Expert Advice on How to Develop a Reading Habit

Posted by Cybil on October 1, 2019
Wendy Wood is the author of the new book Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes That Stick. Wood also teaches psychology and business at the University of Southern California. We figured she would be the perfect person to answer a question that many of you have: How do I make more time to read?

Below Woods gives you a step-by-step guide to doing what we all want to do: Spend more time with a great book!


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You are on Goodreads right now, which means that you are someone who appreciates the pleasure of reading a good book. On the other hand, you are on Goodreads right now instead of with that book, so you may also be someone who doesn’t read as much as she would like to.

The data backs this up: “Read more” is on most top-10 lists of New Year’s resolutions. Meanwhile, the percentage of Americans who read each day is declining, as the internet takes up more and more of our attention.

Why don’t we just go with the flow? Why do we keep wanting to read more? Part of the answer is obvious: Reading is fun, entertaining, and often inspiring.

But there are other, less obvious, and less subjective benefits. We know that becoming engrossed in a novel improves brain function and enhances neural connectivity. If that sounds like “reading makes you smarter,” you’re not far off.

And even though reading is a solitary endeavor, there are social benefits as well: The experience of being transported into a fictional world increases your empathy and ability to imagine others’ experiences.

Stressed? Reading just for six minutes can slow your heart rate and ease muscle tension as you escape into a fictional world. So, it’s obvious that we all want to read more, not just because “it’s the right thing to do" but because it is truly good for us. That’s not even taking into account how good books are at giving you something to talk about at your next dinner party.

It’s settled, then. This is one New Year’s resolution worth committing to.

But how do you go about carving out time in your busy life to make it happen?

The best way to start reading more—and keep reading—is to form a habit. Don’t roll your eyes at how obvious this sounds. And forget what you know about habits. Forget about motivation, keeping records, and setting goals. Despite what you might have heard, habits don’t work that way.

Habits do not rely on your willpower or your innate character. Habits rely on repetition.

Essentially, behavior begets behavior. Your brain is set up to “decrease the cost” of each repeated behavior. Every time you do something that you’ve already done, you are on the way toward doing that thing more easily, more automatically, and therefore more stably.

Read a book once, and you’re making a decision. Do it twice, and you’re still learning. Read 100 times in a similar way, under similar circumstances? You don’t have to think twice about it. You’ve done all the thinking you need to do. The hard work is over. You will automatically pick up a book, your brain blissfully free to focus on whatever unfolding story awaits.

The simplicity of this is undergirded by an elegant mental apparatus that we are only just now really understanding. When you do something that feels good (like reading, for the reasons I shared above), your brain reacts by releasing a neurochemical, dopamine, which forms connections in your mind between the context you are in (your comfy reading couch after work) and what you did (read a chapter of the latest pulse-pounding thriller everyone is talking about) to get rewarded. As that connection is reinforced by repetition, it becomes independent from the reward.

In your consciousness, this is what happens when you stop doing something “because it feels good” and you start to do it simply “because that’s what I do.” Ultimately, you only have to see your couch when you walk in the door, and you reach for the book.

In that way, habits are literally mental shortcuts. They connect context and behavior (and do away with reward). They simplify things to the point that we don’t have to really think about them anymore.

So, putting this all together. This is how I, a scientist who studies habits, would get you to read more. First, borrow a tip from the chefs, and prepare your mise en place. Put everything in its place. “Prep” things by placing your book right where you’ll be reading it, whether it’s next to the couch or next to your bed.

Second, make other things more difficult. Add friction to other behaviors (like browsing Twitter). This could be as simple as removing your phone from your pocket and leaving it in the kitchen or putting the TV remote in a drawer.

Next, stack habits. Habits form faster when they seem to “hitch” on other habits. If you already habitually look at your phone when you’re bored, download an ebook and make that the first app that pops up.

Lastly, evaluate. Don’t force yourself to finish a book you don’t like. My own house rule is to stick with a book for 50 pages and quit if I’m not captivated by then. An audit like this is good to have in place, especially if you’re trying to form the reading habit. Eventually your habit will diminish the impact of rewards, but you don’t need to make it so hard from the get-go. Go with what gives you pleasure!

These simple strategies should help you cultivate a better and more consistent reading habit, one that persistently delivers the pleasure of reading a good book.


Wendy Wood's Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes That Stick is available in U.S. stores on October 1. Be sure to add it to your Want to Read shelf.


Do you have advice for your fellow readers about how to develop a reading habit? Please share your tips in the comments!




Comments Showing 1-43 of 43 (43 new)

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message 1: by VM (new)

VM Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it.


message 2: by Stephanie (last edited Oct 12, 2019 04:50AM) (new)

Stephanie VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

Can I ask why you dread reading so much? Is it because it seems like a chore? You cant really find a genre that sparks your interests? Or maybe you're a audio person? I also know a person who prefers to read in groups, makes reading more tolerable because he has people to actually discuss that particular book with.


message 3: by Kathy L. Myers (new)

Kathy L. Myers I dreaded reading for much of my life. I read very slowly, which made finishing a book a chore. Then I started listening to books and my life changed. I love books, and I'm not sure why, but now I read better. So this may not work for you, but it might.


message 4: by Vikki Vaiani (new)

Vikki Vaiani Pick a genre, a topic, a setting , an interest and read to be entertained. Give yourself permission to read at your personal pace - you’re NOT in school any longer where you have allotted reading assignments, masses of pages to plough through and be tested on your comprehension of the material. Read slowly and savor. If you’re trying to develop a reading habit, take time to reinforce the time you invested.


message 5: by Hoda (new)

Hoda @kathy, what app do you use for audio books?


message 6: by Sophie (last edited Oct 18, 2019 03:24AM) (new)

Sophie I have loved reading since I was a little girl. I cannot remember a time when I did not have a pile of books on my nightstand, a paperback in my purse, and a list of TBRs going.

I think my mom teaching me to read at age 3, before I started school,
and reading with me every night, really instilled my habit. It's an addiction for me. I read. That's what I do (between the activities of daily living)!!!


message 7: by Philip (last edited Oct 18, 2019 04:17AM) (new)

Philip VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I can sympathize. I used to be extremely slow, and today still am beneath average speed. What made things worse is my parents teased me about it, "are you counting characters?" was one of the phrases, and when in my childhood I saw a book with an interesting cover they said "You won't finish it anyway".

This might be very different from your background. But most of my live I admired books from a distance and wanted to read them, but was horribly discouraged.
When I discovered good reads, things changed, because I got a reading challange. I told myself "this is stupid, reading is not a race", but still I got into it. Why? Because it's an effective way to make reading feel a little bit more like a game, and thereby a little less like a chore.

So I dug through my place and collected all the books I started, prints and e-books, even pdfs, and chose one I wanted to finish first. I think I allowed myself to have a little competition there, a little test of endurance, because that's something I assossiate with fun. So I just managed five pages per session, or only one if it gives me something to be puzlled about. Maybe that one page is all I read this week, so what? I read! My goal wasn't to get faster, my goal was just to finish the book, however long it takes.

So beeing a very slow reader, I began to cherrish evey single paragraph I progressed. I was happy with myself and learned to accept when I was exhausted after a session. And the next day, I took the next little step. And so on, until after more than a year and about 60 books, I stopped comparing myself to others and just enjoy my time with my books. It takes several hours, but today I can easily read up to 100 pages per day.

Whether or not this offers some help to your situation, I really wish you to accomplish that step and learn, as I have, to enjoy reading.

(Also, consider this: Slow readers tend to induldge their reading more, meaning they process more of the input, meaning they get more out of reading. ;) It's a skill of it's own to read slowly and attentively.)


message 8: by Sophie (new)

Sophie Philip wrote: "VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I can sympathiz..."


Beautifully written and very inspiring! You go, Philip!!


message 9: by Martha (new)

Martha Yes, this is well written and motivational, I agree. The only piece I disagree (for me) -I want to finish every book I read even if I am not thrilled with it. It is something I do not want to change about my reading style.


message 10: by Martha (new)

Martha Philip wrote: "VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I can sympathiz..."


Oh, am I a slow reader too! But, I am not critical of myself anymore. Everyone has their own pace. I deliberately read slowly to absorb what a writer has put on paper. Really absorb. Some books like pulp are a quicker read obviously, but many classics are mind challenging - which I love.


message 11: by Cay (new)

Cay VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

Whenever I read a book I don't want to read (aka school books) I usually focus on paragraphs rather than looking at the page as a whole. It not only helps me get through the book faster but it helps me remember the information more.


message 12: by SUBRATA (new)

SUBRATA DATTA I am a slow reader, too. And that troubles me. Because there are so many books that I want to read. But the problem that troubles me even more is that, lately, my concentration is flagging. I ma repeating sentences.
Professional work pressure may be one of the reasons.
Is meditation likely to help? And regular exercise/morning walk?


message 13: by Madeline (new)

Madeline If you want to start reading but have trouble getting through a book, start with short stories. Find a collection of short stories in a genre that catches your interest. You can read one story in half an hour and you don’t have to remember a bunch of details for the next story. You can also come back to the collection whenever you have time.


message 14: by Erin (new)

Erin VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

You should check out this video on YouTube by Max Joseph, he wants to get into reading, so the expert says that he should just dedicate himself to reading just 20-30 minutes a day. And then you don’t need to feel guilty about it for the rest of the day.


message 15: by Alexa (new)

Alexa VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

Have you considered or tried comics/graphic novels? The part of the brain that recognizes and interprets written language is the same part of the brain that recognizes and interprets line drawings, so when you read comics, the one skill sort of piggybacks on the other, training both at the same time. And even if you take the time to really savor the art (which I highly recommend, of course), graphic novels are generally shorter and quicker to read than prose novels, so you get the sense of accomplishment of finishing a book a lot sooner.

Or if you're not interested in comics for whatever reason, there's always short stories. Why not try the original Sherlock Holmes stories? They're online for free (like on Wikisource) and written in a relatively modern style.


message 16: by Adam (new)

Adam VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I feel you. I have written a quick article about how I got back into it. The main point being that just read about something that really interests you (whatever that may be and of whatever "literary value") and "from reading what you like you will end up liking to read"
https://medium.com/@adam.markakis/the...


message 17: by Doni (last edited Oct 18, 2019 12:39PM) (new)

Doni "Don’t force yourself to finish a book you don’t like...Go with what gives you pleasure!" thanks for this reminder...this is definitely something all readers should keep in mind.


message 18: by Antonio (last edited Oct 18, 2019 01:27PM) (new)

Antonio Gallo I do like reading, but I don't like novels. I dislike "becoming engrossed in a novel. I don't think "it improves brain function and enhances neural connectivity". I don't think there are social benefits. You can read the morning papers for this stuff. The experience of a fictional world is not much better than real world. I prefer this real world to fictional world. I don't like ghosts.


message 19: by Melanie (new)

Melanie Hoda wrote: "@kathy, what app do you use for audio books?"

I use the Libby app. It's very user friendly and if you have multiple library cards (different cities, etc.) it's easy to go back and forth between the libraries.


message 20: by CAMI (new)

CAMI VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I would say find books you enjoy, which I know takes a long time to do. Maybe you like poetry, or graphic novels, or magazines! Start out by reading widely, and within 20 pages or so if you don't want to continue with whatever book, stop reading it. Reading is for everbody, it just takes time to get the hang of. Don't pressure yourself! also watching book tube videos always gets me motivated to read! trust yourself!


message 21: by Holli (new)

Holli Then you haven't found the right books to read. I believe anybody will become a reader with the right guidance. Start anywhere. Read chapter books even. Find someone who can get the right books for you. What do you do in your spare time? What shows do you watch? What do you want from a book? Stress reliever? Help dealing with problems? Don't think you neeed self-help for it. Fiction works just fine. PIck up a book that yhe cover looks interesting to YOU. You willnstart yo develop a sense for which books you will like. Personally I just SCAN the dust jacket and then forget it. Being surpised always makes a book more enjoyable. Nobody likes the same books as everyone else even tho they pretend to and write fake reviews. Direct message me or answer questions here. I bet I could find a book for you.


message 22: by Klm (new)

Klm SUBRATA wrote: "I am a slow reader, too. And that troubles me. Because there are so many books that I want to read. But the problem that troubles me even more is that, lately, my concentration is flagging. I ma re..."
Exercise, especially walking outdoors, is great for the brain and will certainly not be a bad thing! As for meditation, if you are already having trouble with concentration, I recommend staying away from traditional thought-watching meditations, and focusing instead on attention-training, sensory-based ones. These are short and designed to help you place your attention on something you can experience with your senses (a touch, a taste, a smell etc) and off your thoughts, and are better suited for overactive brains, people who are active relaxers, people who are trying to improve their concentration etc. Google "sensory mindfulness" or "five senses meditation" for some specific ideas and scripts.


message 23: by Erin (new)

Erin Reading is such an intensely personal activity. Everyone does it a little differently, but always remember it is YOURS! You cannot do it wrong. Read what you like. If you don't like what you choose, set it down and try again. I have always been a reader, come from a family of readers, and the best memories I have are of my family reading together, picking bits of text to read out loud. It never mattered if it was a picture book, spy novel or biography. Even now, one of the first things we ask each other is what we are reading. My brother is now a grandfather who is rereading the Harry Potter series. My elderly mother doesn't concentrate as well so she reads newspaper and magazine articles. Try anything and everything! I'm with Holli in Message 21, if you want suggestions, send a message or join one of the book groups, most readers love nothing more than sharing the love!


message 24: by Tyler J (new)

Tyler J Gray Don't feel bad for reading slowly. I'm a slow reader as well (I only read as much as I do because i'm disabled and can't work so I have a lot of time on my hands). Reading shouldn't be a chore or something to feel guilty about. Read what you like, what sounds interesting to you. Lists on here, google etc. can help you find what sparks your interest.

I became an avid reader a few years ago and found i've gotten a little faster over time but I think I will always be a slow reader, and that's ok. What is important is to find joy in reading, not how fast you read.


message 25: by Donna (new)

Donna Krebs Klm wrote: "SUBRATA wrote: "I am a slow reader, too. And that troubles me. Because there are so many books that I want to read. But the problem that troubles me even more is that, lately, my concentration is f..."


message 26: by Donna (new)

Donna Krebs !!! I may have flagged your message by mistake. I meant to flag the message AFTER yours. I'm always hitting the wrong keys . so very very sorry. Idon't know how to undo it.


message 27: by Philip (new)

Philip SUBRATA wrote: "I am a slow reader, too. And that troubles me. Because there are so many books that I want to read. But the problem that troubles me even more is that, lately, my concentration is flagging. I ma re..."

It sounds to me that there are other things on your mind which distract you from reading. You can't focus, it seems, because your mind is busy with other things, subconsciously.
Meditation can be helpful for that. There are books and articles and videos on the subject, but in short: You'll want to assume a comfortable position, in a quiet environment, and breath in while counting to ten, relax, breath out while counting to ten, relax, repeat. Once your rhythm is steady, let your thoughts and problems come up as they go - acknowledge/accept them, let them pass.

That can help you sort your thoughts and tell your mind that now is the time for you to recover, and not the time to worry. Conclusively that might help you reach a state wherein you can enjoy reading.

But if something is bothering or pressuring you so much you can't enjoy your personal free time, I'd like very much to encourage you to change something about the source of that pressure. Because then it's not your skill in reading or focus, but that some unhealthy influence is harming you.

Good luck, and take care. :)


message 28: by Waldo (last edited Oct 20, 2019 09:30PM) (new)

Waldo Varjak VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

SUBRATA wrote: "I am a slow reader, too. And that troubles me. Because there are so many books that I want to read. But the problem that troubles me even more is that, lately, my concentration is flagging. I ma re..."

Well I have a different take for the both of you to consider and Your Mileage May Vary. If you learnt to read by sight as I did, using books like Fun with Dick and Jane then you may have a hard time period. When I encounter words like synecdoche for example or words that spell "phunie" as is often the case in genre Fantasy, I stop dead in my tracks. In fact, I refuse to read them.

I was not taught to read phonetically. And reading beyond a certain level is a chore for me. I remember working with my dad at the kitchen table trying to conquer my first grade reader together At the Market by D.H. Buchanan and being very frustrated for hours and hours unable to finish the reading assignment.

So it could be how you were taught to read that is the problem. For that I have the corrective answer Blumenfeld's Alpha-Phonics Workbook A Primer for Beginning Readers by Samuel L. Blumenfeld

When I became a father 6 years ago, I immediately sought out the Dick and Jane books I had fond memories of, wanting to pass them on to my daughter. I read these books when they arrived and was struck dumb at their nonsense. These are not simple readers but they are teaching to read English like Chinese, by sight. I had no idea there were two competing ways to learn to read. My wife and I went with it, reading to each other and encouraging our daughter to join us at the grown up table. But after a while none of us could keep up the charade. My daughter was first to abandon ship. Smart kid.

It was then I started what would become a mini-research project that took me to reputable and notable people like Charlotte Iserbyt. I highly recommend anyone look her up. Then I found Samuel L. Blumenfeld and the 11 flimsy readers that go along with his workbook and carefully reinforce each of the eleven sections of lessons. Now my daughter is reading with the goal on book 11 of reading poetry by writers like Robert Louis Stevenson.

She has a poor vocabulary, of course, but the success of reading encourages her to develop her vocabulary and I cannot imagine how else she would develop her love for reading or her vocabulary without first mastering the "magic" of reading.

And on a final note, Blumenfeld's Alpha-Phonics: Workbook: A Primer for Beginning Readers is intended for anyone regardless their age. It just so happens that in my story here my daughter is 6 years' old and not yet in school.


message 29: by Kathy L. Myers (new)

Kathy L. Myers Hi Hoda, In terms of how I get my audio books, I'm very lucky, I live in San Diego county and the library system has a huge variety of audio titles. I also have Amazon prime, which gives me access to free audio titles too.


message 30: by Thirikwa (new)

Thirikwa Nyingi Good advice there...except that I have to finish a book once I start it. I would never forgive myself if I didn't finish it and that's why I am very careful when choosing what to read just to make sure it suits my needs.


message 31: by Waldo (new)

Waldo Varjak Patrick wrote: "I am very careful when choosing what to read ..."
I have to agree with you there 100%. Once a reader understands the difference between good and bad writing, it does not make sense to wallow in the muck of poor writing. Garbage in , garbage out as we say.

I would never feel compelled to read garbage however.

If I meet someone and they let me know right away that they are not the type of person I want in my life, I do not feel responsible for them or that it is necessary to allow them into my life. I treat books the very same way. That is why the old writer's advice, to arrest the reader's attention in the first few lines, is one I live by. If a writer cannot do their job, then I do not feel self-compelled to do it for them.


message 32: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Bosston Isn't it funny to read about reading habits? Maybe I'm wrong but it seems to be some kind of joke for me. Anyway, it is always interesting to read comments.


message 33: by Steven-John (new)

Steven-John Tait Some good advice there. I'm easily distracted, so I need to put my phone out of sight and out of reach. Sometimes I'll set a timer and focus on reading until the buzzer goes off.

Steven-John Tait
Vagabundo by Steven-John Tait


message 34: by Baby Rani (new)

Baby Rani Karmakar Books are my all time best Friends. They give me best company in every season of my life, in crisis, in happy time. As a child I found book as a space to stay safe.
I like the article of this author.
Thank you


message 35: by Random (new)

Random VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

What is it about reading that you dread? Its difficult to give an answer when you don't fully understand the questions.


message 36: by Rob (new)

Rob If a book isn't working, I drop it and move on. I'm very much a mood reader so tend to have several on the go at once and read what I'm in the mood for at that time. I'm not a fast reader, and I don't get on with audio books. This year's challenge of 40 will be tough, but I'll give it a shot knowing that I managed 32 this year . Happy reading, All!!


message 37: by Jazmin (new)

Jazmin I'm a junior in high school and I've always loved reading. I'm currently taking some college English course in hopes to pursue an education and career in library sciences. Currently, I have a very busy schedule between school, work, band, and church. It's very hard to find the time to read anymore, unless it is is during break. I'd like to find a way to fit reading into my busy schedule.
Along with that, I really want to work on reading more of the classics, but I'm often disappointed when I try to pick one up and I can't get very far without being uninterested. Maybe it's just because I'm too young? I'd like to figure out how to get more invested in classics, not just for the sake of expanding my own knowledge of books, but for the sake of my pursuit of a literary education and career. Please help!!


message 38: by Ana (new)

Ana Otero Philip wrote: "VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

I can sympathiz..."



Thanks for sharing. Your experience has given me more interest and motivation. Last year I just read 4 out of 12. This year I hope to get farther. Reading your comment has given me tools: reading not for the race, but for the joy of reading! Thanks


message 39: by Csilla (new)

Csilla Antonio wrote: "I do like reading, but I don't like novels. I dislike "becoming engrossed in a novel. I don't think "it improves brain function and enhances neural connectivity". I don't think there are social ben..."
A novel is an opportunity to experience the world through the eyes of another person. That's why no amount of morning paper and real life everyday conversation can give your E.Q. a boost like reading novels.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* Interesting advice on habits in general, not just for reading. I'm trying to develop better habits overall and let go of some old ones.

As for the comments here, I see some didn't like reading as much or had struggles with slower reading speeds - trust me, there are downsides on fast reading, too, so please don't let that deter you from the hobby if you enjoy it.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

The advice from the article applies to your situation, too. Associate it with positivity and repetition as the article writer was saying. Although the article said not to start habits with goal and list settings, maybe trying to set aside the same time period every day to read?

And a key to reading for those who don't enjoy a variety of authors is finding an author's style you enjoy. The writing style goes as far to reach a person who doesn't like reading as much as the plot does (at least in fiction)


message 42: by Waldo (new)

Waldo Varjak VM wrote: "Well, the advice sounds good for those people who like to read. But what about people like me, who dread the idea of reading, but would like to cultivate a habit of it."

A personal experience with relevance to your situation.

I am currently reading a 398 page academic book as research. I have no choice in the matter. I hate the book. It rubs me wrong, politically. It rubs me wrong grammatically. It's like Ice fishing in gym shorts with hunger pains and only catching minnows. I have not a choice in the matter. If it were for a course, I would drop the course. I am doing it for my writing.

Oh, yeah, I am a writer who hates to read to begin with.

So in my case I use Goodreads to track my reading. Right now, after one month, I have read 25% of the book. Every 1% is a hard fought win for me. And that's how I read.

In 2018 I read over 4,000 pages. Last year was a tough year for time. I managed just over 2,200. I set the number of books I intend to read for a challenge by upping the number by +1. In 2018 I read 16 books of a target of 8. Last year I read 11 of a target of 9. This year my target is 10. And if I cannot manage 10 this year, with a trans-continental move in the middle of 2020, then my goal for 2021 will remain at 10.

This is my strategy. Goodreads has told me that this sort of thing is not the raison d'etre for this website and, in fact, it is low priority. I've been told to use a spreadsheet program if that's all I want from this site. Nevertheless, the results I have been getting by using this website in the manner in which I do leads me to recommend my strategy to you.


message 43: by Bob (new)

Bob Finistraty These are wonderful lyrics with a slight student naivety. I recently wrote a custom poem and a short essay on the problems of modern students. I used resources https://writix.co.uk/buy-essay-online that help to identify a specific position. This verse helped me understand that life is an interesting phenomenon.


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