Philosophy Of Mathematics Books

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Phaedo Phaedo (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 4.04 — 9,808 ratings — published -380
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The Republic The Republic (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 3.94 — 163,235 ratings — published -380
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Meno Meno (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 3.95 — 6,611 ratings — published -386
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Philosophies of Mathematics Philosophies of Mathematics (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 4.20 — 25 ratings — published 2001
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Gödel's Proof Gödel's Proof (Hardcover)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 4.16 — 4,670 ratings — published 1958
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Is God a Mathematician? Is God a Mathematician? (Hardcover)
by (shelved 2 times as philosophy-of-mathematics)
avg rating 3.83 — 1,275 ratings — published 2009
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Bertrand Russell
“When I was young, most teachers of philosophy in British and American universities were Hegelians, so that, until I read Hegel, I supposed there must be some truth to his system; I was cured, however, by discovering that everything he said on the philosophy of mathematics was plain nonsense.”
Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Origin of the Logical. Where has logic originated in men’s heads? Undoubtedly out of the illogical, the domain of which must originally have been immense. But numberless beings who reasoned otherwise than we do at present, perished; albeit that they may have come nearer to truth than we! Whoever, for example, could not discern the "like" often enough with regard to food, and with regard to animals dangerous to him, whoever, therefore, deduced too slowly, or was too circumspect in his deductions, had smaller probability of survival than he who in all similar cases immediately divined the equality. The preponderating inclination, however, to deal with the similar as the equal - an illogical inclination, for there is no thing equal in itself - first created the whole basis of logic. It was just so (in order that the conception of substance should originate, this being indispensable to logic, although in the strictest sense nothing actual corresponds to it) that for a long period the changing process in things had to be overlooked, and remain unperceived; the beings not seeing correctly had an advantage over those who saw everything "in flux." In itself every high degree of circumspection in conclusions, every sceptical inclination, is a great danger to life. No living being might have been preserved unless the contrary inclination - to affirm rather than suspend judgment, to mistake and fabricate rather than wait, to assent rather than deny, to decide rather than be in the right - had been cultivated with extraordinary assiduity. - The course of logical thought and reasoning in our modern brain corresponds to a process and struggle of impulses, which singly and in themselves are all very illogical and unjust; we experience usually only the result of the struggle, so rapidly and secretly does this primitive mechanism now operate in us.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science

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