Steven Pinker


Born
in Montreal, Canada
September 18, 1954

Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences


Steven Arthur Pinker is a prominent Canadian-American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and author of popular science. Pinker is known for his wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. He conducts research on language and cognition, writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and The New Republic, and is the author of seven books, including The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, Words and Rules, The Blank Slate, and most recently, The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature.

He was born in Canada and graduated from Montreal's Dawson College in 1973. He received a bachelor's degree in experimental psychology from McGill University in 1976, and then w
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Steven Pinker isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.

•Michel, J.-B., Shen, Y. K., Aiden, A. P., Veres, A., Gray, M. K., The_Google_Books_Team, Pickett, J. P., Hoiberg, D., Clancy, D. ,Norvig, P., Orwant, J., Pinker, S.,  Nowak, M., & Lieberman-Aiden, E.  (2011). Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books.  , 331, 176-182. Science




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Published on January 14, 2011 08:47 • 1,273 views
Average rating: 4.03 · 108,159 ratings · 7,874 reviews · 40 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Blank Slate: The Modern...

4.08 avg rating — 18,259 ratings — published 2002 — 47 editions
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How the Mind Works

3.97 avg rating — 16,001 ratings — published 1997 — 54 editions
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The Language Instinct: How ...

4.05 avg rating — 15,598 ratings — published 1994 — 48 editions
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The Better Angels of Our Na...

4.20 avg rating — 17,517 ratings — published 2010 — 53 editions
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The Stuff of Thought: Langu...

3.91 avg rating — 8,815 ratings — published 2007 — 37 editions
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Enlightenment Now: The Case...

4.24 avg rating — 6,611 ratings — published 2018 — 25 editions
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The Sense of Style: The Thi...

4.06 avg rating — 5,010 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Words and Rules: The Ingred...

3.91 avg rating — 1,522 ratings — published 1999 — 17 editions
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Do Humankind’s Best Days Li...

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3.39 avg rating — 497 ratings — published 2016 — 7 editions
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The Best American Science a...

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3.91 avg rating — 210 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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More books by Steven Pinker…
(3 books)
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“It's natural to think that living things must be the handiwork of a designer. But it was also natural to think that the sun went around the earth. Overcoming naive impressions to figure out how things really work is one of humanity's highest callings.

[Can You Believe in God and Evolution? Time Magazine, August 7, 2005]”
Steven Pinker

“Just as blueprints don't necessarily specify blue buildings, selfish genes don't necessarily specify selfish organisms. As we shall see, sometimes the most selfish thing a gene can do is build a selfless brain. Genes are a play within a play, not the interior monologue of the players.”
Steven Pinker, How the Mind Works

“Challenge a person's beliefs, and you challenge his dignity, standing, and power. And when those beliefs are based on nothing but faith, they are chronically fragile. No one gets upset about the belief that rocks fall down as opposed to up, because all sane people can see it with their own eyes. Not so for the belief that babies are born with original sin or that God exists in three persons or that Ali is the second-most divinely inspired man after Muhammad. When people organize their lives around these beliefs, and then learn of other people who seem to be doing just fine without them--or worse, who credibly rebut them--they are in danger of looking like fools. Since one cannot defend a belief based on faith by persuading skeptics it is true, the faithful are apt to react to unbelief with rage, and may try to eliminate that affront to everything that makes their lives meaningful.”
Steven Pinker, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined



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