Timothy Mitchell


Genre


Professor

Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures

Columbia University

612 Kent Hall, Mail Code 3928
1140 Amsterdam Ave.

New York, NY 10027

Tel: 212-854 5252
Email: tm2421@columbia.edu







Timothy Mitchell is a political theorist who studies the political economy of the Middle East, the political role of economics and other forms of expert knowledge, the politics of large-scale technical systems, and the place of colonialism in the making of modernity.

Educated at Queens' College, Cambridge, where he received a first-class honours degree in History, Mitchell completed his Ph.D. in Politics and Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University in 1984. He joined Columbia University in 2008 after teaching for twenty-five years at New Yor
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Average rating: 4.02 · 2,261 ratings · 218 reviews · 47 distinct worksSimilar authors
استعمار مصر

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Carbon Democracy: Political...

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Rule of Experts: Egypt, Tec...

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دراستان حول التراث والحداثة

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الديموقراطية والدولة فى الع...

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Questions Of Modernity

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مصر في الخطاب الأميركي

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3.50 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1991
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Flamenco Deep Song

4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1994
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Betrayal of the Innocents: ...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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Georges Rouault: The Passio...

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“وللمساعدة على "نشر السُلطة"، كان يجري إصدارُ الأوامر عن طريق تلغراف إشاريّ (...) حيث عند إصدار التلغراف لإشارة الحرف ( أ = إلى الأمام )، كانت تستدير المدرسة كلها لدرى رؤيته إلى جهة النّاظر. أو إشارة ( أ أ أ = اعرضوا الألواح الاردوازيّة )، والتي تعرض المدرسة كلها لدى رؤيته الألواح الاردوازيّة، ويجري شدّ انتباه المدرسة عن طريق جرس جِدُّ صغير مُلحق، لا يتطلّب دقًّا عاليًا، بل يتميَّز بصوت واضح حادّ.
وقد درَّبت الإشارات التلغرافية الطالب على "الطاعة المُطلقة"، مما خلق (نسق عام). والحال أنّ الواقع البصري لهذا النِّظام من موقع نظر النَّاظر الفرد على رأس المدرسة كان ملحوظاً، على سبيل المثال: فإن المرغوب فيه معرفة أن يديّ كل فتىً في المدرسة نظيفتان، عندئذٍ يصدر أمر (اعرضوا الأصابع)، وعلى الفور يرفع كل طالب يديه، ويمُدُّ أصابعه، ثم يمُر العُرفاء بين مناضد فصولهم، ويُفتّش كلٌّ منهم فصله، وهكذا يجري فحص النظافة في المدرسة كلها في خمس دقائق، وتساعد ممارسة التفتيش، والتي يتوقعها الطالب، على تعزيز النظافة الاعتيادية، وفي مدرسة من ثلاثمائة طالب سوف يجري عرض ثلاثة آلاف إصبع وإبهام في دقيقة”
Timothy Mitchell, استعمار مصر

“...fossil fuels are forms of energy in which great quantities of space and time, as it were, have been compressed into a concentrated form. One way of envisioning this compression is to consider that a single litre of petrol used today needed about twenty-five metric tons of ancient marine life as precursor material, or that organic matter equivalent to all of the plant and animal life produced over the entire earth for four hundred years was required to produce the fossil fuels we burn today in a single year.”
Timothy Mitchell, Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil

“In introducing technical innovations, or using energy in novel ways, or developing alternative sources of power, we are not subjecting ‘society’ to some new external influence, or conversely using social forces to alter an external reality called ‘nature’. We are reorganising socio-technical worlds, in which what we call social, natural and technical processes are present at every point.


These entanglements, however, are not recognised in our theories of collective life, which continue to divide the world according to the conventional divisions between fields of specialist knowledge. There is a natural world studied by the various branches of natural science, and a social world analysed by the social sciences. Debates about human-induced climate change, the depletion of non-renewable resources, or any other question, create political uncertainty not so much because they reach the limits of technical and scientific knowledge, but because of the way they breach this conventional distinction between society and nature.”
Timothy Mitchell, Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil



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