The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

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Miscellaneous Archives > What books do you like to reread?

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message 1: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
There are some books that I consider "keepers", books that I know I am going to read more than once.

This is the place to share books you have read more than once, and books you are planning to reread as well.


message 2: by Rosemarie, Moderator (last edited Dec 30, 2017 02:43PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
I have read the Lord of the Rings trilogy at least three times, with intervals of more than years.
I first read it in university when "everybody" was reading it, back in the early 70s.
Another popular book was Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein. I am almost afraid to reread it, in case I am disappointed.


message 3: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Any book worth reading is worth rereading.

I spend at least half my reading time on rereading. Right now I'm rereading Trollope The Duke's Children and Phineas
Finn, Moby Dick, Pickwick Papers and The Mayor of Casterbridge.


message 4: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Another popular book was Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein. I am almost afraid to reread it, in case I am disappointed.."

Like you, I grok that it might disappoint on rereading.


message 5: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
I read most of Dostoevsky's major novels twice since there is so much depth to his work. I have also read Anna Karenina more than once.


message 6: by Robin P, Moderator (last edited Dec 30, 2017 05:51PM) (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
I have reread the Musketeer series by Dumas several times. I have read all of Jane Austen multiple times, except Mansfield Park, which is so different from the others. Maybe I should try it again. I have read A Christmas Carol many times and some other Dickens 2-3 times. Usually it is because a book group is reading it that I reread.

When I was young (high school and college), I read Lord of the Rings 3 times. There was really nothing else like it at the time.

I think I posted on another thread that it's been so long since I read some books that it is like reading a new book when I go back to it. That is a great thing!


message 7: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments Like Robin, I reread Jane Austen a lot (and have warmed to Mansfield Park as I aged—I really like its symmetries). But most of my rereading is in lighter fiction—classic mystery writers such as Margery Allingham, Josephine Tey, and Michael Innes; Georgette Heyer when I really need to hide from life; and even some children’s books. Currently rereading Middlemarch.


message 8: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (francesab) | 1870 comments Mod
I've also reread most of Jane Austen multiple times, however for me my least favourite is Emma, and even on rereading with the group a while back my opinion wasn't changed!

i'm also rereading some classic mysteries at the moment.

I read the Harry Potter series at least twice each book (my daughter has read each book 6 times now!).


message 9: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
I have been rereading the Agatha Christies mysteries whenever I need a reading treat.
I have read the Narnia books numerous times as well.


message 10: by Juliet (new)

Juliet Valcourt (julietvalcourt) | 5 comments I always re-read books that I own. The ones I revisit the most are Jane Austen novels - except for Emma because I am not fond of the characters.


message 11: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
I read Emma for the first time after I graduated from university and the second time with this group as a monthly read. I almost didn't read because I didn't like the characters that much either.
I am glad I read it with the group since it helped me focus on her writing. Jane Austen could make wicked little comments sometimes, in a delightful way.


message 12: by Phrodrick (new)

Phrodrick My most re read book is Catch-22 Not sure I know the total count but at least 4 reads back to back
Next has to be War and Peace at least four reads

I recently reread the Space Trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet / Perelandra / That Hideous Strength only to realize that in the first read I had not understood it in any way. Rather like going to a farm and buying a barn and never having a clue that there might be animals in it.

On the lighter side I have read all of the Hornblower books at least twice and same for the Aubry Maturin O'Brian books at least twice and at least once more on CD's

Th George Smiley Books likewise at least twice, including lessor ones like A Murder of Quality

I think it is time to warn: Don't get me started

Happy New Year to all


message 13: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
I reread some but usually due to it being a group book. I feel I have too much ground yet to cover and not enough life left. Even those retreads are now being carefully chosen.


message 14: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments Wow, Phrodrick, four times through War and Peace? I wonder you have time to read anything else!


message 15: by Phrodrick (new)

Phrodrick Abigail wrote: "Wow, Phrodrick, four times through War and Peace? I wonder you have time to read anything else!"

A dubious benefit of being ummm shall we say
of a certain age


message 16: by Juliet (new)

Juliet Valcourt (julietvalcourt) | 5 comments Rosemarie, I first read Emma in a university class and oddly enough, I liked it then. It was when I read it again years later that I lost all tolerance for not only Emma, but Mr Knightley too. This happened to me with another book (Dorian Gray) which I also read in college, so I can only assume that I changed in those years. That’s why it’s interesting to revisit books because you never know how you will react to it!

I look upon Emma as Jane’s most cutting commentary on society. It’s great in that way, but the characters are just so unpleasant.


message 17: by Robin P, Moderator (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
Phrodrick wrote: "My most re read book is Catch-22 Not sure I know the total count but at least 4 reads back to back
Next has to be War and Peace at least four reads

I recently reread the [..."


I loved the Aubrey/Maturin books on audio read by Patrick Tull. They are the only audiobooks my husband enjoyed as much as I did.


message 18: by Renee (new)

Renee M | 751 comments Oh yeah! The Aubrey-Maturin books are divine! I'm close to the end and dragging my feet because I don't want my days with Jack and Stephen to be over.


message 19: by Phrodrick (new)

Phrodrick I wonder how much people know about the real Patrick O'Brian?
Like that was not his real name, he was not Irish and never went to sea.
During WW II he won away one of the Tolstoy Family from a life of a well to do diplomat into his house where he was an impecunious struggling writer.

He also wrote and published children's stories starting when he was still a child.


Of the Two Biographies about him, (That I know of) The step son wrote Patrick O'Brian: The Making of the Novelist, 1914-1949
Was written by his step son Nickolai Tolstoy. It is incomplete but makes it clear that the boy mostly enjoyed life with his step-father.


message 20: by Patrick (new)

Patrick I am trying to re-read many books that I read at university in the 1970s. I bring a lot more to them now!


message 21: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments Who was it who said you can never read the same book twice, because you’re always a different person when you return to it?


message 22: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Whoever said that was correct!


message 23: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
Patrick, I have been doing the same thing--reading books from university, sometimes rereading them as well.


message 24: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
I’m especially enjoying reading A Room with a View. Saw the movie on the 80s so got the book and read it. Loved the book. But this time - I’ve been to Florence and fell in love with the city so it’s a totally different experience.


message 25: by Linda2 (last edited Apr 26, 2018 12:18AM) (new)

Linda2 | 3743 comments A Room with a View. The Great Gatsby. Jane Eyre. Brideshead Revisited. Far from the Madding Crowd.


message 26: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments I am currently reading Louise Penny’s mystery series featuring Armand Gamache and can already tell they will be rereads for me. So much richness of human wisdom in them.


message 27: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Abigail wrote: "I am currently reading Louise Penny’s mystery series featuring Armand Gamache and can already tell they will be rereads for me. So much richness of human wisdom in them."

I’ve read quite a few of them. They are so enjoyable....and the food 😀


message 28: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments Well, I worked for Bon Appétit magazine for ten years so I’m a bit jaded about the food. But I love the snappy dialogue!


message 29: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (francesab) | 1870 comments Mod
I love that series as well!


message 30: by Brian (new)

Brian Reynolds | 728 comments Rochelle wrote: "A Room with a View. The Great Gatsby. Jane Eyre. Brideshead Revisited. Far from the Madding Crowd."

I have been re-reading Thomas Hardy's big 5: Return of the Native, Far From the Madding Crowd, Tess, Jude and The Mayor of Casterbridge. While FFTMC is not my favorite, I can see why it may be the best for a re-read - it is the only one of the five that ends happily. Of course, there is still a sufficient dose of good old Hardy tragedy on the way there.


message 31: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "Rochelle wrote: "A Room with a View. The Great Gatsby. Jane Eyre. Brideshead Revisited. Far from the Madding Crowd."

I have been re-reading Thomas Hardy's big 5: Return of the Native, Far From the..."


I love Hardy. Haven’t read him in a while. Maybe it’s time.


message 32: by John (new)

John (kiwiinhove) | 2 comments I have reread Silas Marner many times. I also reread Agatha Christie and am now beginning to reread others classics.


message 33: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2892 comments Mod
I am in the process of rereading some of Agatha Christie's works, since I read all over 30 years ago. I generally don't remember the ending, but even if I do, they are fun.
I have started re-reading Dune, after first reading it in 70s. I loved it then. Now I wonder.....?


message 34: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
John wrote: "I have reread Silas Marner many times. I also reread Agatha Christie and am now beginning to reread others classics."

Last year I read all the Miss Matple mysteries. Such fun to revisit them.


message 35: by David (new)

David (dklemons) I've re-read much of "The Bible"; Homer's "Odysseus" and "The Iliad". Several of the ancient Greek plays. Kazantzakis' "Zorba the Greek". Steinbeck's "Tortilla Flat". Trollope's "Barchester Chronicles" and the "Palliser" series. Sloan Wilson's "Ice Brothers" and "Man in the Gray Flannel Suit I & II. "Passage to India" by E.M. Forster. Many of Shakespeare's plays and his poetry. Several of Joseph Conrad's works. While it's not literature as such, I've re-read "Guns, Germs and Steel" by Jared Diamond. Jane Austen--all her books except "Northanger Abbey"."The Five Pillars of Wisdom" by T.E. Lawrence. "Tom Sawyer"--Mark Twain. "Blind Owl" by Sadegh Hedayat. Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas. "Lucky Jim" by Kingsley Amis. And so on.


message 36: by David (new)

David (dklemons) I will be adding other re-reads as I read them and remember them.


message 37: by Susan (new)

Susan Zinner | 4 comments Brian wrote: "Rochelle wrote: "A Room with a View. The Great Gatsby. Jane Eyre. Brideshead Revisited. Far from the Madding Crowd."

I have been re-reading Thomas Hardy's big 5: Return of the Native, Far From the..."


I read "The Mayor of Casterbridge" for the first time a few years ago as an adult--shocking story to me (selling your wife and child!), but I loved it. It's still my favorite Hardy (have read most, but not all of Hardy).


message 38: by Robin P, Moderator (last edited May 06, 2018 08:48PM) (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
David has reread all of Austen except Northanger Abbey. I've reread (more than once) all except Mansfield Park, which just doesn't belong. I've reread The Three Musketeers and sequels. A lot of my rereading is for book groups. I've reread a lot of Dickens with this group, and since I had originally read them 50 years ago, I barely remembered anything.

Interesting about Silas Marner. I was forced to read that in school when I was about 13 and hated it. I imagine I would like it better now, so I should try again. I think most of us can appreciate classics more after we have some life experience.


message 39: by David (last edited May 07, 2018 12:00AM) (new)

David (dklemons) Robin wrote: "David has reread all of Austen except Northanger Abbey. I've reread (more than once) all except Mansfield Park, which just doesn't belong. I've reread The Three Musketeers and sequels. A lot of my ..."
I had exactly the same experience with Silas Marner and eventually intend to read it, to see why the State of Texas mandated it for 7th-8th graders back then.


message 40: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 672 comments On the Silas Marner/Jane Austen subject, I discovered JA at thirteen and obsessively read and reread the complete novels; after the fifth read, my English teacher begged me to read something else. I pointed to my JA edition and said, “Well, suggest to me something else like this!” And he—miserable, 20th-century-lit-and-film-loving fool that he was—suggested Silas Marner. I was never so disappointed in all my life! And although I’ve come to terms with Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda as great classics, I’ve never read Silas Marner again.


message 41: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (francesab) | 1870 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "David has reread all of Austen except Northanger Abbey. I've reread (more than once) all except Mansfield Park, which just doesn't belong. I've reread The Three Musketeers and sequels. A lot of my ..."

Funny how we all have a least favourite Jane Austen-for me it was Emma that I never wanted to reread, despite reading all the others multiple times. I finally did for a group read (perhaps this group?) and that reconfirmed my impression.


message 42: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (francesab) | 1870 comments Mod
Abigail wrote: "On the Silas Marner/Jane Austen subject, I discovered JA at thirteen and obsessively read and reread the complete novels; after the fifth read, my English teacher begged me to read something else. ..."

You sound like my daughter, who obsessively reads the Harry Potter cycle over and over, and I'm like your teacher trying to get her to try something else. Unfortunately even Jane Eyre or P&P can't compete at this stage in her life with the magic and excitement of Hogwarts!


message 43: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3743 comments I think we all read Silas Marner in school because it was Eliot's shortest book, and maybe Wharton's Ethan Fromefor the same reason. High schoolers are too young to understand many of the classics anyway. You need some real life under your belt and a strong dose of literary and historical background.


message 44: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3743 comments David wrote: "While it's not literature as such, I've re-read "Guns, Germs and Steel" by Jared Diamond...."

Some critics will tell you it's fiction.


message 45: by David (new)

David (dklemons) Which critics and why?
(Thanks for your comment.)

David


message 46: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "I think we all read Silas Marner in school because it was Eliot's shortest book, and maybe Wharton's Ethan Fromefor the same reason. High schoolers are too young to understand many of the classics ..."

I read neither of those. In middle school we read Tale of Two Cities and The Raft (nonfiction). In high school we had to choose five books and read them. We could pretty much choose from anything.


message 47: by Phrodrick (new)

Phrodrick David wrote: "Which critics and why?
(Thanks for your comment.)

David"


Some critics have theirown agendas.

The one you read is a Pulitzer Prize winner, but IMHO the better JD book on a related topic is:
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed


message 48: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3743 comments David wrote: "Which critics and why?
(Thanks for your comment.)

David"


I don't remember, but not everyone agrees with his theory. I haven't read the 2 books, but I have seen the PBS show made from each one. I think he's brilliant.


message 49: by Mark (last edited Nov 13, 2018 07:12PM) (new)

Mark André Ulysses James Joyce


message 50: by Aubrey (last edited Nov 13, 2018 06:52PM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) Rosemarie wrote: "I have read the Lord of the Rings trilogy at least three times, with intervals of more than years.
I first read it in university when "everybody" was reading it, back in the early 70s.
Another pop..."


Same here with regards to LotR, although I've likely had less years between readings due to not having begun existing till the '90s.

I've also reread at least three of Austen's works (combination of school and for fun), and I can see myself indulging in half of her completed novel canon in the future.


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