The New Books (By Genre) You're Reading Now

Posted by Cybil on March 31, 2017


We are a fourth of the way through 2017! How's your Goodreads Reading Challenge coming along?

More than 1.7 million of your fellow readers set personal reading goals for the year, pledging to collectively read more than 79.6 million books. With more than 10 million books already marked as 'completed' in the 2017 Reading Challenge, we were curious to see which new books were being most read so far this year.

We looked through our data to determine the most-read new releases across some of your favorite genres, including mystery, nonfiction, fantasy, YA, and romance. If you're feeling inspired, add some of these reads to your Want to Read list!

Of course, remember the Reading Challenge is fun. FUN! There's no need to stress out if you feel like you're falling behind. And you can adjust your goal throughout the year. Plus, give yourself proper credit. If you're curling up with long, literary classics, account for the time you'll need and downsize your goal. We also have some suggested short reading, if you'd like to add these to your list.

Top New Fiction in the Reading Challenge:
Lincoln in the Bardo
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My Not So Perfect Life
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Difficult Women
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The Sleepwalker
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Top New Mystery in the Reading Challenge:
Behind Her Eyes
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The Girl Before
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The Night Bird
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Echoes in Death
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Top New YA in the Reading Challenge:
Caraval
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King's Cage
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Carve the Mark
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By Your Side
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Top New Nonfiction in the Reading Challenge:
The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story
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How to Murder Your Life
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The Stranger in the Woods
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Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America
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Top New Fantasy in the Reading Challenge:
Norse Mythology
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The Bear and the Nightingale
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A Conjuring of Light
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Silence Fallen
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Top New Science Fiction in the Reading Challenge:
All Our Wrong Todays
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The Collapsing Empire
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Fake Fiancee
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The Stars Are Legion
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Top New Romance in the Reading Challenge:
Egomaniac
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Mack Daddy

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Anything You Can Do

Check out more recent blogs:
Catch Up with These Series Before the Next Book Comes Out
Goodreads Hack: Are You 'Reading' Compatible with Your Friends?
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves This Week



Enjoy a year of great books with the Goodreads 2017 Reading Challenge. Set your reading goal and keep track of your progress throughout the year!

Comments Showing 1-50 of 105 (105 new)


message 1: by Linnea (new)

Linnea I was at the bookstore today to buy the new Neil Gaiman book. It was sold out. I got other books instead. Now I have to wait until I have money again to buy the book :D


message 2: by Anissa (new)

Anissa Good job, Goodreads! :) Thx for breaking it down by some genres to give us a more comprehensive look at what new is being read most at the moment for the Challenge. For new Science Fiction, I've got New York 2140 & Seven Surrenders on my list for 2017.


message 3: by Phoenix2 (new)

Phoenix2 Most of the YA are-were on my to read list ha ha ^.^


message 4: by Reading Faerie (new)

Reading Faerie I think I'll give the fantasy a look-see. Some of them sound interesting.


Zombieslayer/Alienhunter {quester in a cashier's body} I have two 2017 releases (Wintersong and The Last Harvest) on my TBR for this year :D
Boy, newer books are expensive ^^"


message 6: by Donna (new)

Donna Bijas Reading Faerie wrote: "I think I'll give the fantasy a look-see. Some of them sound interesting."
I read the Bear and The Nightingale. It was excellent.


message 7: by MD (new)

MD What about science fiction?


message 8: by Amber (new)

Amber Martingale Good question, MD.


Nikki ~ The Nocturnal Bookworm MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

I was wondering the same thing


message 10: by Charlie (new)

Charlie Love They should do a "Most Reread Books This Year" type of thing. I'd be really interested to see which books people reread the most. For me it would be Harry Potter... all seven of them (Cursed Child doesn't count).


message 11: by Cybil (new)

Cybil Charlie wrote: "They should do a "Most Reread Books This Year" type of thing. I'd be really interested to see which books people reread the most. For me it would be Harry Potter... all seven of them (Cursed Child ..."
Here's a recent blog on that topic: https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/8...


message 12: by Anissa (last edited Mar 31, 2017 02:05PM) (new)

Anissa MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

I'm thinking it's not as much a "favorite" genre of GR users as those they've featured.

I mentioned lack of Scifi in their post of a couple days ago where they featured the top books people were adding to their 2017 Challenge & it was YA & Romance heavy (which is rightly reflective of what highly trends with many Goodreads users). Today's post seems a response to the overall expression in that blog post's comments that breaking it out to more genres would be more useful to many users (non-fiction was sorely missed on that post by some).

Perhaps Science Fiction will get its own feature at some point. I certainly know there are a good number of Scifi titles released each month so it's not like there's a dearth of publications in the "new" category for 2017. In the meantime, there's no stopping any of us from saying what we are reading for the 2017 Challenge that's new in Science Fiction.


message 13: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse For some reason, I found this breakdown much more interesting than the one a few days ago...which means adding more to-reads to my already overfull to-read list.

I have a theory that GR is heavily slanted demographically to the under 30 set and that they don't read as much sci-fi as we older geezers do/did. (Now I wonder what the "typical" Goodreader profile is? Have they crunched those numbers yet?)


message 14: by Catherine (new)

Catherine I have a few of these on my tbr list....and many more as well!! My list is out of control!! :)


message 15: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Anissa wrote: "MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

I'm thinking it's not as much a "favorite" genre of GR users as those they've featured.

I mentioned lack of Scifi in their post of a couple days ago where ..."


They are missing historucal & historical romance as well... i read a lot of those!


message 16: by Cybil (new)

Cybil MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

Excellent point! I added them in for you. Thank you!


message 17: by Superbambi (new)

Superbambi I enjoy this breakdown so much more than the one in the previous post... At least this way there's something for everyone.

And thank Merlin Goodreads didn't give in to the folks who wanted to break it down by gender (which is dumb, because you know, not everyone wants to choose between male and female, nor should they be made to, and it's not like gender's any indication of people's reading tastes). So thanks for that.


message 18: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Cybil wrote: "MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

Excellent point! I added them in for you. Thank you!"


What about historical fiction?


message 19: by MD (new)

MD Cybil wrote: "MD wrote: "What about science fiction?"

Excellent point! I added them in for you. Thank you!"


Thank you!!


message 20: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Thanks for the non fiction! :D


message 21: by Reading Faerie (new)

Reading Faerie Cybil wrote: "Charlie wrote: "They should do a "Most Reread Books This Year" type of thing. I'd be really interested to see which books people reread the most. For me it would be Harry Potter... all seven of the..."

Yes, that would be interesting, too. :)


message 22: by Nono (new)

Nono Nothing from the Horror section...!?


message 23: by Charlie (new)

Charlie Love Cybil wrote: "Charlie wrote: "They should do a "Most Reread Books This Year" type of thing. I'd be really interested to see which books people reread the most. For me it would be Harry Potter... all seven of the..."

Thank you! I must have missed that blog. And I'm so happy that all of the Harry Potter books are on there (even Cursed Child).


message 24: by Beverly (new)

Beverly Linnea wrote: "I was at the bookstore today to buy the new Neil Gaiman book. It was sold out. I got other books instead. Now I have to wait until I have money again to buy the book :D"

Try the library. Most have digital borrowing alzo.


message 25: by Amber (new)

Amber Martingale Libraries are ALSO useful if you want to preview a book before deciding if you want to spend your money on a book.


message 26: by Cal (new)

Cal (Constant Raving Reviews) Anissa wrote: "Good job, Goodreads! :) Thx for breaking it down by some genres to give us a more comprehensive look at what new is being read most at the moment for the Challenge. For new Science Fiction, I've go..."

I agree- thank you, GR!! :)


message 27: by Cal (new)

Cal (Constant Raving Reviews) Amber wrote: "Libraries are ALSO useful if you want to preview a book before deciding if you want to spend your money on a book."

Agreed! Thank goodness for libraries! :)


message 28: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  Humran thank you Amber , but how to manage Libraries .


message 29: by Franchesca (last edited Apr 06, 2017 06:27AM) (new)

Franchesca Tedaldi Barba Yes Amber, I do it all the time.


message 30: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  Humran YES OF COURSE BUT HOW


message 31: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Hey, guys? She may not live in North America. Not every country has free public libraries.

Even in the US, there are areas that don't have libraries nearby. I can think of two very rural areas that depend on a once-a-month bookmobile (and they are in danger of losing even that due to budget cuts.)


message 32: by Franchesca (new)

Franchesca Tedaldi Barba I live in NYC and all our libraries are free.


message 33: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones Some libraries have ebooks though, so you don't have to live close by.


message 34: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Franchesca wrote: "I live in NYC and all our libraries are free."

NYC has everything. :)
Have you read Patience and Fortitude, which is about the (aborted) attempt to gut the main NYC library? It's fascinating...and really infuriating.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

I tutored ESL for our library system for a couple of years. One of the first things I did was take the students on a tour of the library because we had a lot of language resources, including bilingual books. Every semester, I had at least two or three students who didn't believe me when I told them they would not have to pay to use the library. Even when we explained it in their native language, some didn't believe us!


message 35: by Camille (new)

Camille Linnea wrote: "I was at the bookstore today to buy the new Neil Gaiman book. It was sold out. I got other books instead. Now I have to wait until I have money again to buy the book :D"


message 36: by Camille (new)

Camille I've saved so much money since I started using the public library. Try it. You put your name on a list for a new hot book and they call you when it's available to you .


message 37: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones Camille wrote: "I've saved so much money since I started using the public library. Try it. You put your name on a list for a new hot book and they call you when it's available to you ."
For me, what's saved me a ton is my local library starting to carry ebooks. I always end up with fines if I check out regular books. Between that and my kindle unlimited, I now only spend about $10 most months. Sometimes, I do splurge and pick up something that I can't bring myself to wait for the library to pick up or something that I don't want to have to give back but usually it's only $10 lol.


message 38: by Beverly (new)

Beverly Tiffany wrote: "Some libraries have ebooks though, so you don't have to live close by."

I couldn't imagine not living in a place that doesn't have a free library. I would think that every county of a state would have some kind if library or access digital books.


message 39: by Amber (new)

Amber Martingale Yaaresse wrote: "Hey, guys? She may not live in North America. Not every country has free public libraries.

Even in the US, there are areas that don't have libraries nearby. I can think of two very rural areas th..."


Belleville, Illinois has one public library with TWO branches and I live closest to the main branch. I think Mohammed was asking me if I manage the library here and I have to tell him: No, I do not.

Franchesca: The Belleville Public Library is free to all residents of Belleville. Residents of nearby towns that do NOT have a library can purchase a BPL card for $65

Tiffany: E-books are NOT REAL BOOKS. I'm only gonna say it once. A real book is a tangible object that has a weight, a feel as the pages turn and a smell...usually of ink, or in the case of older books, dust.

Camille: I've done that too though they usually only call me if I have to request a copy from out state. Otherwise, I get an email.

Beverly: That would be a common sense idea and humanity in general, but Americans specifically, ABHOR anything that reeks of common sense the way folklore, Bram Stoker and Anne Rice tell us that vampires should abhor sunlight, running water, stakes, crosses/crucifixes, silver, garlic and ROSE BUSHES.


message 40: by Franchesca (new)

Franchesca Tedaldi Barba I have never heard of the book patients and fortitude but I will put it on my list. Thanks. The idea of closing the NYC library would kill me. I don't use that main library, it's out of my neighborhood, so I wait for ebooks etc..I would be destitute if I had to pay for books. They are my passion. This is the first time I've learned that libraries charge for their rentals.


message 41: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones I don't have the storage room for all the books that I read for one thing. Also, since my work schedule doesn't really work with the schedule the library hours, I take what I can get. Also, as I said before it saves me the library fines.


message 42: by Yaaresse (last edited Apr 06, 2017 02:59PM) (new)

Yaaresse Amber, I meant that the person (Lianne?) who wanted to purchase the book and could not might not live in the US or have access to a library. She might, she might not. We don't know.

Franchesca, I hope you find the book interesting. Apparently, the reporter uncovered plans to close or downsize numerous branches. it was a complete fiasco. Those involved definitely underestimated the citizens of NYC!

I depend on ebooks as well, although for a different reason than most people. The invention of ebooks has been a godsend to anyone who cannot hold books or read regular print. Our county librarians now go to senor centers (where the patients are often bed-bound) and teach them to use e-readers and how to check out books online. You should some of those folks' faces light up when they realize the range of books available to them and that they no longer have to depend on someone else to either bring them reading material or read the tiny print to them. Once they get the hang of it, they can burn through some reading material. Ebooks = Best thing since sliced bread!

We're lucky in the US to have a vast network of free public libraries. I guess we can thank Ben Franklin for that. :) I don't begrudge a single penny of the my county tax bill.


message 43: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones Yaaresse wrote: "Amber, I mean that the person who wanted to purchase the book and could not might possibly not live in the US or have access to a library. She might, she might not. We don't know.

Franchesca, I h..."


That is so cool that they do that for the patients at the senior centers! I think I'll suggest this for our local library, if they don't already!! I do love being able to get the new book at the touch of a button. When ebooks first came out, I was very skeptical. I thought I'd miss the feel (and smell) of the book in my hands. And, to be honest, sometimes I do. But, I've gotten spoiled, I hate waiting until the library or book store opens. For now, it was in the best interest of my family that we downsize as far as available space. So, storing the book series that I love isn't possible unless I only want to read those books (ummmmm...no lol). I love that I can hold over a thousand books in my hand.


message 44: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Tiffany wrote: That is so cool that they do that for the patients at the senior centers! I think I'll suggest this for our local library, if they don't already!! ."

Good luck. :) When the library here runs short staff, they recruit some high school students who do it for community service credit. (Our high schools encourage it since it looks good on college apps.) So if they say they don't have the manpower, hit them with that. How can they say no?

I hear you on the space issue. One time I moved cross country and realized we could have gotten a much smaller truck except for the books. That I can now fit what took up all that space (and added SO much to the cost of the move) in a space smaller than a notebook boggles the mind. The only downside I've found is that I can't lend or give them away easily.


message 45: by Amber (last edited Apr 06, 2017 03:49PM) (new)

Amber Martingale Yaaresse wrote: "Amber, I meant that the person (Lianne?) who wanted to purchase the book and could not might not live in the US or have access to a library. She might, she might not. We don't know.

Franchesca, I..."


Ah. thought you'd meant I wasn't int he US on that geographic statement.

If you really and truly CAN'T hold onto a book but can hold an e-reader, then it's fine for you but as a traditionalist, I personally despise the things. The kind of light they produce is bad for my eyes...among other reasons.

Belleville has a home delivery service for the library, maybe I'll suggest that they look into the possibility of doing what your libraries do for their senior centers. With the Orange Asswipe in office, we may soon be kissing our free libraries goodbye... .

Tiffany: I hate not being able to afford a car, the insurance for it, the gas for it and the maintenance for it, otherwise I'd agree with you about hating to wait for the book store to open up. But quite a few independent brick and mortar stores are going the way of the dodo and I blame e-books for it. I ALSO blame those who are ABLE to read but are too damned self centered to do so even WITH an e-reader.

Here's an example: I had walked out of our local historic movie house, the Lincoln, a couple years back during the big to-do over BOTH the Twatlight Saga movies and the final half of the concluding Harry Potter movie.

There's a flock of TwiHards waiting out there, all of them ditzy looking as all get out...and not just the blondes (even the gingers were ditzy looking). One child size, and I mean that literally, brunette with tight leather pants a TEAM EDWARD t-shirt so tight I was amazed that she was still BREATHING, much less TALKING to me; asked we which "team" I was on.

"I'm on 'TEAM KILL THEM ALL!'," I told her. Jaws flapped bonelessly. Then I REALLY unloaded the other barrel of my verbal shotgun and said, "Real vampires DO NOT SPARKLE IN THE SUN! They die in it! Read some folklore you brainless twits! Read Bram Stoker or Anne Rice!"

The leader of the twits wearing the t-shirts for TEAM JACOB looked at the other woman, then at me, blinked and said "What's 'folklore'? Who are Bram Stoker and Anne Rice?"

"Are you illiterate?"

"My parents were married!"

" 'Illiterate' means you CAN'T READ! 'Illegitimate' means you're a bastard child and you just proved my point about not being able to read! And that's ALL of you TwiHard twits!"

By this time, steam was figuratively coming out of not just my ears but my nose and mouth as well and I stomped off...but not before hearing all the senior citizens in line for movie tickets applauding me!


message 46: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones Yaaresse wrote: "Tiffany wrote: That is so cool that they do that for the patients at the senior centers! I think I'll suggest this for our local library, if they don't already!! ."

Good luck. :) When the library ..."

Hmmm...my husband and I run a non-profit...this may be a good project. I'll have to do some research. I do have some books in storage, like the huge set of classics that my grandfather gave me when I was 10 (best gift I've ever gotten!! I don't know if he realized the worlds he was going to open for me). I can't read on things like my phone because of the lighting but my kindle is great. I don't sleep a lot so this is perfect, the light is adjustable so it's not obnoxious.


message 47: by Ramona (new)

Ramona I really find Goodreads helpful for keeping track of what I read, and for providing suggestions for what to read. But, I find that I am a reader of what others are not typically reading. I rarely read books from the NY Times Booklist. I love older books, many from the 40s and 50s. I read children's, YA, in all types of genres. Now in my 60s, I am finding it more difficult to discover new authors, books because of the content in so many today. I detest violence, can't tolerate vulgar language, and am very strict about my moral principles. I love to read, and so do my friends...we are just having a difficult time finding books worth reading. It is sad to see the decline in morality in Young adult and children's literature. There are a lot of great books out there that are ignored because they don't get the exposure that others do. That is sad, as they would give a lot of people, something worth reading.


message 48: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Jones Ramona wrote: "I really find Goodreads helpful for keeping track of what I read, and for providing suggestions for what to read. But, I find that I am a reader of what others are not typically reading. I rarely r..."

I agree with you that it's sad that the books that don't have the language, and aren't as violence don't get the exposure. Maybe if more readers make a point of reviewing them, it will help?


message 49: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Amber wrote: "Yaaresse wrote: "Amber, I meant that the person (Lianne?) who wanted to purchase the book and could not might not live in the US or have access to a library. She might, she might not. We don't know..."

No, eons ago I dated someone from Belleville, so I was pretty sure it's in the US. :)


message 50: by Yaaresse (new)

Yaaresse Tiffany, when I was a kid, I discovered a trove of classic my mom had squirreled away. I don't think there was a book in the lot that was published after 1930, but I didn't care. I read them all!

Read on a phone....not sure how anyone does that. I'd have to enlarge the print so much that it would be like reading flashcards! The Kindle app on iPad is a sweet combination for controlling the light and contrast, but the Kindle Fire is pretty darn good, too.

This thread is dangerous. I just downloaded samples of three of the suggested books, and all three look like they are headed for my to-read list. As if I didn't have enough on that already.


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