The Book Vipers discussion

56 views
Book Chat > What are you reading in 2018?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 103 (103 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3

message 1: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Tell us about the books that you are reading throughout the year here. To start off I am reading The Diary of a Bookseller and The Inner Life of Animals: Surprising Observations of a Hidden World


message 2: by Nancy (new)

Nancy I just started Les Misérables : Tome I for a chapter-a-day readalong and Revolutionary Ride: On the Road in Search of the Real Iran for #WorldFromMyArmchair challenge 2018!


message 3: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I'm racing to finish I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings for book group on Saturday. And I'm also reading Tales of the Jazz Age, and The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists, all started in 2017


message 5: by Joy (new)

Joy Stephenson (joyfrankie) | 463 comments I’ve just started The True Deceiver and it feels very familiar so I suppose I’ve read it before. However I can’t remember what happens so I’ll read on.


message 6: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I'm going to start In Cold Blood by Truman Capote next, despite the fact that I'll be starting my next book group book tomorrow after the meet and I already have The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists and Tales of the Jazz Age on the go. I do this every January...book fever has peaked!


message 7: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
In Cold Blood is well worth reading. Bear in mind it is a fictionalised account of the horrific events though


message 8: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments So, I haven't started In Cold Blood yet, because next month's book for my book group is The Luminaries...which is huge! I thought we'd put it in for March! So I've started that instead and planned out how many pages per day I need to read. It's surprisingly readable; I was expecting not to like it from the outset after I read the blurb, but so far so good.


message 9: by Patricia (new)

Patricia | 199 comments Toyah wrote: "So, I haven't started In Cold Blood yet, because next month's book for my book group is The Luminaries...which is huge! I thought we'd put it in for March! So I've started that instead and planned ..."

I read In Cold Blood aloud to my husband about 35 years ago. We lived out in the country with no TV or radio. I still remember so many details of the book. Now I think that was a terrible choice for folks living out in the middle of nowhere!!
Read the Luminaries with this group. I thought it was very interesting which made its length less of an issue. But I also remember having to look back and figure out who was whom and who did what! Happy reading!


message 10: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments Patricia...haha I'm not sure I'd have the nerve to read In Cold Blood in those circumstances. I'm only 40 pages into The Luminaries and already confusing names so it doesn't bode well...I'm terrible with names


message 11: by Ruby (new)

Ruby | 19 comments I am currently reading China Dolls by Lisa See. It is set in the 1940s and is a historical fiction of the Asian American experience. Pretty good read so far.


message 12: by Nancy (new)

Nancy I survived the introduction and preface (in French), whew! (pg 21) Psychanalyse de Victor Hugo (IMAGO


message 13: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (mrswhams) | 730 comments Mod
On to The Good People for our monthly read. So far, so wretched!


message 15: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I'm 164 pages into The Luminaries and pleasantly surprised! It's really not what I was expecting, but it's pretty readable! Still confused over who's who, but the story has dragged me in nevertheless


message 16: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Today starting Towards Mellbreak
Book is on shortlist E. Stanford Travel Writing Award for 'Sense of Place" (Hayes &Jarvis Fiction).
...nice pastoral tone, hardworking country folk...fells, sheep, longing to start family (Harold) and memories of deceased family.



message 17: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments Nancy wrote: "I just started Les Misérables : Tome I for a chapter-a-day readalong and Revolutionary Ride: On the Road in Search of the Real Iran for #WorldFromMyArmchair challenge..."

Les Misérables is my favourite book x


message 18: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Jazzy wrote: "Nancy wrote: "I just started Les Misérables : Tome I for a chapter-a-day readalong and Revolutionary Ride: On the Road in Search of the Real Iran for #WorldFromMyArmc..."

Reading at a slow pace...enjoying every word!


message 19: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Just started the last book for my bookbuster challenge, Nature's Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick by Jenny Uglow


message 20: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Just started A Wizard of Earthsea in rememberance of Ursula Le Guin (1929-2018)


message 21: by Ruby (new)

Ruby | 19 comments Just started Andrew Pham's Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage Through the Landscape and Memory of Vietnam for a class here at UC Riverside.


message 22: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
That looks really good Ruby. One Jason might like too


message 23: by Patricia (new)

Patricia | 199 comments I just finished The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. It was recommended or on someone's reading list or talked about on Book Vipers. Thank you to whomever brought it to my attention! I enjoyed slowing down to a snail's pace, at least while I was reading, and examining life. I will better appreciate the snails (and maybe the slugs) that I encounter.


message 24: by Pamela (new)

Pamela (bibliohound) | 358 comments Now reading Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey, really enjoying it. It gives a great sense of how eccentric De Quincey was, and plenty about the other literary figures he met like Coleridge and Wordsworth.


message 25: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Patricia wrote: "I just finished The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. It was recommended or on someone's reading list or talked about on Book Vipers. Thank you to whomever brought it to my attention! I ..."

Couldn't see who recommended it, Patricia. Though it was first mentioned about a year ago.
Most of the way through Eastern Horizons: Hitchhiking the Silk Road at the moment


message 26: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I'm on course to finish The Luminaries before my book group on Saturday. 700 pages in 3 weeks...not bad for a book I thought I was going to hate!


message 27: by Pat (new)

Pat Morris-jones | 1369 comments I loved it. Hope you did too.


message 28: by Joy (new)

Joy Stephenson (joyfrankie) | 463 comments I’m reading Death and Mr. Pickwick. I’m 120 pages in and don’t know what to make of it -it is so meandering with no apparent shape. However I’m enjoying the atmosphere and characters so I’ll keep going for a bit longer.
I’ve never read The Pickwick Papers ( not a Dickens fan) but I’ve heard that also rambles so perhaps this one is intentionally in the same style.


message 29: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Just started A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway my first Hemingway novel - the prose took a little getting used to initially but really enjoying it so far. It’s also the borrowed book for the magic square challenge.


message 30: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
I have never read anything by Hemmingway yet. Looking forward to your final thoughts on it Wendy


message 31: by Mike (new)

Mike Robbins (mikerobbins) | 56 comments Wendy wrote: "Just started A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway my first Hemingway novel - the prose took a little getting used to initially but really enjoying it so far. It’s also..."

I really liked A Farewell to Arms. I hope you enjoy it.

I always knew the book had its origins in Hemingway's time as a Red Cross ambulance driver, but was intrigued to find out recently that his fellow-drivers included John Dos Passos, Walt Disney and Ray Kroc, the father of Macdonalds.


message 32: by Mike (new)

Mike Robbins (mikerobbins) | 56 comments Have just read Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House and am awaiting my copy of Hillary Clinton's What Happened. In between, am enjoying A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal.

I have also just read, and been bowled over by, this: Two Under the Indian Sun


message 33: by Becky (new)

Becky | 161 comments What did you think of Fire and Fury?


message 34: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments Paul wrote: "I have never read anything by Hemmingway yet. Looking forward to your final thoughts on it Wendy"

This surprises me! How did you survive an education without reading Hemingway whether you chose to or not? You simply must now though.


message 35: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments I'm reading The Spy Who Came In from the Cold and I love it.


message 36: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Jazzy wrote: "I'm reading The Spy Who Came In from the Cold and I love it."

It is a brutal book too, but so good.


message 37: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (mrswhams) | 730 comments Mod
My Name Is Lucy Barton for my book club read. So far, fairly meh, after the drama of The Good People, but perhaps it'll get better, and it is at least short.


message 38: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I finished The Luminaries tonight, so I've read a bit more of Tales of the Jazz Age, and I've just bought Gorky Park to start this weekend for February's book group read. I want to find time for so many others too!


message 39: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments Tales of the Jazz Age is very good, Toyah, and Paul I really love this book. I'll be sad to see it end!


message 40: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Jazzy wrote: "This surprises me! How did you survive an education without reading Hemingway whether you chose to or not? You simply must now though...."

We were forced to read other stuff... What would you recommend?


message 41: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments Here Paul x

https://theteacherscrate.files.wordpr...

I like The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, For Whom The Bell Tolls, Farewell to Arms... x


message 42: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5459 comments Mod
Thank you Jazzy


message 43: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I've just finished Tales of the Jazz Age on kindle, so now I'm reading a real book to give my eyes a rest; How Much Land Does a Man Need by Tolstoy.


message 44: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments Paul wrote: "Thank you Jazzy" My pleasure, Treasure.

The Old Man & The Sea
https://la.utexas.edu/users/jmciver/H...

The Sun Also Rises
https://gutenberg.ca/ebooks/hemingway...

For Whom The Bell Tolls
http://kkoworld.com/kitablar/ernest_h...

A Farewell To Arms
https://libcom.org/files/farewelltoar...

Toyah, I loved Tales of the Jazz Age! I used to charge my nook and kindle and read them all the time, but they are disused and forgotten as now it's mostly paperbacks thrust in the pocket of my tweed coat, and a few hardbacks as well.


message 45: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Just started Kim by Rudyard Kipling have to say I'm finding it quite hard work so far!

Also I am reading Preludes & Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman love Gaiman but this is my first graphic novel and although I am enjoying it, it does feel a bit odd to be looking at pictures.


message 46: by Toyah (new)

Toyah (rockabillybibiliophile) | 275 comments I've just finished How Much Land Does a Man Need? by Tolstoy, and I'm still on Gorky Park by Martin Cruz Smith, so for some light relief I've just started Mort by Terry Pratchett.


message 47: by Jo (new)

Jo Weston (joster) | 1697 comments Mod
I am reading The Dry and listening to The Confession


message 50: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 27, 2018 01:38PM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 274 comments I expect to finish The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test - Tom Wolfe today as there less than 30 pages left. I have read a lot of beat generation books so seeing all these authors and real-life characters making their appearance in this book whilst working on books of their own is really fascinating! Amongst them are Ken Kesey, Neal Cassady, Hunter S. Thompson, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary, Larry McMurtry, Ken Babbs, Carolyn Garcia, Lee Quarnstrom, Stewart Brand, Paul Foster, Del Close, Wavy Gravy, Ed McClanahan, Gurney Norman, Paul Krassner, Robert Stone, and all the band of Merry Pranksters on and off the bus FURTHUR and experimenting with LSD in the Acid Tests during a time when it wasn't illegal in California, and Kesey in trouble with the law because marijuana was.


« previous 1 3
back to top