Crime Detective Mystery Thriller Group discussion

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What Book Have You Re-read The Most and Why...

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message 1: by Eric (new)

Eric | 59 comments Mod
What book - non-fiction or fiction (not the Bible, though) - have you re-read most often and why do you keep coming back to it?

For me, the fiction book has been The Choirboys by Joseph Wambaugh. This novel is from the seventies and deals with Los Angeles police officers in the seventies.

This book has been instrumental in my concepts of policing - both good and bad - and illustrates a camaraderie in policing that no longer exists (maybe it really never did). Still, it is full of heartbreak, humor and excitement. In my opinion, no single author has captured American policing as well as Wambaugh.


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) This Immortal by Roger Zelazny because it is short, fun, & I notice something new or think about it slightly differently every time. It's full of semi-hidden allusions & humor. It can be read as either SF or fantasy. Is Conrad a mutant or Pan?

Taken as a whole, the Matt Helm series by Donald Hamilton might be the most read in this groups genre, though. Again, the books are quick reads, but have a sprinkling of humor.

They're comfort reads. I really like the hero & know the stories well. Occasionally I'll get out of sorts with the world & these familiar books are a nice vacation to mellow out with.


message 3: by Maureen (new)

Maureen Carden | 187 comments Sharon Bolton's Lacey Flint series beginning with Now You See Me. The are so well -written, the plot is so compelling and the characters are well drawn.


Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice* (sandyj21) Winnie-the-Pooh, because it my favourite book in the whole world!


message 5: by Betty (new)

Betty (bettylouise54) | 123 comments I read REST AND BE THANKFUL by Helen McInnes because I is a just relaxing read nothing major happens to holds your attention.


message 6: by Paula (new)

Paula Adams (goodreadscompadams57) | 95 comments The book I've reread the most is Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach. I get something new from it each time I read it.


message 7: by L.A. (new)

L.A. Kent | 88 comments Me too. Definitely one of my favourite books. In my corporate career as MD I once gave a copy as a Christmas gift for each of my staff.


message 8: by Robyne (new)

Robyne | 3 comments Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice* wrote: "Winnie-the-Pooh, because it my favourite book in the whole world!"

Gosh Sandy, I have never read that book and always thought it was only for kids. On your recommendation I shall purchase it.


message 9: by L.A. (new)

L.A. Kent | 88 comments Lord of the Rings was an annual re-read for me when I was younger. There was always something new to find!


message 10: by Maureen (new)

Maureen Carden | 187 comments I would have to say Anne Cleeland's Murder in Thrall and Kelly Armstrong's City of the Lost are both coming close to the number of times I've read the aforementioned Now You See Me. Plot and character for both.


message 11: by Gary (last edited Feb 18, 2017 09:17AM) (new)

Gary Van Cott | 63 comments Loved Murder In Thrall and it's one of the rare books I have read twice. I found it necessary to reread with what I learned at the end of the book in mind.


message 12: by Robyne (new)

Robyne | 3 comments Sounds interesting, Gary. I just checked it out on the link and yes, sounds like something to keep the reader involved. So far, Not The Body by Shirlie K Plomer is my favourite and after 4 reads through I may still have to read again as I've been invited to read it to folk in an aged care hostel. They are clear of mind and want to hear about true crime. Ha ha. Here's a link if you want to check it out: http://tinyurl.com/jh78hjk


message 13: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Amato (authorcarmenamato) | 32 comments The Spenser series by Robert B. Parker. If you want great dialogue, this series is essential reading.


message 14: by Maureen (new)

Maureen Carden | 187 comments Gary wrote: "Loved Murder In Thrall and it's one of the rare books I have read twice. I found it necessary to reread with what I learned at the end of the book in mind."

Glad I'm not alone in enjoying this book. I highly recommend the other two I mentioned.


message 15: by Sandy (last edited Feb 25, 2017 07:32PM) (new)

Sandy | 5 comments The Stand This is so much a book of good versus evil that I absolutely love it. There are scenes in this book that are so well written that I can put myself in a character's place and I am that character with all his or her flaws. I always feel so bad for The Walking Man's second in command. It seems like he is a man of full loyalty but not a bad man as are many in Las Vegas good people that go there to survive and find out as things start to fall apart that maybe this is the not right place for them.

This and Lord of the Rings...nuff said.


message 16: by David (new)

David After a length of time I have reread some works by Frederick Forsyth, ie. "The Day of the Jackal" and "The Fourth Protocol". I like the way he lays out a story from so many perspectives which lead to the final climax. I recently reread Joseph Heywood's, "The Berkut" with the similar construction of Forsyth. but about the escape of Hitler (fiction of course).

I don't rate many 5's and do not reread a great deal, too many others to try for the first time.


message 17: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) The first three books of the In Death series by J.D. Robb

Naked in Death (In Death, #1) by J.D. Robb Glory in Death (In Death, #2) by J.D. Robb Immortal in Death (In Death, #3) by J.D. Robb

They're my go to audiobooks when I'm feeling down or sick.


message 18: by Patrick (last edited May 24, 2017 09:20AM) (new)

Patrick  (volmann) | 1 comments Each and every James Lee Burke's 'Dave Robicheaux' series, mostly audio. Will Patton is the perfect narrator for Bayou Teche and/or Lolo, Montana.
Dave and Clete are former NOPD detectives and spend their time now mostly in New Iberia, LA and an occasional jaunt to Montana......


message 19: by Mara (new)

Mara Pemberton (marapem) | 18 comments I've relistened to many of my favorite books.


message 20: by Maureen (new)

Maureen Carden | 187 comments Patrick wrote: "Each and every James Lee Burke's 'Dave Robicheaux' series, mostly audio. Will Patton is the perfect narrator for Bayou Teche and/or Lolo, Montana.
Dave and Clete are former NOPD detectives and spen..."


My husband would definitely agree with you about Will Patton. He is the narrator to whom my husband compares all others.


message 21: by Philip (new)

Philip James | 2 comments In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. It's a coincidence that this remarkable book happens to be true crime - for me it's the closest I've ever read to a perfect book, regardless of genre.


message 22: by Maureen (new)

Maureen Carden | 187 comments Philip wrote: "In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. It's a coincidence that this remarkable book happens to be true crime - for me it's the closest I've ever read to a perfect book, regardless of genre."
It changed journalism. Brought in the New Journalism with such practitioners as Hunter Thompson, Tom Wolfe and Gay Talese.
I grew up in KCMO, close enough that the actual story brought a special horror to us.


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