,
Jeff VanderMeer

more photos (1)

Jeff VanderMeer’s Followers (12,410)

member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
Ray Nessly
1,604 books | 211 friends

Jason
1,662 books | 1,189 friends

Alex Te...
1,956 books | 3,033 friends

J.L.   ...
2,054 books | 4,732 friends

Egaeus ...
394 books | 192 friends

Steve
573 books | 367 friends

Paul
690 books | 81 friends

Nayad M...
931 books | 2,131 friends

More friends…

Jeff VanderMeer

Goodreads Author


Born
in The United States
Website

Genre

Member Since
May 2009


NYT bestselling writer Jeff VanderMeer has been called “the weird Thoreau” by the New Yorker for his engagement with ecological issues. His most recent novel, the national bestseller Borne, received wide-spread critical acclaim and his prior novels include the Southern Reach trilogy (Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance). Annihilation won the Nebula and Shirley Jackson Awards, has been translated into 35 languages, and was made into a film from Paramount Pictures directed by Alex Garland. His nonfiction has appeared in New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Atlantic, Slate, Salon, and the Washington Post. He has coedited several iconic anthologies with his wife, the Hugo Award winning editor. Other titles include Wonderbook, the worl ...more

To ask Jeff VanderMeer questions, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

Jeff VanderMeer Thank you for the truly great question, Ali. To me, this is the essential theme of our time, and it's not about giving in or checking out. It's about …moreThank you for the truly great question, Ali. To me, this is the essential theme of our time, and it's not about giving in or checking out. It's about adaptation to what's coming. Of course, I'm coming at it from a kind of fantastical point of view. No matter how I deploy science or specific detail about our real world, I'm still somewhere between the real and the metaphorical in these explorations. In part to get the distance to explore modes of thoughts, and in the absence of being able to imagine being truly not-human, to get as close to that as possible without marginalizing that state of being as horrific.

I suppose I don't see it as leaving behind individual consciousness as being in greater harmony and collusion with the contamination we already experience but that is invisible to us, and to also thereby better understand that we do not in fact stick out from our landscape, but are part of it. This is something we've forgotten over the last centuries, and the farther we get away from understanding this, the farther we get from long-term solutions to questions like...What do we contribute to our biosphere? Why do we privilege human-style intelligence to the exclusion of all else? Why do we see as strengths those things that are actually now weaknesses in ourselves as a sustainable species on Earth?

This doesn't even get to the question of being able to see our environment with a fresh eye--so that we no longer think in terms of being stewards or despoilers but some other philosophy altogether. And this in the context, too, of not bringing with us the old "culture creatures" as Schama puts it in his book Landscape and Memory. That we might see with clear vision but also perhaps with a hint of awe just how thoroughly we live on an alien planet that is full of wonders we're only now beginning to understand. And of which we are at times the most mundane.(less)
Jeff VanderMeer My real phobia is cockroaches. Growing up in Fiji, I would sometimes wake up and hear this crackling, shifting sound in my ears. These small cockroach…moreMy real phobia is cockroaches. Growing up in Fiji, I would sometimes wake up and hear this crackling, shifting sound in my ears. These small cockroaches would burrow in there and I'd have to fish them out. So I come by my phobia honestly. Also, I should note that it extends to professional cockroaches, not just amateur ones. We were on a claustrophobic boat trip once in Romania (eventually cut off by the Romanian navy and a man in a dinghy, but that's another story0 and there were rustling boxes under each of the bench seats in the passenger area (which didn't have windows you could open). The translation came back as "professional cockroaches." Boxes and boxes of professional cockroaches, to be used as bait by fishermen. I was as phobic about them as any number of amateur cockroaches. When it comes to cockroaches, I treat all equally. (Except, I really hate the flying ones.)

As for using them in my writing, I did once write a children's story called Erin & the Roach, but it has never been published, and probably shouldn't be published...by anyone.(less)
Average rating: 3.71 · 440,883 ratings · 49,602 reviews · 213 distinct worksSimilar authors
Annihilation

3.74 avg rating — 192,147 ratings — published 2014 — 93 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Authority

3.53 avg rating — 72,637 ratings — published 2014 — 69 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Acceptance

3.62 avg rating — 55,931 ratings — published 2014 — 65 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Borne (Borne, #1)

3.93 avg rating — 31,646 ratings — published 2017 — 57 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Area X: The Southern Reach ...

3.81 avg rating — 7,764 ratings — published 2014 — 26 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
City of Saints and Madmen (...

by
3.86 avg rating — 6,298 ratings — published 2002 — 26 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hummingbird Salamander

3.28 avg rating — 7,234 ratings — published 2021 — 25 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Strange Bird: A Borne S...

4.15 avg rating — 5,704 ratings — published 2017 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Dead Astronauts (Borne, #2)

3.36 avg rating — 6,211 ratings — published 2019 — 18 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Wonderbook: The Illustrated...

by
4.35 avg rating — 3,559 ratings — published 2013 — 13 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jeff VanderMeer…

Welcome to Tallahassee: Where Are the Grown-Ass Adults in Local Politics?

Justin Ghazvini posted this completely untrue screed on his public facebook page. He helped found Grow Tallahassee.

by Jeff VanderMeer

If you were to write a guide to Tallahassee local politics, you might have to divide it into categories like “Responsible Adults,” “Whiny Children,” and “WTF Was That.” In what has been the most acrimonious and negative campaign cycle in the city’s history, there

Read more of this blog post »
5 likes ·   •  1 comment  •  flag
Share on Twitter
Published on August 21, 2022 16:42
Annihilation Authority Acceptance
(4 books)
by
3.67 avg rating — 328,497 ratings

Borne Dead Astronauts
(2 books)
by
3.88 avg rating — 43,565 ratings

City of Saints and Madmen Shriek: An Afterword Finch
(3 books)
by
3.94 avg rating — 12,342 ratings

The Thackery T. Lambshead P...
(2 books)
by
3.66 avg rating — 1,473 ratings

A Peculiar Peril
(2 books)
by
3.24 avg rating — 1,663 ratings

More series by Jeff VanderMeer…

Related News

Need another excuse to treat yourself to a new book this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. To create our...
20 likes · 4 comments
Are you itching to embark on an epic reading adventure? Lucky for you, this season offers some stellar (and interstellar) new books for...
133 likes · 22 comments
Need another excuse to treat yourself to a new book this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. To create our...
41 likes · 7 comments
Annihilation
Jeff VanderMeer is currently reading
by Jeff VanderMeer (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Jeff’s Recent Updates

Jeff VanderMeer wrote a new blog post

Welcome to Tallahassee: Where Are the Grown-Ass Adults in Local Politics?

Justin Ghazvini posted this completely untrue screed on his public facebook page. He helped found Grow Tallahassee.
by Jeff VanderMeer
If you were to w Read more of this blog post »
More of Jeff's books…
Quotes by Jeff VanderMeer  (?)
Quotes are added by the Goodreads community and are not verified by Goodreads. (Learn more)

“Where lies the strangling fruit that came from the hand of the sinner I shall bring forth the seeds of the dead to share with the worms that gather in the darkness and surround the world with the power of their lives while from the dimlit halls of other places forms that never were and never could be writhe for the impatience of the few who never saw what could have been. In the black water with the sun shining at midnight, those fruit shall come ripe and in the darkness of that which is golden shall split open to reveal the revelation of the fatal softness in the earth. The shadows of the abyss are like the petals of a monstrous flower that shall blossom within the skull and expand the mind beyond what any man can bear, but whether it decays under the earth or above on green fields, or out to sea or in the very air, all shall come to revelation, and to revel, in the knowledge of the strangling fruit—and the hand of the sinner shall rejoice, for there is no sin in shadow or in light that the seeds of the dead cannot forgive. And there shall be in the planting in the shadows a grace and a mercy from which shall blossom dark flowers, and their teeth shall devour and sustain and herald the passing of an age. That which dies shall still know life in death for all that decays is not forgotten and reanimated it shall walk the world in the bliss of not-knowing. And then there shall be a fire that knows the naming of you, and in the presence of the strangling fruit, its dark flame shall acquire every part of you that remains.”
Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

“The effect of this cannot be understood without being there. The beauty of it cannot be understood, either, and when you see beauty in desolation it changes something inside you. Desolation tries to colonize you.”
Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

“That's how the madness of the world tries to colonize you: from the outside in, forcing you to live in its reality.”
Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

Polls

Select a book to read now to discuss starting November 1st.

Please vote only for a book you will read (or re-read if you've read it) and return to discuss if it wins. Happy voting!

Borne by Jeff VanderMeer
2017, 336 pages, 3.9 stars
$9.99 Kindle, print from $5.64, at library



"In a ruined, nameless city of the future, a woman named Rachel, who makes her living as a scavenger, finds a creature she names “Borne” entangled in the fur of Mord, a gigantic, despotic bear. Mord once prowled the corridors of the biotech organization known as the Company, which lies at the outskirts of the city, until he was experimented on, grew large, learned to fly and broke free. Driven insane by his torture at the Company, Mord terrorizes the city even as he provides sustenance for scavengers like Rachel.

At first, Borne looks like nothing at all—just a green lump that might be a Company discard. The Company, although severely damaged, is rumoured to still make creatures and send them to distant places that have not yet suffered Collapse.

Borne somehow reminds Rachel of the island nation of her birth, now long lost to rising seas. She feels an attachment she resents; attachments are traps, and in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet when she takes Borne to her subterranean sanctuary, the Balcony Cliffs, Rachel convinces her lover, Wick, not to render Borne down to raw genetic material for the drugs he sells—she cannot break that bond.

Wick is a special kind of supplier, because the drug dealers in the city don’t sell the usual things. They sell tiny creatures that can be swallowed or stuck in the ear, and that release powerful memories of other people’s happier times or pull out forgotten memories from the user’s own mind—or just produce beautiful visions that provide escape from the barren, craterous landscapes of the city.

Against his better judgment, out of affection for Rachel or perhaps some other impulse, Wick respects her decision. Rachel, meanwhile, despite her loyalty to Wick, knows he has kept secrets from her. Searching his apartment, she finds a burnt, unreadable journal titled “Mord,” a cryptic reference to the Magician (a rival drug dealer) and evidence that Wick has planned the layout of the Balcony Cliffs to match the blueprint of the Company building. What is he hiding? Why won’t he tell her about what happened when he worked for the Company?"
 
  6 votes, 35.3%

American War by Omar El Akkad
2017, 384 pages, 3.82 stars
$11.99 Kindle, cheap used print, at library



"An audacious and powerful debut novel: a second American Civil War, a devastating plague, and one family caught deep in the middle a story that asks what might happen if America were to turn its most devastating policies and deadly weapons upon itself.

Sarat Chestnut, born in Louisiana, is only six when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. But even she knows that oil is outlawed, that Louisiana is half underwater, and that unmanned drones fill the sky. When her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she begins to grow up shaped by her particular time and place. But not everyone at Camp Patience is who they claim to be. Eventually Sarat is befriended by a mysterious functionary, under whose influence she is turned into a deadly instrument of war. The decisions that she makes will have tremendous consequences not just for Sarat but for her family and her country, rippling through generations of strangers and kin alike."
 
  4 votes, 23.5%

The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton
1969, 327 pages, 3.88 stars
$9.99 Kindle, cheap used print, at library



"AThe United States government is given a warning by the pre-eminent biophysicists in the country: current sterilization procedures applied to returning space probes may be inadequate to guarantee uncontaminated re-entry to the atmosphere. Two years later, seventeen satellites are sent into the outer fringes of space to collect organisms and dust for study. One of them falls to earth, landing in a desolate area of Arizona. Twelve miles from the landing site, in the town of Piedmont, a shocking discovery is made: the streets are littered with the dead bodies of the town's inhabitants, as if they dropped dead in their tracks."
 
  3 votes, 17.6%

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal
2018, 431 pages, 4.33 stars
$9.99 Kindle, paper from $7.77, *may* be at library (it's fairly new)



"A meteor decimates the U.S. government and paves the way for a climate cataclysm that will eventually render the earth inhospitable to humanity. This looming threat calls for a radically accelerated timeline in the earth’s efforts to colonize space, as well as an unprecedented opportunity for a much larger share of humanity to take part.

One of these new entrants in the space race is Elma York, whose experience as a WASP pilot and mathematician earns her a place in the International Aerospace Coalition’s attempts to put man on the moon. But with so many skilled and experienced women pilots and scientists involved with the program, it doesn’t take long before Elma begins to wonder why they can’t go into space, too—aside from some pesky barriers like thousands of years of history and a host of expectations about the proper place of the fairer sex. And yet, Elma’s drive to become the first Lady Astronaut is so strong that even the most dearly held conventions may not stand a chance."
 
  2 votes, 11.8%

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
1969, 275 pages, 4.07 stars
$6.99 Kindle, cheap used print, at library



"It took Vonnegut more than 20 years to put his Dresden experiences into words. He explained, "there is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre. Everybody is supposed to be dead, to never say anything or want anything ever again." Slaughterhouse Five is a powerful novel incorporating a number of genres. Only those who have fought in wars can say whether it represents the experience well. However, what the novel does do is invite the reader to look at the absurdity of war. Human versus human, hedonist politicians pressing buttons and ordering millions to their deaths all for ideologies many cannot even comprehend. Flicking between the US, 1940's Germany and Tralfamadore, Vonnegut's semi- autobiographical protagonist Billy Pilgrim finds himself very lost. One minute he is being viewed as a specimen in a Tralfamadorian Zoo, the next he is wandering a post-apocalyptic city looking for corpses. Slaughterhouse Five-Or The Children's Crusade A Duty-Dance with Death is a remarkable blend of black humour, irony, the truth and the absurd. The author regards his work a "failure", millions of readers do not. Released the same time bombs were falling on South East Asia, this title caused controversy and awakening. Essential reading for all. So it goes. —Jon Smith"
 
  2 votes, 11.8%

More...

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Fantasy Book Club: This topic has been closed to new comments. What are you reading in March? 72 350 Mar 29, 2009 05:36PM  
Beyond Reality: This topic has been closed to new comments. Nominations for July 24 232 Apr 19, 2009 08:25AM  
Beyond Reality: This topic has been closed to new comments. Welcome to May! 1 56 May 01, 2009 10:10AM  
Beyond Reality: So who are your favorites? 50 722 May 21, 2009 08:24AM  
Beyond Reality: This topic has been closed to new comments. Welcome to June! 1 40 Jun 01, 2009 08:59AM  
SciFi and Fantasy...: What I am also reading in April 40 391 Jun 30, 2009 07:43PM  
Beyond Reality: This topic has been closed to new comments. What are you reading right now? 180 497 Jul 01, 2009 01:34AM  
Challenge: 50 Books: Evan's 50 for 2009 42 677 Sep 08, 2009 11:24AM  
Beyond Reality: This topic has been closed to new comments. Nominations for March! 30 68 Dec 21, 2009 09:06AM  
The Lucid Garden: Welcomes and Whatnot 4 50 Mar 12, 2010 12:04PM  
1218 The Next Best Book Club — 23283 members — last activity 2 hours, 4 min ago
Are you searching for the NEXT best book? Are you willing to kiss all your spare cash goodbye? Are you easily distracted by independent bookshops, bi ...more
1865 SciFi and Fantasy Book Club — 32991 members — last activity 46 minutes ago
Hi there! SFFBC is a welcoming place for readers to share their love of speculative fiction through group reads, buddy reads, challenges, ...more
74958 Book Keeping — 133 members — last activity Mar 18, 2021 12:44PM
Farrar, Straus and Giroux and Sarah Crichton Books / FSG present Book Keeping, a readers' community. Join us for discussions, author chats, and giveaw ...more



Comments (showing 1-4)    post a comment »
dateUp arrow    newest »

message 4: by Sandy

Sandy Parsons WTG Jeff! I loved Annihilation. Couldn't stop reading. I was totally captivated.


Niederberger This image gave me flashbacks to your Southern Reach trilogy (which I DEVOURED in a few short weeks!). Hope you enjoy:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marcoor...


Christine Hatfield Thanks for being my friend


message 1: by Fran

Fran Friel Happy Tuesday, Jeff!


back to top