Nietzsche Quotes

Quotes tagged as "nietzsche" (showing 1-30 of 214)
Friedrich Nietzsche
“The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Viktor E. Frankl
“Those who have a 'why' to live, can bear with almost any 'how'.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Blessed are the forgetful, for they get the better even of their blunders.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“One must shed the bad taste of wanting to agree with many. "Good" is no longer good when one's neighbor mouths it. And how should there be a "common good"! The term contradicts itself: whatever can be common always has little value. In the end it must be as it is and always has been: great things remain for the great, abysses for the profound, nuances and shudders for the refined, and, in brief, all that is rare for the rare.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Friedrich Nietzsche
“One must be a sea, to receive a polluted stream without becoming impure.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Friedrich Nietzsche
“The worst readers are those who behave like plundering troops: they take away a few things they can use, dirty and confound the remainder, and revile the whole.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

John Fante
“Almighty God, I am sorry I am now an atheist, but have You read Nietzsche?”
John Fante, Ask the Dust

Friedrich Nietzsche
“When you stare into the abyss the abyss stares back at you.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

P.G. Wodehouse
“You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Carry on, Jeeves

Friedrich Nietzsche
“I obviously do everything to be "hard to understand" myself”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Friedrich Nietzsche
“If a man has character, he has also his typical experience, which always recurs.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Of all that is written, I love only what a person hath written with his blood. Write with blood, and thou wilt find that blood is spirit.
It is no easy task to understand unfamiliar blood; I hate the reading idlers.
He who knoweth the reader, doeth nothing more for the reader. Another century of readers--and spirit itself will stink.
Every one being allowed to learn to read, ruineth in the long run not only writing but also thinking.
Once spirit was God, then it became man, and now it even becometh populace.
He that writeth in blood and proverbs doth not want to be read, but learnt by heart.
In the mountains the shortest way is from peak to peak, but for that route thou must have long legs. Proverbs should be peaks, and those spoken to should be big and tall.
The atmosphere rare and pure, danger near and the spirit full of a joyful wickedness: thus are things well matched.
I want to have goblins about me, for I am courageous. The courage which scareth away ghosts, createth for itself goblins--it wanteth to laugh.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Friedrich Nietzsche
“The real world is much smaller than the imaginary”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“You desire to LIVE "according to Nature"? Oh, you noble Stoics, what fraud of words! Imagine to yourselves a being like Nature, boundlessly extravagant, boundlessly indifferent, without purpose or consideration, without pity or justice, at once fruitful and barren and uncertain: imagine to yourselves INDIFFERENCE as a power—how COULD you live in accordance with such indifference? To live—is not that just endeavouring to be otherwise than this Nature? Is not living valuing, preferring, being unjust, being limited, endeavouring to be different? And granted that your imperative, "living according to Nature," means actually the same as "living according to life"—how could you do DIFFERENTLY? Why should you make a principle out of what you yourselves are, and must be? In reality, however, it is quite otherwise with you: while you pretend to read with rapture the canon of your law in Nature, you want something quite the contrary, you extraordinary stage-players and self-deluders! In your pride you wish to dictate your morals and ideals to Nature, to Nature herself, and to incorporate them therein; you insist that it shall be Nature "according to the Stoa," and would like everything to be made after your own image, as a vast, eternal glorification and generalism of Stoicism! With all your love for truth, you have forced yourselves so long, so persistently, and with such hypnotic rigidity to see Nature FALSELY, that is to say, Stoically, that you are no longer able to see it otherwise—and to crown all, some unfathomable superciliousness gives you the Bedlamite hope that BECAUSE you are able to tyrannize over yourselves—Stoicism is self-tyranny—Nature will also allow herself to be tyrannized over: is not the Stoic a PART of Nature?... But this is an old and everlasting story: what happened in old times with the Stoics still happens today, as soon as ever a philosophy begins to believe in itself. It always creates the world in its own image; it cannot do otherwise; philosophy is this tyrannical impulse itself, the most spiritual Will to Power, the will to "creation of the world," the will to the causa prima.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Friedrich Nietzsche
“It is nobler to declare oneself wrong than to insist on being right --especially when one is right.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Everyone who has ever built anywhere a new heaven first found the power thereto in his own hell.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Cory Doctorow
“If you stare at someone long enough, they'll eventually look back at you.”
Cory Doctorow, Little Brother

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Physiologists should think before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength--life itself is will to power; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent results.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Friedrich Nietzsche
“One has to take a somewhat bold and dangerous line with this existence: especially as, whatever happens, we are bound to lose it.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Untimely Meditations

Friedrich Nietzsche
“To recognize untruth as a condition of life--that certainly means resisting accustomed value feelings in a dangerous way; and a philosophy that risks this would by that token alone place itself beyond good and evil.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Wilhelm Reich
“It is the fate of great achievements, born from a way of life that sets truth before security, to be gobbled up by you and excreted in the form of shit. For centuries great, brave, lonely men have been telling you what to do. Time and again you have corrupted, diminished and demolished their teachings; time and again you have been captivated by their weakest points, taken not the great truth, but some trifling error as your guiding principal. This, little man, is what you have done with Christianity, with the doctrine of sovereign people, with socialism, with everything you touch. Why, you ask, do you do this? I don't believe you really want an answer. When you hear the truth you'll cry bloody murder, or commit it. … You had your choice between soaring to superhuman heights with Nietzsche and sinking into subhuman depths with Hitler. You shouted Heil! Heil! and chose the subhuman. You had the choice between Lenin's truly democratic constitution and Stalin's dictatorship. You chose Stalin's dictatorship. You had your choice between Freud's elucidation of the sexual core of your psychic disorders and his theory of cultural adaptation. You dropped the theory of sexuality and chose his theory of cultural adaptation, which left you hanging in mid-air. You had your choice between Jesus and his majestic simplicity and Paul with his celibacy for priests and life-long compulsory marriage for yourself. You chose the celibacy and compulsory marriage and forgot the simplicity of Jesus' mother, who bore her child for love and love alone. You had your choice between Marx's insight into the productivity of your living labor power, which alone creates the value of commodities and the idea of the state. You forgot the living energy of your labor and chose the idea of the state. In the French Revolution, you had your choice between the cruel Robespierre and the great Danton. You chose cruelty and sent greatness and goodness to the guillotine. In Germany you had your choice between Goring and Himmler on the one hand and Liebknecht, Landau, and Muhsam on the other. You made Himmler your police chief and murdered your great friends. You had your choice between Julius Streicher and Walter Rathenau. You murdered Rathenau. You had your choice between Lodge and Wilson. You murdered Wilson. You had your choice between the cruel Inquisition and Galileo's truth. You tortured and humiliated the great Galileo, from whose inventions you are still benefiting, and now, in the twentieth century, you have brought the methods of the Inquisition to a new flowering. … Every one of your acts of smallness and meanness throws light on the boundless wretchedness of the human animal. 'Why so tragic?' you ask. 'Do you feel responsible for all evil?' With remarks like that you condemn yourself. If, little man among millions, you were to shoulder the barest fraction of your responsibility, the world would be a very different place. Your great friends wouldn't perish, struck down by your smallness.”
Wilhelm Reich, Listen, Little Man!

Michel Foucault
“Are you going to change yet again, shift your position according to the questions that are put to you, and say that the objections are not really directed at the place from which you are speaking? Are you going to declare yet again that you have never been what you have been reproached with being? Are you already preparing the way out that will enable you in your next book to spring up somewhere else and declare as you're now doing: no, no, I'm not where you are lying in wait for me, but over here, laughing at you?'
'What, do you imagine that I would take so much trouble and so much pleasure in writing, do you think that I would keep so persistently to my task, if I were not preparing – with a rather shaky hand – a labyrinth into which I can venture, into which I can move my discourse... in which I can lose myself and appear at last to eyes that I will never have to meet again. I am no doubt not the only one who writes in order to have no face. Do not ask who I am and do not ask me to remain the same: leave it to our bureaucrats and our police to see that our papers are in order. At least spare us their morality when we write.”
Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge & The Discourse on Language

Friedrich Nietzsche
“Truth is a mobile army of metaphors, metonyms, anthropomorphisms, in short a sum of human relations which have been subjected to poetic and rhetorical intensification, translation and decoration […]; truths are illusions of which we have forgotten that they are illusions, metaphors which have become worn by frequent use and have lost all sensuous vigour […]. Yet we still do not know where the drive to truth comes from, for so far we have only heard about the obligation to be truthful which society imposes in order to exist"


from, "On Truth and Lying in a Non-Moral Sense".”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“My genius is in my nostrils.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Index

Oran Kangas
“To paraphrase Nietzsche:
'That which doesn't kill us, sometimes makes us wish it had.”
Oran Kangas

Friedrich Nietzsche
“A nation is a detour of nature to arrive at five or six great men- yes, and then to get around them.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche
“It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of – namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious autobiography; and moreover that the moral (or immoral) purpose in every philosophy has constituted the true vital germ out of which the entire plant has always grown.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Friedrich Nietzsche
“The final reward of the dead - to die no more”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Walter Kaufmann
“No other German writer of comparable stature has been a more extreme critic of German nationalism than Nietzsche.”
Walter Kaufmann, On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo

Friedrich Nietzsche
“For this is how things are: the diminution and leveling of European man constitutes our greatest danger, for the sight of him makes us weary.—We can see nothing today that wants to grow greater, we suspect that things will continue to go down, down, to become thinner, more good-natured, more prudent, more comfortable, more mediocre, more indifferent, more Chinese, more Christian—there is no doubt that man is getting 'better' all the time.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo

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