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Announcements > Vogue.com interview with Marjane Satrapi

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message 1: by Emma (new)

Emma Watson (emmawatsonbookclub) | 49 comments Mod
Dear Our Shared Shelf,

Here is a link to my conversation with Marjane on Vogue.com! She was so brilliant!

http://www.vogue.com/13462655/emma-wa...

Let me know what you think.

Love,
Emma


message 2: by Mahima (new)

Mahima Pradhan Cool!


message 3: by Helen (last edited Aug 02, 2016 02:28AM) (new)

Helen (helen2u) | 306 comments I have posted it 2 hours ago, a mod lady can close that thread in announcements and keep this one going. Thank you - you're great at interviews Emma, it's a brilliant piece, with a great author. Love this system of interviewing the authors, it's so amazing!
I'm making myself some green tea and finish it.


message 4: by Helen (new)

Helen (helen2u) | 306 comments Meelie wrote: "(Thanks Helen!! x)"

I was fast, thanks to emma-watson.net, Mike posted it real quick for us, and shared it here. You welcome meelie, in case you missed deleting threads, i give you work!:)


message 5: by Chavi (new)

Chavi | 9 comments I really enjoyed reading this insightful discussion. Thanks for sharing with us.


message 6: by Christine (new)

Christine Periña | 67 comments Wow -that's all I can say after reading this conversation I really feel alive! I'm so energized by the sense of humor of Marjane. Thanks to the both of you for bringing us this kind of wonderful conversation.


message 7: by Harm (last edited Aug 02, 2016 08:08AM) (new)

Harm ten Napel (hnapel) | 94 comments My impression of the interview is that it is more about the life and opinions of Marjane Satrapi than just about writing the book, however this made it a candid talk rather than becoming forced. Emma gave Marjane the space to say what she wanted which resulted in only a few of the prepared questions about Persepolis being asked. By responding with follow up questions it becomes more of a discussion than an interrogation which frankly is what I like about it. I encourage everyone to read it in full.


message 8: by Martin (new)

Martin Felando Marjane is the opposite of boring. She’s willing to share a lot about herself and because she’s from a different world and does unusual things and unusual things happen to her, her perspective is enlightening.

Very funny moment when you both wished for more ball sightings.

How much of the lack of humor in the USA is due to the politics of destruction? I see some humorless people as willfully blind because they want to make political points to gain control.

Also, I think people get hurt and want to remove emotions and seeing the humor is one of the casualties. Joseph Collins expresses some of the consequences: “By starving emotions we become humorless, rigid, and stereotyped; by repressing them we become literal, reformatory, and holier-than-thou; encouraged they perfume life, discouraged they poison it.”

Note to self: never send Marjane the gift of R&B. Ever.

Note to self: if someone covers you in aluminum foil and tosses you down a flight of stairs, don’t panic, you’re exactly where you ought to be.

I wonder if Marjane would enjoy taking black and white photos during her long walks.

As to legalizing prostitution, my thoughts go to protecting the teens, the ones who are easily coerced, and those too wounded to find other options. How can we protect the most vulnerable?

It is encouraging to know that 70% of the students in Iran are female.

Any digital structure or movement that nurtures independent thinking, diversity of intelligence, and financial independence should be encouraged.

Reading that was fun, thanks Emma.


message 9: by Paige (new)

Paige | 48 comments It was great! I read it yesterday. I never usually ask authors questions when given the opportunity here because i never know what to ask them, but i wish that i'd come up with a few! Marjane seems like such an interesting person to have a conversation with! x


message 10: by James (new)

James Corprew "I like to listen to the Stooges, and I shout with them like crazy, and then when all of this anger comes out, I feel a little bit better. "

Go Marjane, i can totally relate to that feeling.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

I think it's a great interview, very insightful.


message 12: by Ashwin (new)

Ashwin (ashiot) | 215 comments Thanks Emma, and Helen (and Mike at emma-watson.net), this was a really good read. I appreciate the fact that emma-watson.net is still active, it's been around for a while!

Anyhow, past midnight. Got to sleep on this one.


message 13: by Helen (new)

Helen (helen2u) | 306 comments Ashwin wrote: "Thanks Emma, and Helen (and Mike at emma-watson.net), this was a really good read. I appreciate the fact that emma-watson.net is still active, it's been around for a while!

Anyhow, past midnight. ..."


yeah the link was on twitter, so jumped right on it. i love ewnet.
:)


message 14: by Paula (new)

Paula | 45 comments Wow such an amazing interview! Thanks for posting it up! Emma and Marjane are so empowering women. I'm glad I got a chance to read it! I needed some inspiration today!


message 15: by Justina (new)

Justina | 1 comments I loved reading this interview! Thank you so much for posting it, Emma! Marjane had so many inspiring things to say, but what really stuck with me was how women judge each other. I am definitely guilty of this, and I have been actively trying to be aware of it so I can stop it.


message 16: by Shana (last edited Aug 02, 2016 08:26PM) (new)

Shana Kaplan (sek1128) | 93 comments Thank you Emma for posting the interview. It was awesome! I can't believe Marjane worried that she was boring and/or long-winded with her answers. I certainly didn't find that to be so at all, just the opposite. I found her answers intriguing and empowering. I agreed with much of what she said. I think she is a fascinating person. Thanks again Emma. You're doing a great job. : )


message 17: by JOSUE (new)

JOSUE (josuemsv) | 29 comments I read it before, is brilliant! :)


message 18: by Juan (new)

Juan Rendon | 1 comments It made me want to read the book after reading the interview. I found interesting as although according to law women have more freedom, the reality is different.


message 19: by Elinor (new)

Elinor | 8 comments I loved reading this interview last night, it kept me up way past my intended bedtime - in a good way. It opened my eyes to a few things and I found it really inspiring. I just want to get up, get out and live my life now! I can't imagine reading something like this and wanting to stay still.

Looking forward to reading the book now when I get the chance.


message 20: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Just a reminder that this interview is also very much open for whomever who would like to help transcribe it and translate it into other languages! :D

Also, looks like I've got something to watch tonight. :)


message 21: by Robert (new)

Robert (robertgilescampbell) Loved reading this interview, it has provided much to think about. The line that stuck out the most to me was...

"You know, Simone de Beauvoir said, “You are not born a woman; you become a woman.” And so you are not born a man either—you become a man, as society teaches you how to behave."

And again thanks for posting this here as well, I do not imagine I would have come across it otherwise.


message 22: by Katelyn, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Katelyn (katelynrh) | 836 comments Mod
Juan wrote: "Elinor wrote: "I loved reading this interview last night, it kept me up way past my intended bedtime - in a good way. It opened my eyes to a few things and I found it really inspiring. I just want ..."

Hi Juan, learn more here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Generally, we try to keep OSS business on Goodreads, so the best way to communicate will be through private messages rather than email ;)


message 23: by Veronica (last edited Aug 03, 2016 04:38PM) (new)

Veronica Paulsen | 1 comments Awesome interview :)

Found it interesting that she pointed out that ANY religion is anti-feminist, I had never thought of this before but the more I think about it the more I find it to be true. Not that religion is inherently anti-feminist, but since all religion is just a product of society they've all become patriarchal in their own ways. The next question would then be to ask is it possible to follow any religion as a feminist? Maybe it would take fundamental redefining of the religion -- and this redefinition can happen personally, meaning however YOU decide to interpret the text and act on your religion etc. can become feminist.

Also, definitely agree that the slow evolution of culture is the only thing that can make a lasting difference, but it's important to point out that laws and revolutions will contribute to the slow evolution of culture! :)

Loved this interview, very powerful!

would love to hear what other people think about religion as anti-feminist, and if people think art or laws are a more efficient way of changing culture :)


message 24: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Katelyn wrote: "Juan wrote: "Elinor wrote: "I loved reading this interview last night, it kept me up way past my intended bedtime - in a good way. It opened my eyes to a few things and I found it really inspiring...."

Exactly! Juan, hope you don't mind me deleting your previous post here. We're pretty big on privacy here, it's the only reason. I've seen your pm, so I'll be with you in a sec. :)


message 25: by Kathrin (new)

Kathrin | 25 comments Wonderful, very personal interview! Thank you all so much!


message 26: by Gerbrich (new)

Gerbrich (euphoniumfamke) | 5 comments Thank you for this amazing interview! I really enjoyed reading it and I think you both made some good points in there. I specifically liked that Marjane spoke about how her parents had taught her that she was a human being and that she could achieve anything a human being could achieve, without stereotypes about gender etc. That is, I believe, something every child ought to learn.


message 27: by Tesnim (new)

Tesnim | 2 comments It was all so good! Tank you for doing this interview! I somehow could relate to Marjane Satrapi on so many ways. I might not have gone through war but my family's history was a way to relate to her story.
I also like her real/no B.S. attitude. She gets to the point and makes clear what we need to talk about and focus on as humans.


message 28: by Anita (new)

Anita | 87 comments I haven't had the chance to read the interview, but will do so soon. I'm very intrigued by all of your comments!


message 29: by Shawn (new)

Shawn Garcia (shawngie) | 6 comments sounds like an interesting lady


message 30: by Jfmcgoff (new)

Jfmcgoff | 1 comments Good interview! Although I always get a little turned off by all the explicatives and I found it quite ironic it was a vogue interview and she specifically hated on women's magazines during the interview. (Although it seemed she was more eluding to the more self help ones)


message 31: by Camille (new)

Camille Mori (yun-sephine) | 1 comments I enjoyed reading this interview so much. It felt authentic and I appreciate that Marjane Satrapi is honest when talking about herself and her experiences. Her stories are certainly personal but I think that honesty is what brings people together to work towards positive change. When we share our experiences authentically in order to create real connections with others, who may also share those experiences, it creates a space that is open for empathetic discussion, analysis, and conversation.


message 32: by Gabriela (new)

Gabriela Sousa | 1 comments I found a little bit problematic the Marjane thoughts about patriarchy problems are women's fault too and is all about intelligence. I mean, if you're socialized by the patriarchy, of course you're going to say to your daughter "you are just a girl and you, my son, can do whatever you want", I mean, you were teached to think like that, so it doesn't make much sense.

Anyway, such pleasure read a conversation between Emma and Marjane, was amazing. Satrapi is everything, I just loved Persepolis and all her books, she's a incredible woman!


message 33: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 1 comments Emma: of all interviews you've done, this is definitely my favorite. Your commitment to the interviewee at been excellent. These are not monologues, it is a genuine conversation. With respect to the content, I think it takes around an hour to complete, I had to stop thinking about what she said, things I had never thought of, and others that needed someone like that to conclude. I can not wait for the next.


message 34: by Raquel (new)

Raquel (booksandrachel) Brilliant. This is by far my favourite interview so far.


message 35: by Brebis (new)

Brebis Emplumée | 5 comments This interview was enlightening. I learned a lot of things. Like Marjane said, I will need some time to digest all these informations.
I don't agree with all that was said, but I think that the aim of this type of interview is to make you think. It succeeded.

Thank you to you both, Marjane and Emma.


message 36: by Chavi (new)

Chavi | 9 comments Veronica wrote: "Awesome interview :)

Found it interesting that she pointed out that ANY religion is anti-feminist, I had never thought of this before but the more I think about it the more I find it to be true. ..."


Hi Veronica, You might be interested in reading 'Faithfully Feminist: Jewish, Christian and Muslim Women on Why We Stay ' - a really interesting collection of personal essays from feminist women of different religions. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...


message 37: by Lindsey (new)

Lindsey (ltuntkee) | 1 comments I had trouble with the original link, but I found the article here: http://www.vogue.com/13462655/emma-wa...


message 38: by Erin (new)

Erin Sakakibara | 2 comments Loved the book, loved the interview...but why Vogue???


message 39: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
Hey, Erin! Hmmm, who knows the reason, but I'm guessing a framework / support is necessary for the interviews and Vogue provided. With Emma being a celebrity and Marjane one of the cool artists that has made it to the mainstream public, I suppose Vogue saw it beneficial for them and reached out.
It doesn't have to be a bad thing, necessarily. Like, I know where you're coming from with your question, but there are different scenarios for different occasions. Such as February, when Emma met Gloria Steinem in a rather fancy and serious looking London theater. :)


message 40: by Margaux Andrea (last edited Aug 11, 2016 02:34PM) (new)

Margaux Andrea (margaux_andrea) | 1 comments I love how Ms. Satrapi swears a lot and the fact that Vogue did not screen any of the swear words. It lends more authenticity to their conversation IMO. That is how people talk in real life.


message 41: by Harm (new)

Harm ten Napel (hnapel) | 94 comments I like it that the format is loose and Emma makes the best of what works at the moment and not tie herself to any venue (well except goodreads...) . I also laud Vogue for not 'editing' any swear words or the derogatory comments that Marjane made about "all the female magazines".


message 42: by Erin (new)

Erin Sakakibara | 2 comments Indeed, I get that there needs to be a vehicle for presenting such an important interview out to more people...it just seems that Vogue is such a hypocritical medium to print such a great interview. Especially when I landed on the top page and saw such ridiculous articles about 'back to school style' and talking about such trivial things as what hairstyle to sport...using a model that is sitting on a private jet. Ugh! I think we can do better. Just sayin'. And frankly, despite my 'understanding' of the real world, I'll keep saying it because it is important. Gloria Steinem in a fancy theatre hardly compares to an interview about what feminism should be in a magazine that clearly is the antithesis of all that was printed in the article about images of women and how we want those to change in the media...regardless of whether the editors of Vogue encouraged it, 'allowed' it or otherwise promoted it.


message 43: by Harm (new)

Harm ten Napel (hnapel) | 94 comments What a rant! I love it, but the fact it's on Vogue doesn't really matter it's just a server and an URL we can link to...


message 44: by Elisa (new)

Elisa Dell'aglio | 1 comments Great, inspiring author and very talented interwever. I wish we read more of such intelligent discussions and debates in magazines and TV shows.


message 45: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie (atira) | 2 comments What an amazing read! Super inspired to dig into some of our books now


message 46: by Dusti (new)

Dusti Prioux | 11 comments Gabriela wrote: "I found a little bit problematic the Marjane thoughts about patriarchy problems are women's fault too and is all about intelligence. I mean, if you're socialized by the patriarchy, of course you're..."

Gabriela, I believe the point of the campaign and our readings is for people to become aware of their actions and question/challenge what they were once taught.

Looking back to when I was a child, there were things said and done by others i knew weren't right so I didn't always agree and I didn't always comply.

So women that allow themselves to believe "of course you're going to say to your daughter "you are just a girl and you, my son, can do whatever you want", I mean, you were teached to think like that, so it doesn't make much sense" do contribute to the problems of inequality. They didn't think for themselves, they blindly followed someone else's (a man's) beliefs.

You can have something shoved down your throat, but they can't force you to believe it. Women (and men) are responsible for questioning what they're taught and evaluating if things really are what they seem, and if there's an injustice, have the courage to do something about it. And that courage certainly starts in a home where a mother says "my daughter is equal to my son. they will be treated fairly." Any woman that can't/won't see that contributes to inequality and sadly also believes she is less of a human compared to any man.


message 47: by Brebis (new)

Brebis Emplumée | 5 comments Dusti wrote: Looking back to when I was a child, there were things said and done by others i knew weren't right so I didn't always agree and I didn't always comply.

So women that allow themselves to believe..."


Dusti, I agree with you. When I was 16 years old, I was in South America. It was twenty years ago (more or less). The men there, were machists (I don't know if it had changed since then). One day my professor of history told us that "yes, men here are machists. But why? Because they are educated like this. By whom? By their mothers".
All the european kids in class were shocked.
Since then I understood that the change begins at home.


message 48: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Ashwin wrote: "Thanks Emma, and Helen (and Mike at emma-watson.net), this was a really good read. I appreciate the fact that emma-watson.net is still active, it's been around for a while!

Anyhow, past midnight. ..."


It's been around for ten years, can't believe it. I simply love that page, because they are respectful and still fill you in with everything that's important.


message 49: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments I simply love Emma as an interviewer, she's perfect in that profession. I also love how there is a discussion rather than a questioning - answering thing going on in this interview. I so love how Marjane is so authentic, how she speaks from experience and we can all learn from her, from her experience. It's wonderful to read that interview, it's so empowering, and as some have already said it, one really wants to go outside and change the world after reading that interview. Or is this just me?


message 50: by Manon (new)

Manon Pujol | 2 comments I really loved this conversation! It made me want to read every other books she wrote! Thank you for sharing it with us and I hope to see more interviews like this!
Manon


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