Reading the 20th Century discussion

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Archive > Group Read -> August 2018 -> Nomination thread (A book set in, or about, the 1900s, won by The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett)

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message 1: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Every month we will discuss a book on a specific era or a theme. This book will be the winner of a group poll. The approximate timings are...


Start of the month - request nominations
6th of the month - publish poll
11th of the month - announce winner

Our next theme is the 1900s (1900-1909) and we will be reading and discussing the winning book in August 2018

If you feel inspired, please nominate a book set in, or about, the 1900s that you would like to read and discuss.

It can be either fiction or non-fiction.

Please supply the title, author, a brief synopsis, and anything else you'd like to mention about the book, and why you think it might make a good book to discuss.

If your nomination wins then please be willing to fully participate in the subsequent discussion.

Happy nominating.


Wedding c1904


message 2: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Some inspiration found on Wikipedia.......


1900

Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad (Poland, England)

Genre fiction

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (USA)

1901

Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann (Germany)
The Inheritors by Joseph Conrad and Ford Madox Ford (England)
Kim by Rudyard Kipling (India, England)
The Purple Cloud by M. P. Shiel (Montserrat, England)
The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells (England)

1902

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Immoralist by André Gide (France)
The Wings of the Dove by Henry James (USA, England)
The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett (England)
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle (Scotland)
Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling


1903

Romance by Joseph Conrad and Ford Madox Ford
The Ambassadors by Henry James
The Pit by Frank Norris (USA)
In Wonderland by Knut Hamsun (Norway)
The Call of the Wild by Jack London (USA)
The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers (England, Ireland)

1904

The Golden Bowl by Henry James
Nostromo by Joseph Conrad
The Napoleon of Notting Hill by G. K. Chesterton (England)
The Food of the Gods by H. G. Wells
The Sea-Wolf by Jack London
Green Mansions by William Henry Hudson (Argentina, England)

1905

Hadrian the Seventh by Frederick Rolfe aka Baron Corvo (England, Italy)
Where Angels Fear to Tread by E. M. Forster (England)
Kipps by H. G. Wells
Songs of Life and Hope by Rubén Darío (Nicaragua)
The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (USA)
The Club of Queer Trades by G. K. Chesterton

1906

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (USA)
The Confusions of Young Törless by Robert Musil (Austria)
Puck of Pook's Hill by Rudyard Kipling
Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens by J. M. Barrie (Scotland)
Time and the Gods by Lord Dunsany (Ireland, England)
White Fang by Jack London

1907

The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
The Longest Journey by E. M. Forster
The Listener and Other Stories by Algernon Blackwood (England) - contains The Willows, one of the first 'cosmic horror' stories
The Hill of Dreams by Arthur Machen (England)
Cautionary Tales for Children by Hilaire Belloc (France, England)

1908

The Man Who Was Thursday by G. K. Chesterton
A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
The Iron Heel by Jack London
Hell by Henri Barbusse (France, Russia)
The Magician by Somerset Maugham (England, France) - based on the author's meeting with Aleister Crowley
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame (England)
Personae by Ezra Pound (USA, England, Italy) - one of the first examples of 'modernist' poetry

1909

Martin Eden by Jack London
Sparrows: the story of an unprotected girl by Horace W C Newte
Tono-Bungay by H. G. Wells
Three Lives by Gertrude Stein (USA, France)


message 3: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
I'm vaguely drawn to more HG Wells - he was pretty prolific in that time period....


Love and Mr Lewisham (1900)
The First Men in the Moon (1901)
The Sea Lady (1902)
The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth (1904)
Kipps (1905)
A Modern Utopia (1905)
In the Days of the Comet (1906)
The War in the Air (1908)
Tono-Bungay (1909)
Ann Veronica (1909)


message 4: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
There's loads more too once you start to investigate.


Over to you.

Happy nominating.


message 5: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5680 comments Mod
Great choice, this month, Nigeyb! I'm really torn between Henry James and Edith Wharton, both of whom I was planning to read/re-read so it would be even better to do it with the group. Will ponder and come back with a proper nomination.


message 6: by Nigeyb (last edited May 30, 2018 12:37PM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Thanks RC. I should mention that all our nomination decisions are a group effort.


Roman Clodia wrote: "I'm really torn between Henry James and Edith Wharton, both of whom I was planning to read/re-read so it would be even better to do it with the group."

I'm sure either would be a popular choice.

In addition to mulling H.G. Wells, I am also considering The Magician by W. Somerset Maugham or maybe even The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers, Childers' only novel, written as propaganda to urge the British government to develop defences against a possible German invasion pre-World War I, or at least mandatory naval service.

So many wonderful sounding books eh?




message 7: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
I would like to nominate Bertie: A Life of Edward VII Bertie A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

SHORTLISTED FOR THE DUFF COOPER PRIZE

Edward VII, who gave his name to the Edwardian era but was always known as Bertie, was fifty-nine when he finally came to power and ushered out the Victorian age. The eldest son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Bertie was bullied by both his parents. Denied any proper responsibilities, the heir to the throne spent his time eating (which earned him the nickname ‘Tum Tum’), pursuing women (which Queen Victoria held to be the reason for Albert’s early demise), gambling, going to house parties and race meetings, and shooting pheasants. His arranged marriage to the stunning Danish princess Alexandra gave him access to the European dynastic network; but his name was linked with many beauties, including Lillie Langtry and Winston Churchill’s mother. This magnificent new biography provides new insight into the playboy prince while painting a vivid portrait of the age in all its excess and eccentricity.

Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

The dates just fit so perfectly, I can't resist it :)


message 8: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Wonderful. Thanks Susan. A splendid suggestion.


message 9: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
And Susan has just reminded me that we might be reading The Magician soon anyway.

#hinthint


message 10: by Val (last edited May 31, 2018 01:28AM) (new)

Val | 1709 comments In this era there was a revolution in transport, first powered flights, more reliable motor cars (and eventually more affordable ones), first lightweight tractors (which could be driven up and down fields) and growth in public omnibus services (there had been a few experimental ones earlier). Unfortunately all the books I have found on the subject are too specialised and nerdy to nominate, but if someone can recommend one...

Instead I will nominate a book by the eccentric and inventive Boer War hero, Robert Baden-Powell Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship, which pioneered a different type of revolution, mixing up the social classes and encouraging boys (and later girls) to think for themselves.


message 11: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5680 comments Mod
On reflection I think James' late novels might be too much of an acquired taste, and Wharton too well known... so I'll nominate Claudine at School, the first of Colette's Claudine quartet (The Claudine Novels).

First published in 1900, this is surprisingly modern in terms of 'girl power' and sexuality - and might be interesting in relation to the suffragette reading we did. Plus Colette is a marvellous writer and Claudine one of her best creations, very witty.

The books have all been re-issued for Kindle by Vintage: www.amazon.co.uk/Claudine-At-School-V...

Btw, if anyone is interested in buddy reads for Henry James or Edith Wharton, I'm in!


message 12: by Val (new)

Val | 1709 comments Henry James: maybe
Edith Wharton: probably not


message 13: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Roman Clodia wrote: "I'll nominate Claudine at School, the first of Colette's Claudine quartet (The Claudine Novels."


Thanks RC. Sound reasoning behind your decision making.

I've only read one book by Colette which was not to my taste at all, so would be good to have a reason to give her a second chance.


Val wrote: "I will nominate a book by the eccentric and inventive Boer War hero, Robert Baden-Powell Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship, which pioneered a different type of revolution, mixing up the social classes and encouraging boys (and later girls) to think for themselves"

Inspired. Thanks Val.


message 14: by Nigeyb (last edited May 31, 2018 09:35AM) (new)


message 15: by Lia (new)

Lia Henry/ William James, Thomas Mann, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Ezra Pound ... it's a tough one!

I personally really like late Henry James, but since the consensus is that it's an "acquired taste," I'm going to pick a "safe" one that most people have probably read in high school. I want to reread it because I've been reading about Conrad lately: I nominate Heart of Darkness.


message 16: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5680 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "I've only read one book by Colette which was not to my taste at all, so would be good to have a reason to give her a second chance."

Would that be Chéri and the Last of Chéri, by any chance, Nigeyb? Just that I know other people who really didn't like those.

The Claudine books are different: more dynamic and with a witty, mischevious protagonist who is as adorable as Gigi but treated with far greater depth given the scope of the quartet.


message 17: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Roman Clodia wrote: "Would that be Chéri and the Last of Chéri, by any chance, Nigeyb? Just that I know other people who really didn't like those. "

How astute you are Roman Clodia.

It was Chéri. I've just found my review too....

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

I'm reassured to discover that the Claudine books are different


message 18: by Nigeyb (last edited May 31, 2018 01:09PM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Thanks Lia - I've added your nomination to the list


NOMINATIONS SO FAR:

LIA: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
ROMAN CLODIA: Claudine at School by Colette
VAL: Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship by Robert Baden-Powell
SUSAN: Bertie: A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley


message 19: by Nigeyb (last edited May 31, 2018 01:24PM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
After extensive mulling and chin stoking I have decided to go with...


The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers

I just found this enticing review on The Guardian website which concludes that it's...

..."a gripping book in its own right; even more fascinating in the context of the life and times of its author."

When Charles Carruthers accepts an invitation for a yachting and duck-shooting trip to the Frisian Islands from Arthur Davies, an old chum from his Oxford days, he has no idea their holiday will become a daredevil investigation into a German plot to invade Britain.

Out of context, the story of Erskine Childers's The Riddle of the Sands sounds like a bog standard thriller, but that's because so many books are pale echoes of this exceptional novel.

Published in 1903, it predicted the threat of war with Germany and was so prescient in its identification of the British coast's defensive weaknesses that it influenced the siting of new naval bases.

It is also credited as an inspiration to everyone from John Buchan to Ken Follett. The writing is gripping and it's a marvel that Childers manages to make the minutiae of sailing and navigation so engrossing.

Although Riddle was an instant bestseller, Childers never wrote another novel, concentrating instead on military strategy manuals before entering politics and eventually becoming a fervent Irish nationalist.

Carruthers and Davies are wonderful characters, the former a fop from the Foreign Office, the latter an eccentric sailing fanatic.

Davies is based on the author and reading about his courageous struggles for king and country is particularly poignant when you know that Childers was considered a traitor by the British government at the time of his death. He was executed by a firing squad in 1922, by order of the Irish Free State.

A gripping book in its own right; even more fascinating in the context of the life and times of its author.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/200...






NOMINATIONS SO FAR:

NIGEYB: The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers
LIA: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
ROMAN CLODIA: Claudine at School by Colette
VAL: Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship by Robert Baden-Powell
SUSAN: Bertie: A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley


message 20: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia | 5680 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "It was Chéri. I've just found my review too...."

Ha, you *really* didn't like it! Still, we've got some great choices already - I don't think I've ever read The Riddle of the Sands.


message 21: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1290 comments I actually have Riddle of the Sands and Heart of Darkness.


message 22: by Bronwyn (new)

Bronwyn (nzfriend) | 384 comments Susan wrote: "I would like to nominate Bertie: A Life of Edward VII Bertie A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

SHORTLISTED FOR THE DUFF COOPER PRIZE

Edward VII..."


This one is called The Heir Apparent: A Life of Edward VII, the Playboy Prince over here.


I really like this theme. I'll have to think of something!


message 23: by Lia (new)

Lia Jan C wrote: "I actually have Riddle of the Sands and Heart of Darkness."

Me too! I’ve been giving away my paper books as I shift towards ebooks. Heart of Darkness is one of the few printed books I kept. (Though it might be because it’s falling apart and too unpresentable to rehome.)


message 24: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1290 comments Bronwyn wrote: "Susan wrote: "I would like to nominate Bertie: A Life of Edward VII Bertie A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

SHORTLISTED FOR THE DUFF COOPER PRI..."


Thanks. It looks like I have that one, too.


message 25: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
I haven't read any of the suggestions - including my own - which makes me happy. I have long meant to try Conrad, in particular, and never got round to him. When I read Clive James bookish memoir, he wrote about Conrad a lot and, as I liked most of the other authors he wrote about, he is definitely on my radar.


message 26: by Val (new)

Val | 1709 comments Heart of Darkness is a problematic work, more so than others by Conrad. (view spoiler)
Clive James is not the only fan; when Salman Rushdie needed a pseudonym, he used 'Joseph Anton' from Conrad and Chekhov.


message 27: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
Yes, I read that, Val. I enjoyed Rushdie's last novel a lot. The Golden House


message 28: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
The Conrad is indeed a bit challenging but I still enjoyed it.


message 29: by Bronwyn (new)

Bronwyn (nzfriend) | 384 comments Jan C wrote: "Bronwyn wrote: "Susan wrote: "I would like to nominate Bertie: A Life of Edward VII Bertie A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

SHORTLISTED FOR THE..."


You're welcome! I thought it looked familiar when it popped up, but couldn't find that title on my shelf, but figured it out. :)


I think I'm going to nominate The Making of a Marchioness, Part I and II. I've been wanting to read it for a while, and have seen an adaptation, and so this seems like a good chance to possibly finally get to it! :)


message 30: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) I nominate Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow

Published in 1975, Wikipedia says this:

Ragtime is a novel by E. L. Doctorow, published in 1975. This work of historical fiction is mainly set in the New York City area from 1902 until 1912, with brief scenes towards the end describing the United States' entry into World War I in 1917.

In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Ragtime number 86 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. TIME magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-Language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1]

The novel is unusual for the irreverent way that historical figures and fictional characters are woven into the narrative, making for surprising connections and linking different events and trains of thought about fame and success, on the one hand, and poverty and racism on the other. Harry Houdini plays a prominent yet incidental part, reflecting on success and mortality. Arch-capitalist financier J.P. Morgan, pursuing his complex delusions of grandeur, is delivered a plainly spoken comeuppance from down-to-earth Henry Ford. Socialite Evelyn Nesbit becomes involved with the slum family and is aided by the anarchist agitator Emma Goldman. The black moderate politician Booker T. Washington tries to negotiate with Coalhouse Walker, without success.

Other historical characters mentioned include the polar explorer Robert Peary and his black assistant Matthew Henson, the architect Stanford White, Nesbit's mentally unbalanced husband Harry Kendall Thaw (who murdered White for allegedly sexually assaulting Nesbit when she was 15), Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, Countess Sophie Chotek, Sigmund Freud, who rides the Tunnel of Love at Coney Island with Carl Jung, Theodore Dreiser, Jacob Riis, and the Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata. Several real-life New York City officials also appear in the book: Manhattan District Attorney Charles S. Whitman and Police Commissioner Rhinelander Waldo.

The novel was a nominee for the Nebula Award for Best Novel and won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction in 1975, and the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award in 1976.[4]


message 31: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
Ooh, good nomination, Kirsten!


message 32: by Nigeyb (last edited Jun 01, 2018 08:30AM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Thanks Kirsten - another classic.


What an amazing array of nominations so far. We really could have a wonderful debate about each and everyone of them.

Bravo RTTC.

What a splendid group of people we have here.


NOMINATIONS SO FAR:

KIRSTEN: Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow
NIGEYB: The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers
LIA: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
ROMAN CLODIA: Claudine at School by Colette
VAL: Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship by Robert Baden-Powell
SUSAN: Bertie: A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley




message 33: by Bronwyn (new)

Bronwyn (nzfriend) | 384 comments Sorry, I forgot to include a synopsis.

The Making of a Marchioness, Part I and II

"First published in 1901 as The Making of a Marchioness followed by its sequel The Methods of Lady Walderhurst, the two novels were combined into Emily Fox-Seton who is the two works' primary character. The story follows thirty-something Emily who lives alone, humbly and happily, in a tiny apartment and on a meager income. She is the one that everyone counts on but no one goes out of their way to accommodate. Her fortune changes, however, and the second half chronicles her adaptation to her new life and the dangers that arise from those who stand to lose most from her new circumstances."


message 34: by Nigeyb (last edited Jun 01, 2018 08:56AM) (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Thanks Bronwyn. Nearly missed your nomination. Sounds fab. Anything published by Persephone is pretty much synonymous with good writing.


NOMINATIONS SO FAR:

BRONWYN: The Making of a Marchioness, Part I and II by Frances Hodgson Burnett
KIRSTEN: Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow
NIGEYB: The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers
LIA: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
ROMAN CLODIA: Claudine at School by Colette
VAL: Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship by Robert Baden-Powell
SUSAN: Bertie: A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley




message 35: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Is anyone else planning to nominate a book?


message 36: by Judy (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4673 comments Mod
Yes, I'm just considering what to go for...


message 37: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
Some great choices.


message 38: by Val (new)

Val | 1709 comments If you were thinking of opening the poll early Nigey, just a reminder that it has been half-term this last week, so some members might be away on holiday.


message 39: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Good point Val. Thanks.


I'll leave it until next week and, of course, for Judy's nomination


message 40: by Judy (last edited Jun 02, 2018 08:33AM) (new)

Judy (wwwgoodreadscomprofilejudyg) | 4673 comments Mod
I'll admit I've found myself totally spoilt for choice - whether to go for:

...one of E.M. Forster's three novels published in this period
...one of the H.G. Wells books which Nigeyb mentioned earlier
....The famous novel The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton or her lesser-known book The Fruit of the Tree, which looks interesting too
...Historical novel The House of Orphans by the late Helen Dunmore, which is set in Finland in 1901 - I remember loving this one

But in the end I've decided to nominate:
The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett, written in 1902. The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett

I had a look at the start of this and it looks very funny - Here is the Goodreads blurb:

Nella, daughter of millionaire Theodore Racksole, orders a dinner of steak and beer at the exclusive Grand Babylon Hotel in London. Her order is refused, so Theodore promptly buys the chef, the kitchen and the whole hotel. But when hotel staff begin to vanish and a German prince goes missing, Nella discovers that murder, blackmail and kidnapping are also on the menu. A rollicking murder mystery from one of the finest writers of the last century.

And here is a great Goodreads review, which made me really want to read it:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

If you don't want to read the main part of the review before reading the book, you might still enjoy a few of the Wilde/Wodehouse style quotes at the end!


message 41: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
Another great nomination! Spoilt for choice...


message 42: by Story (new)

Story (storyheart) The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett sound wonderful. Great choice, Judy!


message 43: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 38 comments So many great sounding choices! And they're all readily available to American readers, which isn't always the case. Yay!


message 45: by Susan (new)

Susan | 10624 comments Mod
Double hurrah, Barbara! Quite agree - great choices.


message 46: by Val (new)

Val | 1709 comments Barbara wrote: "So many great sounding choices! And they're all readily available to American readers, which isn't always the case. Yay!"
Good


message 47: by Kathy (last edited Jun 02, 2018 02:47PM) (new)

Kathy  | 9 comments Kirsten wrote: "I nominate Ragtime by [author:E.L. Doctorow|12584."

I really enjoyed this book. Great selections not sure which to chose!


message 48: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1290 comments I've been looking. The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux. Serialized in 1907, published in 1908.


message 49: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb | 10369 comments Mod
Thanks Jan - The Mystery of the Yellow Room sounds intriguing...


The young lady had just retired to her room when sounds of a struggle ensue, and cries of "Murder!" and revolver shots ring out. When her locked door is finally broken down by her father and a servant, they find the woman on the floor, badly hurt and bleeding. No one else is in the room. There is no other exit except through a barred window. How did the attacker escape?

First published in 1907, this intriguing and baffling tale is a classic of early 20th-century detective fiction. At the heart of the novel is a perplexing mystery: How could a crime take place in a locked room which shows no sign of being entered? Nearly a century after its initial publication, Leroux's landmark tale of foul play, deception, and unbridled ambition remains a blueprint for the detective novel genre.

Written by the immortal author of The Phantom of the Opera, this atmospheric thriller is still a favorite of whodunit fans everywhere.

"The finest locked room tale ever written." — John Dickson Carr, author of The Hollow Man.


NOMINATIONS SO FAR:

JAN: The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux
JUDY: The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett
BRONWYN: The Making of a Marchioness, Part I and II by Frances Hodgson Burnett
KIRSTEN: Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow
NIGEYB: The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers
LIA: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
ROMAN CLODIA: Claudine at School by Colette
VAL: Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship by Robert Baden-Powell
SUSAN: Bertie: A Life of Edward VII by Jane Ridley




message 50: by Val (new)

Val | 1709 comments Quite a variety of books to choose between in that list.


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