Gottlob Frege


Born
in Wismar, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany
November 08, 1848

Died
July 26, 1925

Genre

Influences


Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege (German: [ˈɡɔtloːp ˈfreːɡə]) was a German mathematician, logician and philosopher. He is considered to be one of the founders of modern logic and made major contributions to the foundations of mathematics. He is generally considered to be the father of analytic philosophy, for his writings on the philosophy of language and mathematics. While he was mainly ignored by the intellectual world when he published his writings, Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932) and Bertrand Russell (1872–1970) introduced his work to later generations of logicians and philosophers.

Average rating: 4.14 · 1,242 ratings · 48 reviews · 58 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Foundations of Arithmet...

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4.18 avg rating — 780 ratings — published 1884 — 31 editions
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The Frege Reader

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4.03 avg rating — 133 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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On Sense and Reference

3.99 avg rating — 96 ratings2 editions
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Begriffsschrift und andere ...

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4.17 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 1879 — 3 editions
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Translations from the Philo...

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4.09 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1952 — 5 editions
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Logical Investigations

3.72 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 1966 — 6 editions
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Conceptual Notation and Rel...

4.28 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1972
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Frege and Godel: Two Fundam...

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4.50 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2002
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Funktion, Begriff, Bedeutun...

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4.07 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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Posthumous Writings

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4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1979 — 4 editions
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More books by Gottlob Frege…
“Every good mathematician is at least half a philosopher, and every good philosopher is at least half a mathematician.”
Gottlob Frege

“A scientist can hardly encounter anything more desirable than, just as a work is completed, to have its foundation give way.”
Gottlob Frege

“What is it, in fact, that we are supposed to abstract from, in order to get, for example, from the moon to the number 1? By abstraction we do indeed get certain concepts, viz. satellite of the Earth, satellite of a planet, non-self-luminous heavenly body, heavenly body, body, object. But in this series 1 is not to be met with; for it is no concept that the moon could fall under. In the case of 0, we have simply no object at all from which to start our process of abstracting. It is no good objecting that 0 and 1 are not numbers in the same sense as 2 and 3. What answers the question How many? is number, and if we ask, for example, "How many moons has this planet?", we are quite as much prepared for the answer 0 or 1 as for 2 or 3, and that without having to understand the question differently. No doubt there is something unique about 0, and about 1000; but the same is true in principle of every whole number, only the bigger the number the less obvious it is. To make out of this a difference in kind is utterly arbitrary. What will not work with 0 and 1 cannot be essential to the concept of number.”
Gottlob Frege