Jay Rayner


Born
in The United Kingdom
January 01, 1966

Genre


Jay Rayner is a British journalist, writer and broadcaster born in 1966.


Average rating: 3.68 · 2,605 ratings · 328 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Man Who Ate the World: ...

3.56 avg rating — 717 ratings — published 2008 — 10 editions
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A Greedy Man in a Hungry Wo...

3.90 avg rating — 606 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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My Dining Hell: Twenty Ways...

3.86 avg rating — 342 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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The Apologist

3.19 avg rating — 363 ratings — published 2004 — 9 editions
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The Ten (Food) Commandments

4.02 avg rating — 194 ratings2 editions
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Day of Atonement

3.96 avg rating — 93 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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Eating Crow: A Novel of Apo...

2.96 avg rating — 118 ratings — published 2004 — 9 editions
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Wasted Calories and Ruined ...

4.24 avg rating — 119 ratings3 editions
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The Oyster House Siege

3.57 avg rating — 30 ratings2 editions
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Star Dust falling: the stor...

3.89 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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More books by Jay Rayner…

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“Too often we only identify the crucial points in our lives in retrospect. At the time we are too absorbed in the fetid detail of the moment to spot where it is leading us. But not this time. I was experiencing one of my dad’s deafening moments. If my life could be understood as a meal of many courses (and let’s be honest, much of it actually was), then I had finished the starters and I was limbering up for the main event. So far, of course, I had made a stinking mess of it. I had spilled the wine. I had dropped my cutlery on the floor and sprayed the fine white linen with sauce. I had even spat out some of my food because I didn’t like the taste of it.

“But it doesn’t matter because, look, here come the waiters. They are scraping away the debris with their little horn and steel blades, pulled with studied grace from the hidden pockets of their white aprons. They are laying new tablecloths, arranging new cutlery, placing before me great domed wine glasses, newly polished to a sparkle. There are more dishes to come, more flavors to try, and this time I will not spill or spit or drop or splash. I will not push the plate away from me, the food only half eaten. I am ready for everything they are preparing to serve me. Be in no doubt; it will all be fine.” (pp.115-6)”
Jay Rayner, Eating Crow: A Novel of Apology

“The dish is...a fearsomely good combination of flavors and textures, the tapioca and the caviar playing tag with each other in the mouth.”
Jay Rayner, The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner

“It does not have walls splattered with gold leaf like King Midas has had a nosebleed.”
Jay Rayner, The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner



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