Ian Sansom


Born
in The United Kingdom
December 04, 1966

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Average rating: 3.18 · 7,603 ratings · 1,444 reviews · 24 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Case of the Missing Boo...

3.02 avg rating — 3,291 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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Mr. Dixon Disappears (Mobil...

3.22 avg rating — 947 ratings — published 2006 — 19 editions
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The Bad Book Affair (Mobile...

3.39 avg rating — 626 ratings — published 2010 — 9 editions
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The Book Stops Here (Mobile...

3.39 avg rating — 630 ratings — published 2008 — 14 editions
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The Norfolk Mystery (The Co...

2.98 avg rating — 977 ratings — published 2011 — 14 editions
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Death in Devon (The County ...

3.26 avg rating — 327 ratings — published 2015 — 7 editions
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Paper: An Elegy

3.49 avg rating — 236 ratings — published 2012 — 16 editions
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Westmorland Alone (The Coun...

3.70 avg rating — 160 ratings — published 2016 — 7 editions
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Essex Poison (The County Gu...

3.57 avg rating — 111 ratings — published 2017 — 3 editions
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The Impartial Recorder: A N...

3.58 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 2004
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More books by Ian Sansom…
The Case of the Missing Books Mr. Dixon Disappears The Book Stops Here The Bad Book Affair
(4 books)
by
3.14 avg rating — 5,494 ratings

The Norfolk Mystery Death in Devon Westmorland Alone The Sussex Murder
(5 books)
by
3.17 avg rating — 1,639 ratings

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“[L]ibrarians, like ministers of religion, and poets, and people with mental health disorders, can make people nervous.”
Ian Sansom

“Children are bad enough--children are rude, selfish, greedy, and unthinking individuals who are unable to distinguish between their own selfish wants and needs and the wants and needs of others. And adults are children with money, alcohol, and power.”
Ian Sansom

“But then twitching nervously in the presence of a librarian wasn't an uncommon response—librarians, like ministers of religion, and poets, and people with serious mental health disorders, can make people nervous. Librarians possess a kind of occult power, an aura. They could silence people with just a glance. At least, they did in Israel's fantasies. In Israel's fantasies, librarians were mild-mannered superheroes, with extrasensory perceptions and a highly developed sense of responsibility who demanded respect from everyone they met. In reality, Israel couldn't silence even Mrs Onions on her mobile phone when she was disturbing other readers.”
Ian Sansom, The Book Stops Here



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