Logotherapy Quotes

Quotes tagged as "logotherapy" Showing 1-30 of 37
Viktor E. Frankl
“Man is originally characterized by his "search for meaning" rather than his "search for himself." The more he forgets himself—giving himself to a cause or another person—the more human he is. And the more he is immersed and absorbed in something or someone other than himself the more he really becomes himself.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“Freedom, however, is not the last word. Freedom is only part of the story and half of the truth. Freedom is but the negative aspect of the whole phenomenon whose positive aspect is responsibleness. In fact, freedom is in danger of degenerating into mere arbitrariness unless it is lived in terms of responsibleness. That is why I recommend that the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast be supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the West Coast.”
Victor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“As each situation in life represents a challenge to man and presents a problem for him to solve, the question of the meaning of life may actually be reversed. Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather he must recognize that it is he who is asked. In a word, each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible. Thus, logotherapy sees in responsibleness the very essence of human existence.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“Suffering is intended to guard man from apathy, from psychic rigor mortis.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“If we were immortal, we could legitimately postpone every action forever. [...] But in the face of death as absolute finis to our future and boundary to our possibilities, we are under the imperative of utilizing our lifetimes to the utmost, not letting the singular opportunities - whose "finite" sum constitutes the whole of life - pass by unused.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[U]ntil his last breath no one can wrest from a man his freedom to take one or another attitude toward his destiny.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[T]he full gravity of the responsibility that every man bears throughout every moment of his life: the responsibility for what he will make of the next hour, for how he will shape the next day.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“For in every case man retains the freedom and the possibility of deciding for or against the influence of his surroundings.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

“[Viktor E. Frankl] joked that in contrast to Freud's and Adler's "depth psychology," which emphasizes delving into an individual's past and his or her unconscious instincts and desires, he practiced "height psychology," which focuses on a person's future and his or her conscious decisions and actions...His goal was to provoke people into realizing that they could and should exercise their capacity for choice to achieve their own goals.”
William J. Winslade, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“If all men were perfect, then every individual would be replaceable by anyone else. From the very imperfection of men follows the indispensability and inexchangeability of each individual; for each is imperfect in his own fashion.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“To escape into the mass is to disburden oneself of individual responsibility. As soon as someone acts as if her were a mere part of the whole, and as if only this whole counts, he can enjoy the sensation of throwing off some of the burden of his responsibility. This tendency to flee from responsibility is the motif of all collectivism. True community is in essence the community of of responsible persons; mere mass is the sum of depersonalized entities.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“Freedom is not something we "have" and therefore can lose; freedom is what we "are.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[T]he symptom is never merely a consequence of some somatic factor and the expression of some psychic factor, but is also a mode of existence - and this last element is the crucial one.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“Insofar as a sacrifice is "calculated," performed after careful reckoning of the prospects of its bringing about a desired end, it loses all ethical significance. Real sacrifice occurs only when we run the risk of having sacrificed in vein. Would anyone maintain that a person who plunges into the water to save someone has acted less ethically, or unethically, because both are drowned?”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“Work usually represents the area in which the individual's uniqueness stands in relation to society and thus acquires meaning and value. This meaning and value, however, is attached to the person's work as a contribution to society, not to the actual occupation as such. [...]
If there are cases where the actual occupation does not allow a sense of fulfillment to arise, the fault is in the person, not in the work. The work itself does not make the person indispensable and irreplaceable; it only gives him the chance to be so.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“To explain everything as the result of a single factor which, moreover, is fixed by fate, has a great advantage. For then no task seems to be assigned to one; one has nothing to do but wait for the imaginary moment when the curing of this one factor will cure everything else.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“Not every conflict is necessarily neurotic; some amount of conflict is normal and healthy. In a similar sense suffering is not always a pathological phenomenon; rather than being a symptom of neurosis, suffering may well be a human achievement, especially if the suffering grows out of existential frustration. I would strictly deny that one's search or a meaning to his existence, or even his doubt of it, in every case is derived from, or results in, any disease. Existential frustration is neither pathological or pathogenic. A man's concern, even his despair, over the worthwhileness of life is an existential distress but by no means a mental disease. it may well be that interpreting the first in terms of the latter motivates a doctor to bury his patient's existential despair under a heap of tranquilizing drugs. It is his task, rather, to pilot the patient through his existential crises of growth and development.

Logotherapy regards its assignment as that of assisting the patient to find meaning in his life. Inasmuch as logotherapy makes him aware of the hidden logos of his existence, it is an analytical process. To this extent, logotherapy resembles psychoanalysis. However, in logotherapy's attempt to make something conscious again it does not restrict its activity to instinctual facts within the individual's unconscious bu also cares for existential realities, such as the potential meaning of his existence to be fulfilled as well as his will to meaning. Any analysis, however, even when it refrains from including the noological dimension in its therapeutic process, tries to make the patient aware of what he actually longs for in the depth of his being. Logotherapy deviates from psychoanalysis insofar as it considers man a being whose main concern consists in fulfilling a meaning, rather than in the mere gratification and satisfaction of drives and instincts, or in merely reconciling the conflict claims of id, ego and supergo, or in the mere adaptation and adjustment to society and environment.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“Love is living the experience of another person in all his uniqueness and singularity.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“To compare yourself with anyone else is to do an injustice either to yourself or to the other person. [...] For everyone has a different kind of start. But the person whose start was more difficult , whose fate was less kind, can be credited with the greater personal achievement, other things being equal. Since, however, all aspects of the situation imposed by fate can never be assessed, there is simply no basis and no standard for a comparison of achievements.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“To compare yourself with anyone else is to do an injustice either to yourself or to the other person. [...] For everyone has a different kind of start. But the person whose start was more difficult, whose fate was less kind, can be credited with the greater personal achievement, other things being equal. Since, however, all aspects of the situation imposed by fate can never be assessed, there is simply no basis and no standard for a comparison of achievements.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[E]very human task is an "eternal" one and human progress is endless, an advance into infinity, toward a goal located in infinity. And even then it is a matter only of each individual's progress in his own personal history.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[T]o ask the meaning of existence is meaningless in that existence precedes meaning. For the existence of meaning is assumed when we question the meaning of existence. Existence is, so to speak, the wall we are backed up against whenever we question it.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“While we were waiting for the shower, our nakedness was brought home to us: we really had nothing now except our bare bodies—even minus hair; all we possessed, literally, was our naked existence”
Victor Frankl

Viktor E. Frankl
“Logotherapy tries to make the patient fully aware of his own responsibleness; therefore, it must leave to him the option for what, to what, or to whom he understands himself to be responsible. That is why a logotherapist is the least tempted of all psychotherapists to impose value judgments on his patients, for he will never permit the patient to pass to the doctor the responsibility of judging.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“A statement once made by Edith Weisskopf-Joelson: "Although traditional psychotherapy has insisted that therapeutic practices have to be based on findings on etiology, it is possible that certain factors might cause neuroses during early childhood and that entirely different factors might relieve neuroses during adulthood.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl
“[P]leasure belongs to the category of events which cannot be brought about by direct intention; on the contrary, it is a mere side effect or by-product. Therefore the more one strives for pleasure, the less one is able to attain it.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“[T]he task of existential analysis consists precisely in bringing the individual to the point where he can of his own accord discern his own proper tasks, out of the consciousness of his own responsibility, and can find the clear, no longer indeterminate, unique and singular meaning of his own life.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“All psychotherapy is ultimately something of an art. There is always an irrational element in psychotherapy. The doctor's artistic intuition and sensitivity is of considerable importance. The patient, too, brings an irrational element into the relationship: his individuality.”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Viktor E. Frankl
“Medical ministry belongs in the work of every physician. The surgeon should have recourse to it as much and as often as the neurologist or psychiatrist. It is only that the goal of medical ministry is different and goes deeper that that of the surgeon. When the surgeon has completed an amputation, he takes off his rubber gloves and appears to have done his duty as a physician. But if the patient then commits suicide because he cannot bear living as a cripple - of what use has the surgical therapy been? Is it not also part of the physician's work to do something about the patient's attitude toward the pain of surgery or the handicap that results from it?”
Viktor E. Frankl, The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy

Stephen R. Covey
“many so-called mental and emotional illnesses are really symptoms of an underlying sense of meaninglessness or emptiness.”
Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Personal Workbook

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