Otter Quotes

Quotes tagged as "otter" Showing 1-10 of 10
T.J. Klune
“You were the only thing that made me feel safe when the earthquakes threatened to break me. I needed you here because when you're not here, I don't have a home.”
T.J. Klune, Bear, Otter, and the Kid

T.J. Klune
“Bear. It’s always been you. It will always be you. I love you, and that’s why it will always be enough.”
TJ Klune, Bear, Otter, and the Kid

Kenneth Grahame
“It'll be all right, my fine fellow," said the Otter. "I'm coming along with you, and I know every path blindfold; and if there's a head that needs to be punched, you can confidently rely upon me to punch it.”
Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

T.J. Klune
“You can't just wipe away your history.”
TJ Klune, Bear, Otter, and the Kid

T.J. Klune
“Creed scowls. "Hardly. All he does now is mope like a goddamn teenage girl. Anytime I'm home, he's in his room with the door locked. I'm telling you guys, he got worked over really bad in San Diego. I thought the whole point of having a gay brother was that they were supposed to be all cool and shit. I got a defective gay.”
T.J. Klune, Bear, Otter, and the Kid

Giorge Leedy
“A WATERY BLISS

As busy as an ice cream freezer,
On a Sunday getting hotter,
Happy is the honey eater-
The busy ocean otter,
Floating alongside Teter,
On a sea full of water.”
Giorge Leedy, Uninhibited From Lust To Love

T.J. Klune
“He hesitates, then says, "You don't think Otter... gets offended by what I say?" He begins to speak faster. "I mean, I don't care who Otter sleeps with. I don't care that he's a fa- gay. I don't care that he's gay. Why would I ?" He grins thinly. "He's my brother. You don't turn away from someone like him just because he likes sick instead if the good stuff.”
T.J. Klune, Bear, Otter, and the Kid

David Clement-Davies
“Freedom without responsibility? What freedom is that? None at all.”
David Clement-Davies, Fell

Karen Pryor
“I griped about it at lunch one day to Bill Weist and Dr. Leslie Squier, our visiting psychologists from Reed College. I'd been trying to train one otter to stand on a box, I told them. No problem getting the behavior; as soon as I put the box in the enclosure, the otter rushed over and climbed on top of it. She quickly understood that getting on the box earned her a bite of fish, But. As soon as she got the picture, she began testing the parameters. 'Would you like me lying down on the box? What if I just put three feet on the box? Suppose I hang upside down from the edge of the box? Suppose I stand on it and look under it at the same time? How about if I put my front paws on it and bark?' For twenty minutes she offered me everything imaginable except just getting on the box and standing there. It was infuriating, and strangely exhausting. The otter would eat her fish and then run back to the box and present some new, fantastic variation and look at me expectantly (spitefully, even, I thought) while I struggled once more to decide if what she was doing fit my criteria or not.

My psychologist friends flatly refused to believe me; no animal acts like that. If you reinforce a response, you strengthen the chance that the animal will repeat what it was doing when it was reinforced; you don't precipitate some kind of guessing game.

So I showed them. We all went down to the otter tank, and I took the other otter and attempted to get it to swim through a small hoop. I put the hoop in the water. The otter swam through it, twice. I reinforced it. Fine. The psychologists nodded. Then the otter did the following, looking up for a reward each time: swam through the hoop and stopped, leaving its tail on the other side. Swam through and caught the hoop with a back foot in passing, and carried it away. Lay in the hoop. Bit the hoop Backed through the hoop. 'See?' I said. 'Otters are natural experimenters.”
Karen Pryor, Lads Before the Wind: Diary of a Dolphin Trainer

David Grann
“During Xtha-cka Zhi-ga The-the, the Killer of Flowers Moon. I will wade across the river of the blackfish, the otter, the beaver. I will climb the bank where the willow never dies.”
David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI