Alan Taylor

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Alan Taylor


Born
in Portland, Maine, The United States
January 01, 1955

Genre

Influences


Alan Shaw Taylor is a historian specializing in early American history. He is the author of a number of books about colonial America, the American Revolution, and the Early American Republic. He has won a Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize for his work.

Taylor graduated from Colby College, in Waterville, Maine, in 1977 and earned his Ph.D. from Brandeis University in 1986. Currently a professor of history at the University of California, Davis, he will join the faculty of the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia in 2014.

Average rating: 4.04 · 9,766 ratings · 1,054 reviews · 131 distinct worksSimilar authors
American Colonies: The Sett...

4.05 avg rating — 4,016 ratings — published 2001 — 16 editions
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The Civil War of 1812: Amer...

3.94 avg rating — 1,071 ratings — published 2010 — 9 editions
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The Internal Enemy: Slavery...

4.15 avg rating — 693 ratings — published 2013 — 9 editions
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William Cooper's Town: Powe...

4.03 avg rating — 591 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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Colonial America: A Very Sh...

3.57 avg rating — 298 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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The Divided Ground: Indians...

3.91 avg rating — 203 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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Liberty Men and Great Propr...

3.90 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1990 — 4 editions
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The Secret Annexe: An Antho...

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4.15 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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Boston in the American Revo...

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4.41 avg rating — 17 ratings2 editions
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Writing Early American History

4.50 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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More books by Alan Taylor…
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“Writing to his son in 1799, John Adams blamed America’s political turmoil on “a systematical dissolution of the true Family Authority. There can never be any regular Government of a Nation without a marked Subordination of Mothers and Children to the Father.” Tellingly, Adams suddenly remembered his forceful wife and urged his son to keep his patriarchal sentiments “a Secret,” for their revelation would “infallibly raise a Rebellion against me.”67 Rather”
Alan Taylor, American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804

“The greatest liberator was Robert Carter of Nomini Hall in the Northern Neck. An eccentric great planter, he experimented in radical religion, joining a Baptist church that included twenty-nine of his own slaves. Carter’s spiritual quest led him to recognize slavery as a sin. In 1791 he began to liberate his 509 slaves, freeing about 25 a year until completing the process in 1812. His dismayed children saw much of their inheritance dissolve into freedom, and his neighbors denounced the freedmen for setting bad examples that ruined their slaves, who thereafter resented and resisted their bondage. An angry neighbor rebuked Carter, “It appears to me (witnessing the consequences) that a man has almost as good a right to set fire to his own building though his neighbor’s is to be destroyed by it, as to free his slaves.”
Alan Taylor, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832

“Fleeing first, in November 1813, Presley represented the greatest blow, for a body servant was a master’s favorite and confidante: no one knew Jones better than Presley did. Presley, however, preferred to serve a Royal Navy captain. In 1815 a visitor to HMS Havannah recognized Presley, whom he praised as “uncommonly likely & trained as a House Servant.” The visitor noted that Presley had renamed himself “Washington,” evidently after the great revolutionary leader who had won liberty and independence for the Americans.3 As a black Washington, Presley returned to free his friends and family left behind. In October 1814, Presley guided a British raiding party to Kinsale, liberating the rest of the slaves and casting Jones out. Presley’s return represents a common pattern in the slave escapes during the war. Runaways tended to bolt in two stages: in the first, a pioneer runaway made initial contact with the British, and then in the second stage, he returned home to liberate kin and friends.”
Alan Taylor, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832

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