1952 Quotes

Quotes tagged as "1952" Showing 1-6 of 6
Allen Ginsberg
“The Wisdom of Solomon (Carl)

They censor words not the things they denote:
It would create less of a stir to drop a piece of shit on Grant's tomb
than to write it out in white paint.
Because people recognize that's what memorials are for–old bums & dogs to shit on.”
Allen Ginsberg, Journals: Early Fifties, Early Sixties

Albert Einstein
“The [quantum] theory reminds me a little of the system of delusions of an exceedingly intelligent paranoiac.”
Albert Einstein

“Today's cheerful note: The atomic bomb can't kill you more times than you're already going to die already.”
The Index-Journal

“No doubt you will be delighted to hear from an adept who has undertaken the operation of his H.G.A. in accord with our traditions.

The operation began auspiciously with a chromatic display of psychosomatic symptoms, and progressed rapidly to acute psychosis. The operator has alternated satisfactorily between manic hysteria and depressing melancholy stupor on approximately 40 cycles, and satisfactory progress has been maintained in social ostracism, economic collapses and mental disassociation.

These statements are mentioned not in any vainglorious spirit of conceit, but rather that they may serve as comfort and inspiration to other aspirants on the Path.

Now I'm off to the wilds of Mexico for a period, also in pursuit of the elusive H.G.A. before winding up in the guard finally via the booby hotels, the graveyard, or—? If the final, you can tell all the little Practicuses that I wouldn't have missed it for anything.

—No one. Once called 210”
Jack Whiteside Parsons, Sex and Rockets: The Occult World of Jack Parsons

“Honest dissent and unorthodox ideas often promote scientific knowledge. Even though more often wrong than right, unorthodox ideas are apt to stimulate some clear thinking among the orthodox. And from time to time, a doubter makes a basic discovery. But the lysenkoism is quite sterile of ideas and of suggestions for new experiments. It urges a retreat to archaic views, long abandoned with sufficient reason. In this, the lysenkoism is comparable only to the anti-evolutionism in the USA. New arguments and new facts mean just as little to the lysenkoists as they do to the anti-evolutionists.”
Theodosius Dobzhansky, The Pseudoscience Wars: Immanuel Velikovsky and the Birth of the Modern Fringe

Lysenkoism may be useful only because it provides a lesson. Whether we like it or not, the days of the independent scientist and of independent science are about over. The more important science becomes in the lives of individuals and of nations, the more it will need popular support and will have to submit to social control. But the forms and techniques of this support and control have not yet been devised and tested. The problem is a new one. The Soviet rulers have tried a solution, but their solution has resulted in lysenkoism, and thus proved to be a dismal failure.”
Theodosius Dobzhansky, The Pseudoscience Wars: Immanuel Velikovsky and the Birth of the Modern Fringe