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General > What are you reading right now? CURRENT THREAD

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message 1: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) This is a continuation of the original long thread. Please now use this thread.

I've closed this thread:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) I'm thoroughly enjoying The Cuckoo's Calling and it's not because its real author is J.K. Rowling and not Robert Galbraith. There is one character in there, a good balance to the main character, that is making this a sort of comfort read for me, so far anyway.


message 3: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments Wow, that's good to hear, Lisa. Is it an easier read than The Casual Vacancy? I understand she's not afraid of the f-word in this one either. I thought it was completely appropriate to TCV, but can't say I'm a huge fan of the word.


message 4: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Laura wrote: "Wow, that's good to hear, Lisa. Is it an easier read than The Casual Vacancy? I understand she's not afraid of the f-word in this one either. I thought it was completely appropriate to TCV, ..."

I think for me the f-word is fine in adult fiction as long as it is not over-used (that being said, if something can be described, if something can be demonstrated on the page without the use of the f-word, I would prefer that, especially considering that there are a lot more interesting and less offensive curse words out there). I have not as yet read The Casual Vacancy (from the synopsis, it does not look like my type of book at all, but I might consider reading it sometime in the future). And with The Cuckoo's Calling, I also don't think I would enjoy the book all that much (I really only like historical mysteries, preferably Mediaeval and Renaissance, or Elizabethan, although I would definitely read a series of HP mysteries if Rowling ever considered such a series).


message 5: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments Ooh, HP mysteries.....I'd love that also.

I agree that there are so many other ways to communicate the same feeling without that word, but sometimes there is just no substitute!


message 6: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Laura wrote: "I agree that there are so many other ways to communicate the same feeling without that word, but sometimes there is just no substitute!"

Exactly, the language used has to fit the characters and the situation. The dialogs have to be credible. I think. Maybe a book with such language is simply not a book one wants to read, but that language is necessary for some books.


message 7: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Chrissie wrote: "Laura wrote: "I agree that there are so many other ways to communicate the same feeling without that word, but sometimes there is just no substitute!"

Exactly, the language used has to fit the cha..."


It definitely is necessary for some books but there are also authors who revel in the use of off-colour words (especially the f-bomb) and over-use of the latter (just like over use of stilted and unnatural dialogue etc. can ruin a book stylistically).


message 8: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Gundula, I agree with what you are saying too!


message 9: by Lance (new)

Lance Greenfield (lancegreenfieldmitchell) | 697 comments My current bedside book is The Stonor Eagles, paperback version. It's a damned fine read, and although it was first published in 1986, William Horwood writes in a style which is more reminscent of a couple of decades earlier. I take comfort in that.

I'm also reading an e-book version of Beyond the Elastic Limit: An Epic Fable, because I can read it on the move, even on my phone whilst my wife is selecting the best vegetables in the supermarket! It is also a good read so far. I correspond with the author, Howard Loring on the Time Travel group. He is a character, and his writing has character too. I'm enjoying it.


message 10: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) Laura, I think it's much easier to get into than The Casual Vacancy, and unlike that book, I haven't noticed the same amount of profanity in The Cuckoo's Calling, so whatever is there must fit fine.


message 11: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments Excellent! Thanks, Lisa.


message 12: by Becky (new)

Becky (ebab) Reading "It's Never To Late" by Tara Taylor Quinn in paperback It's Never Too Late by Tara Taylor Quinn


message 13: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Now I am listening to The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime that Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars. It is non-fiction and very exciting. For me true crime is better than fictional!

I just finished Anil's Ghost and by the end I liked it a lot, but not in the beginning. Ondaatje isn't the easiest author to follow. His books always hop all over the place, but he can write beautifully, and he gets you thinking.
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 14: by Jessika (new)

Jessika (jessalittlenerdy) I'm about 2/3 of the way done with The Penderwicks on Gardam Street by Jeanne Birdsall, which is the second in a really great series of children's books.

This morning, I think I will also start The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards. I've had it on my shelf for a while, and I'm anxious to read it.


message 15: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments In these week I've finished The Eyes of the Dragon and Lord of the Flies. I really liked both, although of different genres. Now it's time to think the next book.


message 16: by Jessika (new)

Jessika (jessalittlenerdy) Andrew wrote: "In these week I've finished The Eyes of the Dragon and Lord of the Flies. I really liked both, although of different genres. Now it's time to think the next book."

I remember really liking The Eyes of the Dragon when I read it years back, I ought to give it a re-read. I didn't really like Lord of the Flies when I had to read it for school, but I've been thinking about giving it another try.


message 17: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments Jess wrote: "Andrew wrote: "In these week I've finished The Eyes of the Dragon and Lord of the Flies. I really liked both, although of different genres. Now it's time to think the next book."

I remember really..."


I also liked "The Eyes of the Dragon", not a cassical novel by Stephen King, but a good fantasy. Instead, I found "The Lord of the Flies" a bit heavy. The problem is that the crash and the fact of being marooned on an island, would suggest something like Robinson Crusoe, very funny. Instead all what happens to boys must be interpreted by reader to understand the nature of the characters and their conflicts. Exactly the kind of book that you are forced to read at school: not bad but once is enough.


message 19: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments I've started The Gunslinger, the first book of "The Dark Tower" series. I don't know if I'll read them all, but in the meantime let's start with this.


message 20: by Jessika (new)

Jessika (jessalittlenerdy) Andrew wrote: "I've started The Gunslinger, the first book of "The Dark Tower" series. I don't know if I'll read them all, but in the meantime let's start with this."

I love this series. Don't give up after the first book. Even though it's one of my favorite books, it's different than the rest of them. If you can make it through, definitely pick up the second and give the rest of them a try!


message 21: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments Jess wrote: "Andrew wrote: "I've started The Gunslinger, the first book of "The Dark Tower" series. I don't know if I'll read them all, but in the meantime let's start with this."

I love this series. Don't giv..."


I'm at half of the book and I like the story: it's intriguing and mysterious and throught flashbacks, there is a panoramic on the life of Roland. Definitely I'll read the others.


message 22: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Finished listening to The Walking People.
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...
Many of you will recognize this author from her newer book Fever. Actually I think many will enjoy this novel, particularly in its audio format.

Will start The Sound of Things Falling since I have heard good things about this Colombian author.


message 23: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments I just finished The Gunslinger, the first book of "The Dark Tower" series.
Despite many negative comment I saw on the book's page, I liked and I found it fluent and never boring. I think that I'll read also the other books of the series.


message 24: by Becky (new)

Becky (ebab) Just started "Take Me Home For Christmas" by Brenda Novak for review on my computer. Take Me Home for Christmas (Whiskey Creek, #5) by Brenda Novak


message 25: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments I just started Voyage to the Red Planet, till now, an interesting and funny novel.


message 26: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Finished The Sound of Things Falling.
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Ok, I am listening to The Savage Detectives...... this type of book is not my usual read. Maybe it is more for the younger crowd. To be more specific, there is explicit sex and at least now it seems rather juvenile, but I am sticking it out. It does capture quite well how young intellectuals philosophize, but much seems to be sophistry. I have tried to find out what exactly the Visceral Realist Movement is, and the question is if it is a movement at all!


message 27: by Covingtoncat73 (new)

Covingtoncat73 | 13 comments Hi. Larua and Lisa, I should put those on my TBR list. Right now I'm reading The City in the Autumn Stars by Michael Moorcock. I'm really enjoying it. It is historical fiction/fantasy set at the time of the French Revolution. I understand it is part of a series but the fact I haven't read the others doesn't seem to be affecting my ability to follow the story.


message 28: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I have dumpedThe Savage Detectives, which so many praise. NOT ME! I listened to 7 of 27 hours and could take it no more.
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Moving on toA House in the Sky. Non-fiction and exciting, or so I have been told. I really have to wash my brain after the last book.


message 29: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Completed Forbidden Journey and it was good. Ella Maillart traveled in 1935 with Peter Fleming from Peking to Srinagar, Kashmir, by predominantly donkey, horse, camel and her own two feet. Some train and lorries too. Peter Fleming is the older brother of Ian Fleming. Peter has written his own book but I have not read that. For me it was a bit too much on the difficulties of the trip rather than the people and areas she traveled through. Still, definitely worth reading if travel literature is you thing.

My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

I will try An Army of Angels: A Novel of Joan of Arc. I wonder how it will compare with Mark Twain's Joan of Arc which I did like. The author thought this was his best book.


message 30: by Laura (last edited Sep 15, 2013 04:53AM) (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments I've discovered a series that I'm absolutely crazy about. It's urban fantasy detective fiction. I know. It sounds weird and maybe not too great, but it is delightful. And I can vouch for the audiobooks as well!

Funny, creative and whimsical, I am loving it so far. Has anyone else read this series? Harry Dresden is the wizard detective main character.

Storm Front Storm Front (The Dresden Files, #1) by Jim Butcher


message 31: by Andrew (last edited Sep 15, 2013 02:23PM) (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments I've finished Voyage to the Red Planet and I really liked it. It's not only a sci-fi book: it's a funny book, with characters defined with humor, the story of an incredible voyage with surreal situations, that stimulates your imagination.


message 32: by Linda (new)

Linda Watson (cookforgood) | 2 comments I'm in a comfort-reading and comfort-movie nest right now, having lost my beloved father-in-law in July and my father last week. I just finished Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage by Elizabeth Gilbert, a perfect follow-up to her Eat, Pray, Love. Both books make me feel grateful for what I still have and better understand what I've lost. The book Eat Pray Love is so much better than the movie, truly intimate, funny, and inspiring.

For comfort-movie lovers, I recommend a Julia Roberts film festival (Runaway Bride, My Best Friend's Wedding, Erin Brockovich, and Eat Pray Love) and About A Boy. Has anyone read Nick Hornby's book About a Boy?


message 33: by Becky (new)

Becky (ebab) Just started reading "Through The Smoke" by Brenda Novak on computer for review. Through the Smoke by Brenda Novak


message 34: by Darkpool (new)

Darkpool | 222 comments Laura wrote: "I've discovered a series that I'm absolutely crazy about. It's urban fantasy detective fiction. I know. It sounds weird and maybe not too great, but it is delightful. And I can vouch for the..."

I've read the first 3 (or rather read the first and listened to the audio of 2 & 3) & love them... and have been told that after the first 4 they start getting really good!!!!


message 35: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) I just started The Unbearable Lightness of Being. I'm sure it won't be a comfort read and I'm not optimistic that I'll even like it, but it's for my real world book club. I shall see. I just finished reading The Cuckoo's Calling, which I did thoroughly enjoy.


message 36: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments Darkpool wrote: "Laura wrote: "I've discovered a series that I'm absolutely crazy about. It's urban fantasy detective fiction. I know. It sounds weird and maybe not too great, but it is delightful. And I can..."

Excellent! Thanks, Darkpool!


message 37: by Laura (last edited Sep 17, 2013 05:58AM) (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 157 comments Lisa wrote: "I just started The Unbearable Lightness of Being. I'm sure it won't be a comfort read and I'm not optimistic that I'll even like it, but it's for my real world book club. I shall see. I just finish..."

So glad to hear it, since I wound up buying the Audible book (for Cuckoo's). :))


message 38: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I can highly recommend A House in the Sky. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author. I appreciated hearing the voice of the woman who lived through the events. This is her story and it should be narrated by her. The narration is absolutely excellent.

My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

One book leads to another. My next will be Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic WomenNine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic Women.


message 39: by Linda (new)

Linda Watson (cookforgood) | 2 comments Christie, I adored Nine Parts of Desire. It's a terrific book club book, too. I read it years ago and still think of it often. I might even consider it a comfort book in the sense of being reminded of my freedoms.


message 40: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Linda, I am enjoying it, for its content. I happen to be listening to the audiobook read by the author and that is bad, the narration I mean. For this reason it is better to read than listen to. You hear in the author's voice when she thinks some people's opinions are stupid and this comes across as being nonobjective.


message 41: by Andrew (last edited Sep 18, 2013 11:12AM) (new)

Andrew (andrew619) | 121 comments After finished Voyage to the Red Planet, I'm reading The Neverending Story (even with a few years of delay) and The Man With Two Left Feet


message 42: by Chrissie (last edited Sep 19, 2013 05:29AM) (new)

Chrissie Finished Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic Women set in Saudi Arabia and other countries of the Near East. Non-fiction about Islamic women's lives in the beginning of the 90s. Definitely interesting.
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Have started The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed. My son studied forestry so this is particularly interesting for me, and I quite simply value forests and lakes, where I like being and walking Oscar.


message 43: by Lance (new)

Lance Greenfield (lancegreenfieldmitchell) | 697 comments I've just listened to the first CD of the audio book of Burial Rites. The reviews are correct. The writing is superb and the reading of it is absolutely perfect!


message 44: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Lance, oh now I am smiling!!!!!! so glad you love Burial Rites

I hope you are having a good time.


message 45: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I definitely enjoyed The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed narrated by the talented Edoardo Ballerini. You have to at least look at the gorgeous Golden Spruce. Once you have seen it you want to know why it was chopped down!
My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Now I have started Blood Makes Noise, because for a long time I have been interested in learning more about Eva Perón (1919-1952), Evita, and what happened to her body after her death. This is historical fiction but it begins by stating that it is based on true facts.


message 46: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jhaltenburger) Finished two today: An Absolute Scandal An Absolute Scandal by Penny Vincenzi and Never Go Back Never Go Back (Jack Reacher, #18) by Lee Child . Almost done with Hit Me Hit Me by Lawrence Block and am also reading Testimony of Two Men Testimony of Two Men by Taylor Caldwell , All About All About Eve: The Complete Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Bitchiest Film Ever Made! All About All About Eve The Complete Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Bitchiest Film Ever Made! by Sam Staggs and Laced with Magic Laced with Magic (Sugar Maple, #2) by Barbara Bretton . I'm enjoying all of them but seem to be taking longer to get through them than usual.


message 47: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
I'm ripping through The Silver Linings Playbook which my fried Joy recommended to me. It's completely different that what I was expecting, not exactly a comfort read but interesting! I had the impression from seeing movie previews that it was romantic comedy of some sort but instead it's told from the perspective of a mentally ill man in recovery. The narrative really pulls you in!


message 48: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) Lee, I've got to get to this one. Got my recommendation from Joy too. I really loved the movie, but know the book is different, and most say even better, as is typical. Thanks for reminding me again of it.


message 49: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (leekat) | 3959 comments Mod
I'll be very curious to see the movie when I'm done reading. It's a very quick read. I picked up the book and read half of it before I could blink last night.


message 50: by Selena (new)

Selena | 3 comments My daughter (9yrs) and I are currently reading The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis. We read a chapter a night and have had some amazing discussions afterwards. While the subject is intense (Taliban in Afghanistan) the story doesnt become graphic.
Once we are done our shared chapter she turns to Heroes Guide to Saving the Kingdom, a funny spin on the princesses and their Prince Charmings.
Since I am currently in the mood for something more lighthearted I am reading Dont Know how she Does It. Its not earth shattering but is a fun read about the working mom.
Im not sure what book will be next for our shared reading or for our individual picks. Im leaning towards Anne of Green Gables to give her a bit of a mind break :-)


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