a bit to me like Six Degrees is almost an older versio..."


Depends how scared you want to be.

I've read Six Degrees and that's plenty scary.


message 15: by Brian (new)

Brian Burt | 426 comments Mod
This is a blast from the past... but I remember what an impact this nonfiction book, written by two of my favorite SF writers (who are also scientists), had on me back in the 90's. Sadly, it's as relevant today as it was almost 30 years ago.

Our Angry Earth A Ticking Ecological Bomb by Isaac Asimov


message 16: by J_BlueFlower (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 12 comments Thank you for all the references. Here are what I have found/read/intend to read myself:

Non-fiction::
The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming. Book-length treatment of the ideas explored in the original 2017-essay “The Uninhabitable Earth“ of what might happen in the near-future due to global warming. (currently reading)

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History: Seems like a must-read for understanding the greater perspetive. (not read yet).

The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable Why is climate change so hard to understand and why is there no climate fiction (cli-fi)?

Fiction:
The Carbon Diaries 2015 by Saci Lloyd. Not very well written, but seems to me to be the best bet on “near future cli-fi” (reading)

The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future by Naomi Oreskes "The year is 2393..." (not read yet)

Area X: The Southern Reach Trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer. Many people label it as climate fiction. Not really in the current climate crisis way, but more of an environmental awareness book. (It is hard to be more specific without possible spoilers). (Read)

The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard. Does not deal with CO2 at all, but yet has some though provoking ideas. (Read)


message 17: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1574 comments Mod
I wouldn't miss out on this one because it tells how the powers that be have crushed reason:

Merchants of Doubt How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming by Naomi Oreskes by Naomi Oreskes


message 18: by J_BlueFlower (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 12 comments Clare wrote: "Depends how scared you want to be.

I've read Six Degrees and that's plenty scary"


I finished The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming. Here is a quote about 2/3 into the book:

"If you have made it this far, you are a brave reader. Any one of these twelve chapters contains, by rights, enough horror to induce a panic attack in even the most optimistic of those considering it. But you are not merely considering it; you are about to embark on living it."

The first 12 chapters are 12 different consequences of warming, where sea level rise is just a single one. There is a lot of different consequences and references I never heard about. Like for instance a new study of rice growing in CO2 rich environment that shows that the protein and vitamin contents goes down. That is actually quite surprising since CO2 enrichment of the greenhouse air is used to increase the yield. But the thing is that the protein content per gram goes down. If rice is the main protein source you cannot compensate for that by just eating more.

I can highly recommend the book specially since it is completely new and up to date (Published February 19th 2019).

If anyone read both The Uninhabitable Earth and Six Degrees, I would like to know is Six Degrees is worth reading also given that The Uninhabitable Earth covers the same material and Six Degrees is 12 years old.


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