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  • #1
    Gertrude Stein
    “Eating and sleeping are not like loving and breathing. Washing is not like eating and sleeping. Believing is like breathing and loving. Religion can be believing, it can be like breathing, it can be like loving, it can be like eating or sleeping, it can be like washing, it can be something to fill up a place when someone has lost out of them a piece that it was not natural for them to have in them.”
    Gertrude Stein

  • #2
    G.K. Chesterton
    “In the specially Christian case we have to react against the heavy bias of fatigue. It is almost impossible to make the facts vivid, because the facts are familiar; and for fallen men it is often true that familiarity is fatigue. I am convinced that if we could tell the supernatural story of Christ word for word as of a Chinese hero, call him the Son of Heaven instead of the Son of God, and trace his rayed nimbus in the gold thread of Chinese embroideries or the gold lacquer of Chinese pottery, instead of in the gold leaf of our own old Catholic paintings, there would be a unanimous testimony to the spiritual purity of the story. We should hear nothing then of the injustice of substitution or the illogicality of atonement, of the superstitious exaggeration of the burden of sin or the impossible insolence of an invasion of the laws of nature. We should admire the chivalry of the Chinese conception of a god who fell from the sky to fight the dragons and save the wicked from being devoured by their own fault and folly. We should admire the subtlety of the Chinese view of life, which perceives that all human imperfection is in very truth a crying imperfection. We should admire the Chinese esoteric and superior wisdom, which said there are higher cosmic laws than the laws we know.”
    G.K. Chesterton, The Everlasting Man

  • #3
    Jane Austen
    “You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #4
    Robin Jarvis
    “We are happy to observe an increasing frequency of these pedestrian tours: to walk, is, beyond all comparison, the most independent and advantageous mode of travelling; Smelfungus and Mundungus may pursue their journey as they please; but it grieves one to see a man of taste at the mercy of a postilion.'

    For the 'man of taste' to be actively recommended the pedestrian alternative indeed shows that a decisive reversal of educated attitudes has taken place, and within a relatively narrow span of years.”
    Robin Jarvis, Romantic Writing and Pedestrian Travel

  • #6
    Edmund Burke
    “Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could do only a little.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #7
    Edmund Burke
    “Rudeness is the weak man’s imitation of strength.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #8
    Edmund Burke
    “Our patience will achieve more than our force.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #9
    Edmund Burke
    “Never despair, but if you do, work on in despair.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #10
    Edmund Burke
    “Never apologise for showing feeling. When you do so, you apologise for the truth.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #11
    Edmund Burke
    “It is a general popular error to imagine the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.”
    Edmund Burke

  • #12
    Frederick Buechner
    “To be commanded to love God at all, let alone in the wilderness, is like being commanded to be well when we are sick, to sing for joy when we are dying of thirst, to run when our legs are broken. But this is the first and great commandment nonetheless. Even in the wilderness - especially in the wilderness - you shall love him.”
    Frederick Buechner, A Room Called Remember: Uncollected Pieces

  • #13
    Wallace Stegner
    “Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed ... We simply need that wild country available to us, even if we never do more than drive to its edge and look in.”
    Wallace Stegner, The Sound of Mountain Water

  • #14
    John Muir
    “Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity”
    John Muir, Our National Parks

  • #15
    Laura Ingalls Wilder
    “There is no comfort anywhere for anyone who dreads to go home.”
    Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little Town on the Prairie

  • #16
    Cheryl Strayed
    “It had nothing to do with gear or footwear or the backpacking fads or philosophies of any particular era or even with getting from point A to point B.

    It had to do with how it felt to be in the wild. With what it was like to walk for miles with no reason other than to witness the accumulation of trees and meadows, mountains and deserts, streams and rocks, rivers and grasses, sunrises and sunsets. The experience was powerful and fundamental. It seemed to me that it had always felt like this to be a human in the wild, and as long as the wild existed it would always feel this way.”
    Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

  • #17
    “Remember me with smiles and laughter, for that is how I will remember you all. If you can only remember me with tears, then don't remember me at all.”
    Michael Landon

  • #18
    “The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellness.

    We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

    We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

    We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.

    These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships.

    These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom. A time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete...

    Remember, to spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to be around forever. Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that little person soon will grow up and leave your side.

    Remember, to give a warm hug to the one next to you, because that is the only treasure you can give with your heart and it doesn't cost a cent.

    Remember, to say, "I love you" to your partner and your loved ones, but most of all mean it. A kiss and an embrace will mend hurt when it comes from deep inside of you.

    Remember to hold hands and cherish the moment for someday that person might not be there again. Give time to love, give time to speak! And give time to share the precious thoughts in your mind.”
    Bob Moorehead, Words Aptly Spoken

  • #19
    Flannery O'Connor
    “All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful.”
    Flannery O'Connor, The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor

  • #20
    Flannery O'Connor
    “To expect too much is to have a sentimental view of life and this is a softness that ends in bitterness.”
    Flannery O'Connor

  • #21
    Socrates
    “To find yourself, think for yourself.”
    Socrates

  • #22
    Ani DiFranco
    “I know there is strength in the differences between us. I know there is comfort, where we overlap.”
    Ani DiFranco

  • #23
    Ani DiFranco
    “Taken out of context, I must seem so strange”
    Ani DiFranco, Ani DiFranco: Verses

  • #24
    T.H. White
    “The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn.”
    T.H. White, The Once and Future King

  • #25
    Jim Henson
    “[Kids] don't remember what you try to teach them. They remember what you are.”
    Jim Henson, It's Not Easy Being Green: And Other Things to Consider

  • #26
    Haim G. Ginott
    “I’ve come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my personal approach that creates the climate. It’s my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized.”
    Haim Ginott

  • #27
    Stephen Fry
    “The biggest challenge facing the great teachers and communicators of history is not to teach history itself, nor even the lessons of history, but why history matters. How to ignite the first spark of the will o'the wisp, the Jack o'lantern, the ignis fatuus [foolish fire] beloved of poets, which lights up one source of history and then another, zigzagging across the marsh, connecting and linking and writing bright words across the dark face of the present. There's no phrase I can come up that will encapsulate in a winning sound-bite why history matters. We know that history matters, we know that it is thrilling, absorbing, fascinating, delightful and infuriating, that it is life. Yet I can't help wondering if it's a bit like being a Wagnerite; you just have to get used to the fact that some people are never going to listen.”
    Stephen Fry, Making History

  • #28
    Phillip Done
    “The main reason I became a teacher is that I like being the first one to introduce kids to words and music and people and numbers and concepts and idea that they have never heard about or thought about before. I like being the first one to tell them about Long John Silver and negative numbers and Beethoven and alliteration and "Oh, What a Beautiful Morning" and similes and right angles and Ebenezer Scrooge. . . Just think about what you know today. You read. You write. You work with numbers. You solve problems. We take all these things for granted. But of course you haven't always read. You haven't always known how to write. You weren't born knowing how to subtract 199 from 600. Someone showed you. There was a moment when you moved from not knowing to knowing, from not understanding to understanding. That's why I became a teacher.”
    Phillip Done, 32 Third Graders and One Class Bunny: Life Lessons from Teaching

  • #29
    Peter F. Drucker
    “No one learns as much about a subject as one who is forced to teach it.”
    Peter Drucker

  • #30
    Lee Iacocca
    “In a completely rational society, the best of us would be teachers and the rest of us would have to settle for something else.”
    Lee Iacocca

  • #31
    Fulton J. Sheen
    “A teacher who cannot explain any abstract subject to a child does not himself thoroughly understand his subject; if he does not attempt to break down his knowledge to fit the child's mind, he does not understand teaching.”
    Fulton J. Sheen, Life is Worth Living



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