Daniel Ellsberg

Daniel Ellsberg


Born
in Chicago, Illinois, The United States
April 07, 1931

Website

Genre


Daniel Ellsberg is a former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of US government decision-making about the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers.

Ellsberg is the recipient of the Inaugural Ron Ridenhour Courage Prize, a prize established by The Nation Institute and The Fertel Foundation. In 1978 he accepted the Gandhi Peace Award from Promoting Enduring Peace. On September 28, 2006 he was awarded the Right Livelihood Award.

Ellsberg has been married twice. His first marriage, to Carol Cummings, the daughter of a Marine Corps Brigadier General, lasted 13 years before e
...more

Daniel Ellsberg isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.

Andrew Rice interviewed Daniel Ellsberg for a profile in New York Magazine.


Here are some passages:


“Keeping secrets was my career,” Daniel Ellsberg says. “I didn’t lose the aptitude for that when I put out the Pentagon Papers.” This might come as a shock, considering that the former Defense Department analyst is best known for leaking classified information nearly half a century ago, thus bringi...

Read more of this blog post »
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on November 28, 2017 17:57 • 17 views
Average rating: 4.19 · 1,802 ratings · 258 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
Secrets: A Memoir of Vietna...

4.20 avg rating — 954 ratings — published 2002 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Doomsday Machine: Confe...

4.24 avg rating — 678 ratings — published 2017 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Papers on the War

4.07 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1972 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Critical Mass: Voices For A...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1996
Rate this book
Clear rating
Risk, Ambiguity and Decisio...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2001 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
English Canadian Literature...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
Blood on the Tracks: The Li...

by
4.42 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Made Love, Got War: Close E...

by
3.33 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
Dissent: Voices of Conscience

by
4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Vietnam Labyrinth: Allies, ...

by
4.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Daniel Ellsberg…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Only we, the public, can force our representatives
to reverse their abdication of the war powers that the
Constitution gives exclusively to the Congress.”
Daniel Ellsberg

“one can ask why they didn’t explore more vigorously the possible environmental consequences of this unprecedented ecological experiment—an all-out thermonuclear war—for which they were preparing. Or why, more than thirty years since scientists first posited these dangers, and more than ten years since scientific uncertainties about their calculations have been put to rest, our plans have continued to include “options” for detonating hundreds of nuclear explosions near cities, which would loft enough soot and smoke into the upper stratosphere to lead to death by starvation of nearly everyone on earth, including, after all, ourselves.”
Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner

“These two systems still risk doomsday: both are still on hair-trigger alert that makes their joint existence unstable. They are susceptible to being triggered on a false alarm, a terrorist action, unauthorized launch, or a desperate decision to escalate. They would kill billions of humans, perhaps ending complex life on earth. This is true even though the Cold War that rationalized their existence and hair-trigger status—and their supposed necessity to national security—ended thirty years ago. Does the United States still need a Doomsday Machine? Does Russia? Did they ever? Does the existence of such a capability serve any national or international interest whatsoever to a degree that would justify its obvious danger to human life? I ask the questions not merely rhetorically. They deserve sober, reflective consideration. The answers do seem obvious, but so far as I know they have never been addressed. There follows another question: Does any nation on earth have a right to possess such a capability?”
Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner

Topics Mentioning This Author



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Daniel to Goodreads.