Preston Sprinkle


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Preston Sprinkle (PhD, Aberdeen) is a teacher, speaker, and New York Times bestselling author. He has written several books including People to Be Loved, Living in a Gray World, Charis, and Erasing Hell, which he co-authored with Francis Chan. Preston has held faculty positions at Nottingham University, Cedarville University, and Eternity Bible College. He and his family live in Boise, Idaho, and he currently helps pastors and leaders engage the LGBTQ conversation with thoughtfulness and grace.

Preston Sprinkle isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.

My Nashville Statement

It is ironic and possibly prophetic that the Nashville Statement (NS) was published the very same day that I released a short film on LGBT people in the church titled Dear Church: I’m Gay. I think these two “statements” represent two brands of evangelical approaches to questions about faith, sexuality & gender. These two brands overlap quite a bit; they both agree that marriage is between a...

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Published on September 03, 2017 16:26
Average rating: 4.0 · 12,989 ratings · 1,006 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
Fight: A Christian Case for...

4.30 avg rating — 549 ratings — published 2013 — 6 editions
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People to Be Loved: Why Hom...

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4.34 avg rating — 466 ratings — published 2016 — 2 editions
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Charis: God's Scandalous Gr...

4.42 avg rating — 392 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Living in a Gray World: A C...

4.13 avg rating — 126 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
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Four Views on Hell: Second ...

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4.05 avg rating — 117 ratings — published 2016 — 2 editions
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Two Views on Homosexuality,...

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3.93 avg rating — 107 ratings2 editions
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Go: Returning Discipleship ...

4.25 avg rating — 53 ratings2 editions
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Grace/Truth 2.0: Five More ...

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Erasing Hell: What God Said...

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3.93 avg rating — 10,879 ratings — published 2011
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The Francis Chan Collection...

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4.57 avg rating — 280 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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“Grace, on the other hand, means that God is pursuing you. That God forgives you. That God sanctifies you. When you are apathetic toward God, He is never apathetic toward you. When you don’t desire to pray and talk to God, He never grows tired of talking to you. When you forget to read your Bible and listen to God, He is always listening to you. Grace means that your spirituality is upheld by God’s stubborn enjoyment of you.

Charis: God's Scandalous Grace for Us (p. 76).”
Preston Sprinkle

“But if we never hug a harlot, befriend a beggar, or forgive our enemy seventy times seven, then we confess grace with our lips but mock it with our lives.”
Preston Sprinkle, Charis: God's Scandalous Grace for Us

“TULLIAN TCHIVIDJIAN   The best definition for grace I know comes from Paul Zahl: Grace is love that seeks you out when you have nothing to give in return. Grace is love coming at you that has nothing to do with you. Grace is being loved when you are unlovable…. The cliché definition of grace is “unconditional love.” It is a true cliché, for it is a good description of the thing.… Let’s go a little further, though. Grace is a love that has nothing to do with you, the beloved. It has everything and only to do with the lover. Grace is irrational in the sense that it has nothing to do with weights and measures. It has nothing to do with my intrinsic qualities or so-called “gifts” (whatever they may be). It reflects a decision on the part of the giver, the one who loves, in relation to the receiver, the one who is loved, that negates any qualifications the receiver may personally hold…. Grace is one-way love.1 Grace doesn’t make demands. It just gives. And from our vantage point, it always gives to the wrong person. We see this over and over again in the Gospels: Jesus is always giving to the wrong people—prostitutes, tax collectors, half-breeds. The most extravagant sinners of Jesus’s day receive His most compassionate welcome. Grace is a divine vulgarity that stands caution on its head.”
Preston Sprinkle, Charis: God's Scandalous Grace for Us



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