Haymitch Quotes

Quotes tagged as "haymitch" Showing 1-30 of 30
“So it's you and a syringe against the Capitol? See, this is why no one lets you make the plans.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“You're punishing him over and over for things that are out of his control. Now, I'm not saying you shouldn't have a fully loaded weapon next to you round the clock. But I think it's time you flipped this little scenario in your head. If you'd been taken by the Capitol, and hijacked, and then tried to kill Peeta, is this the way he would be treating you?" demands Haymitch.
I fall silent. It isn't. It isn't how he would be treating me at all. He would be trying to get me back at any cost. Not shutting me out, abandoning me, greeting me with hostility at every turn.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“In the end, the only person I truly want to comfort me is Haymitch, because he loves Peeta, too.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“While I was waiting...I ate your lunch.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“Not like this. He wanted it to be real.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“I think of the snarling, cruel exchange back on the hovercraft. The bitterness that followed. But all I say is "I can't believe you didn't rescue Peeta."
"I know," he replies.
There's a sense of incompleteness. And not because he hasn't apologized. But because we were a team. We had a deal to keep Peeta safe. A drunken, unrealistic deal made in the dark of night, but a deal just the same. And in my heart of hearts, I know we both failed.
"Now you say it," I tell him.
"I can't believe you let him out of your sight that night," says Haymitch.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“A furious Peeta hammers Haymitch with the atrocity he could become party to, but I can feel Haymitch watching me. This is the moment, then. When we find out exactly just how alike we are, and how much he truly understands me.
"I'm with the Mockingjay," he says.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“Finally, the intercom crackles and Hatmitch's acerbic laugh fills the studio. He contains himself just long enough to say, 'And that, my friends, is how a revolution dies.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“Great. Now I have to go back and tell Haymitch I want an eighty-year-old and Nuts and Volts for my allies. He'll love that.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“Shame isn't a strong enough word for what I feel.
"You could live a hundred lifetimes and not deserve him, you know," Haymitch says.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“He wants as many victors as possible for the cameras to follow in the Capitol. Thinks it makes for better television."

"Are you and Beetee going?" I ask.

"As many young and attractive victors as possible," Haymitch corrects himself. "So, no. We'll be here.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“I thought he wanted it, anyway," I say.
"Not like this," Haymitch says. "He wanted it to be real.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“Here's some advice. Stay alive," says Haymitch, and then bursts out laughing. I exchange a look with Peeta before I remember that I'm having nothing more to do with him. I'm surprised to see the hardness in his eyes. He generally seems so mild.
'That's very funny,' says Peeta. Suddenly, he lashes out at the glass in Haymitch's hand. It shatters on the floor, sending the bloodred liquid running toward the back of the train. 'Only not to us.'
Haymitch considers this a moment, then punches Peeta in the jaw, knocking him from his chair. When he turns back to reach for the spirits, I drive my knife into the table between his hand and the bottle, barely missing his fingers. I brace myself to deflect his hit, but it doesn't come. Instead, he sits back and squints at us.
'Well, what's this?' says Haymitch. 'Did I actually get a pair of fighters this year?”
Suzanne Collins

“I know we promised Haymitch, we'd do exactly what they said, but I don't think he considered this angle.'
'Where is Haymitch, anyway? Isn't he supposed to protect us from this sort of thing?' says Peeta.
'With all that alcohol in him, it's probably not advisable to have him around an open flame,' I say.”
Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

“Something flickers across his bloodshot eyes. Pain.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“People of Panem, we fight, we dare, we end our hunger for justice!” There‘s dead silence on the set. It goes on. And on. Finally, the intercom crackles and Haymitch‘s acerbic laugh fills the studio. He contains himself just long enough to say, “And that, my friends, is how a revolution dies.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“Listen up. You're in trouble. Word is the Capitol's furious about you showing them up in the arena. The one thing they can't stand is being laughed at and they're the joke of Panem”
Suzanne Collins

“I know. I was hoping," I say.
"Exactly. Because you're desperate," says Haymitch.
I don't argue because, of course, he's right.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“I don't know what I expected from my first meeting with Peeta after the announcement. A few hugs and kisses. A little comfort maybe. Not this. I turn to Haymitch. "Don't worry, I'll get you more liquor.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“I don't like self-righteous people," I say.

"What's to like?" says Haymitch, who begins sucking the dregs out of the empty bottles.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“He hates me more," says Peeta. "I don't think people in general are his sort of thing.”
Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

“So it's you and a syringe against the Capitol.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“He could have had his choice of any woman in the district. And he chose solitude. Not solitude – that sounds too peaceful. More like solitary confinement.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“Haymitch isn't thinking of arenas, but something else. "Johanna's back in the hospital."
I assumed Johanna was fine, had passed her exam, but simply wasn't assigned to a sharp shooters' unit. She's wicked with a throwing axe but about average with a gun. "Is she hurt? What happened?"
"It was while she was on the Block. They try to ferret out a soldier's potential weakness. So they flooded the street, " says Haymitch.
This doesn't help. Johanna can swim. At least, I seem to remember her swimming around some in the Quarter Quell. Not like Finnick, of course, but none of us are like Finnick. "So?"
"That's how they tortured her in the Capitol. Soaked her then used electric shocks," says Haymitch. "In the Block, she had some kind of flashback. Panicked, didn't know where she was. She's back under sedation."
Finnick and I just stand there as if we've lost the ability to respond.
I think of the way Johanna never showers. How she forced herself into the rain like it was acid that day. I had attributed her misery to morphling withdrawal.
"You two should go see her. You're as close to friends as she's got," says Haymitch.
That makes the whole thing worse. I don't really know what's between Johanna and Finnick, but I hardly know her. No family. No friends.Not so much as a token from District 7 to set beside her regulation clothes in her anonymous drawer.
Nothing.”
Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

“You call that a kiss?”
Haymitch Abernathy-"The Hunger Games'

“My death could, in fact, save him.

If it can't, no matter. It's enough to die of spite. To punish Haymitch, who, of all the people in this rotting world, has turned Peeta and me into pieces in his Games. I trusted him. I put what was precious in Haymitch's hands. And he has betrayed me.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

“But in my head I can hear Haymitch's smug, if slightly exasperated, words: "Yes, that's what I'm looking for, sweetheart.”
Suzanne Collins

“But there's nothing up there but the wounded!" I say. "Katniss" I hear the warning note in Haymitch's voice and know what's coming. Don't you even think about-!" I yank the earpiece free and let it hang from its wire.”
Suzanne Collins

“Remember who the real enemy is.”
Susanne Collins

“I nod, then let the conversation drop. But secretly I'm wondering if Haymitch sobered up long enough to help Peeta and me because he thought we just might have the wits to survive. Maybe he wasn't always a drunk. Maybe, in the beginning, he tried to help the tributes. But then it got unbearable. It must be hell to mentor two kids and then watch them die. Year after year after year. I realize that if I get out of here, that will become my job. To mentor the girl from District 12. The idea is so repellent, I thrust it from my mind.”
Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games