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message 1: by Yakara (new)

Yakara I was a die hard real paper fan. I adamantly refused to buy an e-book reader and laughed when people suggested it. Then I bought one because I was starting to have to use books as furniture if I wanted to keep buying them.

Needless to say, I love my Kindle. I bought a Kindle Keyboard 2 years ago (could've been longer...who knows) and can't imagine going back.

Yes, I am still a fan of the smell of paper and the feel of holding a book. However, the benefits of my Kindle far outweigh those loves. I can change the size of the font (big thing for me), use a cover with a build in reading light (stops my husband from fretting at 1 am when I am so deep in a book I can't sleep) and it can't overrun my house if I read as much as I want.

Which do you prefer and why?


message 2: by Erin (new)

Erin Latimer I am, and think I always will be, a die hard paper fan. People are always telling me that I'll "join the masses" ect, because it's just so convenient, but I don't think that'll ever happen. I stare at a computer screen all day, so the last thing I want to do in my down time is stare at another, smaller screen in order to read.

Plus I love the smell and feel of real books, and I've got a library of them that I escape to whenever I can.


message 3: by Marie (new)

Marie Browne (MarieBrowne) | 6 comments I was a paper fan but it just became ridiculous. We live on a narrow boat and I was paying £60 a month for a storage unit just to keep our books in (We had just over 2000) then the kindle came out. It was the best thing that ever happened. I still have my favourite books on the boat and I don't think they'll ever be moved but now I can buy a new book as soon as it becomes electric and I don't have to worry about the trim on the boat changing. :-)

As I get older I'm also finding that, as Yakara said, being able to change the font size is just such a fantastic thing. Point: Don't drop a kindle into the bath, you can't just stick it on a radiator to dry out like you can a book :-(


message 4: by Eliza (new)

Eliza Green I jump between them. I like paper books, but they can be awkward to read at night, especially if they're bulky. Ebooks can be convenient. Definitely depends on my mood.


Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) A few years ago I was among the people who scoffed at the idea of using an ereader, but I've been a convert for about two years now.

Kindle ftw!


message 6: by Erin (new)

Erin Latimer I can understand the space thing. I have an entire different room for my books, lol. But that's me, I love having a library/study to write in.

Yeah, I don't trust myself with a kindle either. I've dropped books in the ocean, in the bath, on the ground, in the dirt, ect. haha, not good.


message 7: by Yakara (new)

Yakara I have not had any incidents with my Kindle (knocking on wood). Between myself and all of my kids we have 5000+ books in the house. That was last count 2+ years ago. Since then, I've bought 7 kindles. 5 regular, 2 Fire. Each of the kids has one, including my youngest.

One other benefit I have found is that we can all read the same book at the same time with one purchase. This makes it very easy when a new Rick Riordan comes out.

My oldest and youngest have Fires. The youngest is 8 and can read illustrated books in color on it. That was a big selling point. My eldest can read and text...don't consider the texting a selling point, but she is an avid reader so there is the trade off.

The kids all still use the library at school and read "real" books.


Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) How do you drop a book in the ocean? Were you somehow able to open the door of the plane mid-flight?


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

I too thought that I would never be an ebook reader when they first came out. I loved my paper books. Loved buying them. Holding them. Reading them. Carrying them around with me. Keeping favorites. And handing out others to friends. I fought against the idea of digital books. They weren't really 'mine' I thought. Shrug. Anyway. I bought the first gen nook. And it was love at first sight. Now today I don't read paper if I can help it. Space is a big reason for me. But also the ease of buying books. There's only one Barnes and Nobles out my way now and they don't stock as well as they should. Older books are almost impossible to find. And even newer books are hard to keep in stock. My eyesight has always been bad so that's another reason. I actually have three ereaders now. I have a nook hd+, which I love but sometimes the glare on the screen can bother me. I have a nook simple touch, for when I need a non glare screen. And a kindle for those books only Amazon has. I couldn't do without my ereaders.


message 10: by Jon (new)

Jon (jon17) | 4 comments Erin, regarding 'staring at another, smaller screen':
First, the electronic ink technology used in the regular Kindles/Nooks is different than the LCD technology in monitors/iPads. It actually feels like reading a regular book. Give it a try.

Second, about the size: it's about the size of a paperback, but it's even more comfortable because you can adjust the size of the font. Many real books have annoyingly small text.

I don't expect to persuade you; just wanted to clear those points.

I personally enjoy both ebooks and tbooks.


message 11: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (featherlashes) I too hated the idea of ereaders. My husband bought me a kindle for my bday and it just sat there. Feeling guilty for not using the gift I bought an Ebook and then found myself buting another and another... There are some benefits that I've come to love: I can bring multiple books on vacation, etc without an extra piece of luggage, I can read in any setting regardless of what the book cover looks like, I have a kindle app on my phone so if i don't have my kindle with me I can still read and its the equivalent of carrying a library in my pocket, my library loans ebooks. Disadvantages: if the apocalypse happens I'm screwed.


message 12: by Miranda (new)

Miranda | 10 comments My fi bought me a nook a year or so ago. I've been off and on with it but lately I've been carrying it with me everywhere.

I still really prefer paper books and I can get drawn into them so much easier. Although, whenever it warms up I'll probably grab for my nook when we go for day fishing trips :)

I've only ever bought 2 ebooks so I will continue to buy paper books. I can't bring myself to actually buy an ebook.


message 13: by Sky (new)

Sky (skyswriting) I prefer the physical copy of the book over an e-reader, though I am finding e-readers convenient for trading books with friends across the country, and not to mention the cool freebie gems I stumble upon on in the Kindle store =) But I much rather get comfy turning pages!
I dunno how I'd feel if everything became electronic, I'd go stirr-crazy with a bookstore to hang out in!


message 14: by 爱心❤ (new)

爱心❤ | 256 comments I love my e reader because of how convenient it is! however, the smell of a new paper book....


message 15: by Eydís (new)

Eydís (eydis) | 46 comments I prefer paper, I love the smell of a new book as well of an old one.
If I'm reading something for school however Kindle versions are "the thing".

Paper versions are number one, audio books number two (I love being able to do something practical while listening to something I like), and Kindle/E-books number three.


message 16: by 爱心❤ (new)

爱心❤ | 256 comments Audios are great, make me feel like I'm not wasting time :)


message 17: by Lizzy (last edited Mar 25, 2013 12:10AM) (new)

Lizzy Lessard I prefer paperback for books that I pay for, but ebooks for those that I get for review. I don't want to waste an author's money if I hate their book.


message 18: by Karin (new)

Karin Cox (wwwgoodreadscomkarin_cox) | 6 comments I used to think that, as someone who worked in trade publishing, I would never jump onto the ebook bandwagon. I was SO wrong. Now, I hardly ever buy paperbacks and if I do, I still buy the Kindle version. I find it much easier to read my Kindle in bed, in the bath (in a ziplock bag) and just about everywhere and the amount I read (while always a lot) has increased. Love my Kindle and my iPad and my iPhone and I read across all three depending on where I am.


message 19: by Erin (new)

Erin Latimer Jon wrote: "Erin, regarding 'staring at another, smaller screen':
First, the electronic ink technology used in the regular Kindles/Nooks is different than the LCD technology in monitors/iPads. It actually feel..."


Fair enough. You still have to sort of "flick" down the page though, right? I get carpal tunnel, so I have to take breaks from the computer. I break by reading, so if I still had to make the same sort of "iphone" motions I would be frustrated.

I could only see myself doing ebooks if someday I travel a lot. I usually end up with another suit case full of books when I go away. :D


Laurie: Almost Faemous (laurie-almostfaemous) | 40 comments Ebooks all the way, first I love the idea of not wasting paper and it's so easy to carry around my entire library in my purse.


message 21: by Amanda (new)

Amanda (dreamocracy) | 23 comments Yeah, it's crazy, I used to be a HUGE paper supporter, because I love the feel of a book in my hands, but then I got my Kindle Touch and I could not love that thing more! I greatly prefer ebooks now, unless it is something with lots of pictures, since they don't look good on my Touch.


message 22: by Lauren (new)

Lauren wilkerson (meowitslauren) | 1 comments I will always be a paper fan I wouldn't even think about buying a nook


message 23: by The Angry Lawn Gnome (last edited Apr 23, 2013 10:38AM) (new)

The Angry Lawn Gnome (mostlyharmlessreviews) I guess I'm just too old, or too much the Luddite to accept change or some such thing, but reading books electronically just seems, well, kind of inauthentic to me.

And I say that as someone who has read e-texts on an I-Pod Touch, I-Phone, Kindle and Samsung 10" tablet. And also owns all those devices. So, go figure. But something always seems, well, "off" to me. The screen in too small on the I-Pod Touch and I-Phone, my Kindle is a first gen with a monochrome screen, and I find myself getting distracted reading on the tablet. (Though with the tablet I don't seem to have problems doing the readings for my profession's continuing education classes, curiously. Haven't foggiest idea why that should be.)


message 24: by Stan (new)

Stan Morris (morriss003) Lumpenprole wrote: "I guess I'm just too old, or too much the Luddite to accept change or some such thing, but reading books electronically just seems, well, kind of inauthentic to me.

And I say that as someone who h..."


I'm 62 and I never thought I would read on a kindle. But I was wrong. Whenever I have an appointment that will take some time, like getting the car serviced, I take my kindle. I could take a book, but sometimes I find that I'm not in the mood for that particular book. If I have my kindle, I can switch to something else. It's a lot cheaper to buy some books on the kindle. It paid for itself in the first 30 days I had it. I still purchase paperbacks and hard covers, but my kindle is essential to me now.


message 25: by Sydney (new)

Sydney Wallace | 75 comments I know Nooks and Kindles have their place, but still, nothing compares to holding a book in your hand.


message 26: by Alex (new)

Alex (acobaf) I know I should answer with paper back, that my generations go to choice I think, but I love e readers! I have a kindle, nook and ipad, along with my newest addition to the tablet family my Samsung galaxy. I can't go anywhere without them, they have become and extension of myself. I love being able to make bookshelves, keep track of my books and whats coming out, also the highlighting my favorite quote and automatically sharing them online or on my blog is helpful. I like the contrast, being able to read at night or day and changing the color of the writing as well as the font size. So, I'm ebook all the way! Plus a lot of indie authors can't publish paperbacks and I love, love, love indie authors!


message 27: by The Angry Lawn Gnome (last edited Jun 19, 2013 08:24AM) (new)

The Angry Lawn Gnome (mostlyharmlessreviews) Interesting that this thread has come back on the radar screen. I'm actually starting to come around a bit more to reading on my tablet than I had been...but I'm feeling a bit guilty/creeped out that Amazon is now selling 27% of all unit book sales. (Presumably this is a USA only figure, though the link I found didn't state that.)

That kind of monopoly power just doesn't seem right, somehow. Though I suppose on the plus side there's the fact that if Amazon ever became truly obnoxious people would simply desert it in droves and look elsewhere like it seemed many did to MySpace for Facebook, and it seems at least some are now doing to Facebook itself, though we'll see what happens there.


The Angry Lawn Gnome (mostlyharmlessreviews) Alexandra wrote: "I love being able to make bookshelves, keep track of my books and whats coming out, also the highlighting my favorite quote and automatically sharing them online or on my blog is helpful. I like the contrast, being able to read at night or day and changing the color of the writing as well as the font size...."

I'm afraid I don't know how to do ANY of this, either on my Kindle (a 1st gen monochrome w/no backlighting) or my Samsung tablet. :(


message 29: by Tasha (new)

Tasha Turner (tashaturner) | 116 comments I have multiple reading apps on my iPad. You can always use Amazon to discover books and buy from other places... That would be using them the opposite of how many others do... Where they go to live stores, check Amazons prices, buy from Amazon. I have, kindle, nook, kobo, overdrive, blio, iBooks, and a few other book apps on my tablet. I use kndle followed by overdrive the most but if any of Amazons competitors would make it easier to find books and more indie authors would take advantage of all the places their books could be up for sale I'd switch. The kindle app sucks - no selves, no easy way to see what I've read, what I've started reading, just what it considers most recent (a joke after updates as several times its forced me to redownload my entire library), author, title - with over 2800+ books its a nightmare to browse my own books.

Barnes & Noble and Borders had most of the book selling market putting indies out of business before Amazon came along. Now Borders is gone, B&N is struggling, indie stories are starting to make a comeback (kobo works with indie stores).

One constant is change. At some point Amazon shareholders will decide that Amazon should be making a profit. On that day everything will change.


message 30: by Stan (new)

Stan Morris (morriss003) Lumpenprole wrote: "Interesting that this thread has come back on the radar screen. I'm actually starting to come around a bit more to reading on my tablet than I had been...but I'm feeling a bit guilty/creeped out th..."

I agree even though I purchase a lot from Amazon. But it will be difficult to purchase books for Android tablets until Google gets its bookstore right. I'm still buying paper from some of my favorite authors, but I started buying their books in ebook format this year, and I don't think that will change.


message 31: by Hilary (new)

Hilary (hilarywithonel) Another huge benefit for ebooks: there are so very more free ones, and new ones become available all the time. And many of them are actually worth reading!


message 32: by Judy (new)

Judy Goodwin | 18 comments Erin wrote: "Jon wrote: "Erin, regarding 'staring at another, smaller screen':
First, the electronic ink technology used in the regular Kindles/Nooks is different than the LCD technology in monitors/iPads. It a..."


If you have a Kindle, it's not a flick but a very light touch to move the page forward. I have carpal tunnel too, and I'm thankful it's so easy to use. I also prefer the e-ink, which does feel like reading a book.

I too insisted that I'd never go to eBook but then I had to clear space in my house and decided I'd better try it out. I rarely buy paper books now and love the fact that I can carry tons of books in my Kindle inside my purse wherever I go.


message 33: by Kat (new)

Kat (kat_books) While I love having physical books, I do have a lack of space to store all the books that I buy, so...I have converted to mainly purchasing ebooks. But if I really like the book I will buy a paperback copy. Or if I already have a series in paperback I will continue the series in paperback.


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Still haven't gotten myself an ereader, they seem pretty rad from fiddling with those of friends/family. Ideally, it'd be both. I really love looking at comics digitally, that's for sure.


message 35: by Becca (new)

Becca Rose (beccarose86) | 21 comments I didn't want an e-reader until I joined this group and I seen you give away ebooks for reviews. Now I want one! Hopefully for Christmas!


message 36: by Heather (new)

Heather (clockwork_wings) | 13 comments It depends. With an ereader, I like that I can get a book right then, no trip to the bookstore and hope they have it in stock. With paper, I like that the batteries never run out. With an ereader, I like that I can carry the six or seven books I tend to read at once at the same time. Typically, though, if I buy the first in a series in one format, that's the format I want the sequels in, so I don't split the difference.


message 37: by Book (new)

Book Falcons (bookfalcons) | 1 comments Both, as long as I get to read :)


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* (erinpaperbackstash) I prefer books and mainly read those. I have a Kindle fire for the netgalley ARcs and free books. I don't spend money on ebooks myself.


message 39: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 92 comments Both. It depends on where and when. I love reading paper books outside in the summer. However, in winter with lower sunlight I prefer ebooks. I also prefer ebooks when I read in bed.


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