Fred Hebert

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Fred Hebert

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Born
in Saguenay, Canada
February 14

Website

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Member Since
November 2013

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Fred Hebert is a systems architect at a video surveillance, access control management, and license plate recognition company. He previously worked as a tech lead on a cloud platform’s networking services. He has also worked in real-time bidding systems, as a professional Erlang trainer and course maintainer, and is one of the maintainers of the principal Erlang build tool.

He wrote 3 books about Erlang, a bunch of blog posts, and that's about it.

Average rating: 4.48 · 324 ratings · 26 reviews · 7 distinct worksSimilar authors
Learn you some Erlang for g...

4.52 avg rating — 273 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Stuff Goes Bad: Erlang in A...

4.25 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 2014
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Property-Based Testing with...

4.29 avg rating — 7 ratings3 editions
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Property-Based Testing with...

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すごいErlangゆかいに学ぼう!

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Quackery by Lydia Kang
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The Underachiever's Manifesto by Ray Bennett
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Why Your Five-Year-Old Could Not Have Done That by Susie Hodge
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Spy the Lie by Philip Houston
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A Philosophy of Software Design by John Ousterhout
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Il y aura des morts by Patrick Senécal
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Building Microservices by Sam Newman
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My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, Vol. 1 by Emil Ferris
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The Systems Bible by John Gall
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Death's End by Liu Cixin
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More of Fred's books…
“If a customer asks you to build a system that handles netsplits while staying consistent and available, you know that you need to either calmly explain the CAP theorem or run away (possibly by jumping through a window, for a maximal effect).”
Fred Hebert, Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide

“The so-called paradox of freedom is the argument that freedom in the sense of absence of any constraining control must lead to very great restraint, since it makes the bully free to enslave the meek. The idea is, in a slightly different form, and with very different tendency, clearly expressed in Plato.

Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.”
Karl Raimund Popper, The Open Society and Its Enemies

“It was a movie about American bombers in World War II and the gallant men who flew them. Seen backwards by Billy, the story went like this: American planes, full of holes and wounded men and corpses took off backwards from an airfield in England. Over France, a few German fighter planes flew at them backwards, sucked bullets and shell fragments from some of the planes and crewmen. They did the same for wrecked American bombers on the ground, and those planes flew up backwards to join the formation.

The formation flew backwards over a German city that was in flames. The bombers opened their bomb bay doors, exerted a miraculous magnetism which shrunk the fires, gathered them into cylindrical steel containers , and lifted the containers into the bellies of the planes. The containers were stored neatly in racks. The Germans below had miraculous devices of their own, which were long steel tubes. They used them to suck more fragments from the crewmen and planes. But there were still a few wounded Americans though and some of the bombers were in bad repair. Over France though, German fighters came up again, made everything and everybody as good as new.

When the bombers got back to their base, the steel cylinders were taken from the racks and shipped back to the United States of America, where factories were operating night and day, dismantling the cylinders, separating the dangerous contents into minerals. Touchingly, it was mainly women who did this work. The minerals were then shipped to specialists in remote areas. It was their business to put them into the ground, to hide them cleverly, so they would never hurt anybody ever again.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

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