Venedikt Erofeev


Born
in Kandalaksha, Murmansk Oblast, Russian Federation
October 24, 1938

Died
May 11, 1990


Venedikt Vasilyevich Erofeev (Венедикт Васильевич Ерофеев), was a Russian writer.

He managed to enter the philology department of the Moscow State University but was expelled from the University after a year and a half because he did not attend compulsory military training.

Later he studied in several more institutes in different towns including Kolomna and Vladimir but he has never managed to graduate from any, usually being expelled due to his "amoral behaviour" (freethinking).

Between 1958 and 1975 Yerofeyev lived without propiska in towns in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania, also spending some time in Uzbekistan and Tadjikistan, doing different low-qualified and underpaid jobs.

Yerofeyev is best known for his 1969 poem in prose Mosc
...more

Average rating: 4.05 · 7,830 ratings · 326 reviews · 20 distinct worksSimilar authors
Moscow to the End of the Line

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4.06 avg rating — 7,270 ratings — published 1969 — 96 editions
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Записки психопата. Москва -...

4.07 avg rating — 136 ratings — published 2003
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Записки психопата

3.67 avg rating — 192 ratings — published 2000 — 11 editions
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Вальпургиева ночь

3.82 avg rating — 138 ratings — published 2001 — 7 editions
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Собрание сочинений в 2-х то...

4.42 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2001
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Записные книжки

4.39 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2005
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Бесполезное ископаемое. Из ...

3.80 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2001
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Моя маленькая лениниана

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3.68 avg rating — 19 ratings
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Събрани съчинения

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4.32 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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Мой очень жизненный путь

4.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2003
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More books by Venedikt Erofeev…
“Everything should take place slowly and incorrectly so that man doesn't get a chance to start feeling proud, so that man is sad and perplexed.”
Venedikt Erofeev, Moscow to the End of the Line

“I've always been in two minds about women, really. On the one hand, I always liked the fact they had waists, and we hadn't. That aroused in me a feeling of - how shall I put it? - well, pleasure. Yes, pleasurable feelings. Still, on the other hand, they did stab Marat with a penknife, and Marat was Incorruptible, so they shouldn't have stabbed him. That fairly killed off the pleasure. Then again, like Karl Marx, I've always loved women for their little weaknesses - i.e. they've got to sit down to pee, and I've always liked that - that's always filled me with - well, what the hell - a sort of warm feeling. Yes, pleasurable warmth. But then again they did shoot at Lenin, with a revolver no less! And that put a damper on the pleasure as well. I mean, fair enough, sitting down to pee, but shooting at Lenin? That's a sick joke, talking about pleasure after that.

However, I digress.”
Venedikt Erofeev, Moscow to the End of the Line

“I like the fact that my compatriots have such vacant and protruding eyes. They fill me with virtuous pride. You can imagine what eyes are like (in the capitalist world). ...such eyes look at you with distrust, reflecting constant worry and torment. That's what they're like in the land of ready cash.
How different from the eyes of my people! Their steady stare is completely devoid of all tension. They harbor no thought - but what power! What spiritual power! Such eyes would not sell you. They couldn't sell anything or buy anything. You could spit in the eyes, and they’d call it God's (divine) dew...”
Venedikt Erofeev, Moscow to the End of the Line

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